USAF Combat Controller Medal of Honor

#2
#4
An extremely brave man.

May his family be given even the smallest comfort by knowing he died saving others.
That’s the motto, “these things we do, so others may live”.
 
#5
I read a very good book about Roberts Ridge a while ago, which indicated that the action was a complete cluster however, that in no way takes anything from the actions of Sgt Chapman and his thoroughly deserved (if a tad tardy) recognition.
 
#6
I read the book a few years ago. It's one of those books that you can't put down. A thoroughly gripping real life story of honour, courage and sacrifice.

Over the last decade there have been other actions comparable to this one. I sometimes find myself questioning the wisdom (sic) of the senior military types who send the type of troops that they know full well will fight to the end to get the job done.

These troops will also fight and sacrifice themselves to rescue one of their brother troops. Is that why they send these type of men into these jobs.

Do the senior military types see the troops as humans or just a military asset to be used as tools.

Sorry for the philosophical thread drift.
 
#7
I read the book a few years ago. It's one of those books that you can't put down. A thoroughly gripping real life story of honour, courage and sacrifice.

Over the last decade there have been other actions comparable to this one. I sometimes find myself questioning the wisdom (sic) of the senior military types who send the type of troops that they know full well will fight to the end to get the job done.

These troops will also fight and sacrifice themselves to rescue one of their brother troops. Is that why they send these type of men into these jobs.

Do the senior military types see the troops as humans or just a military asset to be used as tools.

Sorry for the philosophical thread drift.
It’s the creed, these things we do, so others may live.

The PJ’s are a much under estimated capability through out of bot the USA and wider world, these lads are tier one operators with the med skill set to match.
 
#8
I have nothing but respect for Sergeant Chapman and people like him.

R.I.P. Sergeant Chapman.
 
#9
It’s the creed, these things we do, so others may live.

The PJ’s are a much under estimated capability through out of bot the USA and wider world, these lads are tier one operators with the med skill set to match.
Indeed. The training course for Para Rescue takes almost two years and the attrition rate is over 80% The EMT - Paramedic course alone takes thirty weeks and includes training in Field Surgery.
 
#10
It’s the creed, these things we do, so others may live.

The PJ’s are a much under estimated capability through out of bot the USA and wider world, these lads are tier one operators with the med skill set to match.
I don’t think under estimated is the way to put it. They are just more low key compared to the Seals. Which is not a bad thing.
 
#12
I read the book a few years ago. It's one of those books that you can't put down. A thoroughly gripping real life story of honour, courage and sacrifice.

Over the last decade there have been other actions comparable to this one. I sometimes find myself questioning the wisdom (sic) of the senior military types who send the type of troops that they know full well will fight to the end to get the job done.

These troops will also fight and sacrifice themselves to rescue one of their brother troops. Is that why they send these type of men into these jobs.

Do the senior military types see the troops as humans or just a military asset to be used as tools.

Sorry for the philosophical thread drift.
There is also what I call the "lack of adult supervision" factor.

Having served in similar units, I can attest that at the lower levels of command within such units there is often an attitude of "any mission will do." At such times the SMEs need to advise higher command that a given mission profile has an unacceptably low chance of success such that alternatives should be considered.

Too often, however, they let their desire for sharp action outweigh their professional judgment and bad things happen. That is when the "adult supervision" is sorely needed.

This phenomenon was, IMHO, at play in the very ill-fated Bravo 20 and in numerous subsequent ops that went sideways.
 
#14
I don’t think under estimated is the way to put it. They are just more low key compared to the Seals. Which is not a bad thing.
Seconded. Regrettably, too many SEALs appear to have forgotten the SOCOM's self-characterization as "the silent professionals."

Personally, I attribute this to the close proximity of their main training base to Hollywood.
 
#15
Seconded. Regrettably, too many SEALs appear to have forgotten the SOCOM's self-characterization as "the silent professionals."

Personally, I attribute this to the close proximity of their main training base to Hollywood.
The media attention does not help in the least bit. The Seals have had some issues, and those few folks bring to much unwanted attention to their organization.
 
#16
The media attention does not help in the least bit. The Seals have had some issues, and those few folks bring to much unwanted attention to their organization.
True. My contacts in other special operations units pretty much roll their eyes with all the media hype, much preferring the shadows.
 
#18
True. My contacts in other special operations units pretty much roll their eyes with all the media hype, much preferring the shadows.
I gather most of the USN SEAL community feel the same. The son of a long term friend is a LCDR in a SEAL team (east coast) and I know the father hates to see publicity about SEALs and says the son does also. I have not seen the boy since he was still a ROTC midshipman.

I do suspect that as a Marine you must be happy with a lot at the Pentagon now. SECDEF, James Mattis is a Marine, GEN Joseph Dunford, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs, is a Marine. Dunford, BTW, comes from a long line of senior Boston PD officers, well respected in Boston.
Last year Owen West, another Marine, was appointed Asst DECDEF for Special Operations. He was commissioned out of Harvard ROTC. After his USMC service he was an investment banker with Goldman but took leaves from Goldman twice to go back on active duty with USMC in Iraq and once to climb Everest.
The apple did not fall far from the tree. Owen's dad was Bing West, a Marine who served in Vietnam and was Asst SECDEF under Reagan. (both are authors by the way)
The Marines seem to be doing well in the Pentagon.
 
#19
Operation Anaconda in the Shahikot Valley.
The book, 'Not A Good Day To Die' by Sean Naylor gives a blow by blow account of the whole operation. I recommend it.
As with all these types of operation everybody wanted a piece of the action. And as invariably happens when everyone (including those who shouldn't be there) gets involved, it turned into a cluster.
There were so many different levels of command with everyone guarding their own turf that it was inevitable that, IMHO, it would end in tears. The commanding General wasn't even on the same Continent as where the action was taking place.
There was a complete underestimation of the enemy numbers and capability.
The operation was partly saved by a handful of SF type operators on foot high up on the mountain. They at least contributed to reducing the casualty count.
As so many have said, Sgt. Chapman was a very brave man. In fact there were many brave acts during the action. Such a pity that it was let down by the intransigence and ineptitude of people who should have known better.
 
#20
Operation Anaconda in the Shahikot Valley.
The book, 'Not A Good Day To Die' by Sean Naylor gives a blow by blow account of the whole operation. I recommend it.
As with all these types of operation everybody wanted a piece of the action. And as invariably happens when everyone (including those who shouldn't be there) gets involved, it turned into a cluster.
There were so many different levels of command with everyone guarding their own turf that it was inevitable that, IMHO, it would end in tears. The commanding General wasn't even on the same Continent as where the action was taking place.
There was a complete underestimation of the enemy numbers and capability.
The operation was partly saved by a handful of SF type operators on foot high up on the mountain. They at least contributed to reducing the casualty count.
As so many have said, Sgt. Chapman was a very brave man. In fact there were many brave acts during the action. Such a pity that it was let down by the intransigence and ineptitude of people who should have known better.
Operation Anaconda in the Shahikot Valley.
The book, 'Not A Good Day To Die' by Sean Naylor gives a blow by blow account of the whole operation. I recommend it.
As with all these types of operation everybody wanted a piece of the action. And as invariably happens when everyone (including those who shouldn't be there) gets involved, it turned into a cluster.
There were so many different levels of command with everyone guarding their own turf that it was inevitable that, IMHO, it would end in tears. The commanding General wasn't even on the same Continent as where the action was taking place.
There was a complete underestimation of the enemy numbers and capability.
The operation was partly saved by a handful of SF type operators on foot high up on the mountain. They at least contributed to reducing the casualty count.
As so many have said, Sgt. Chapman was a very brave man. In fact there were many brave acts during the action. Such a pity that it was let down by the intransigence and ineptitude of people who should have known better.
Very insightful post.
 

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