US troops ordered to ignore Afghan allies pederast tendancies

#1
The reason we were here is because we heard the terrible things the Taliban were doing to people, how they were taking away human rights,” said Dan Quinn, a former Special Forces captain who beat up an American-backed militia commander for keeping a boy chained to his bed as a sex slave. “But we were putting people into power who would do things that were worse than the Taliban did — that was something village elders voiced to me.”

The policy of instructing soldiers to ignore child sexual abuse by their Afghan allies is coming under new scrutiny, particularly as it emerges that service members like Captain Quinn have faced discipline, even career ruin, for disobeying it.

After the beating, the Army relieved Captain Quinn of his command and pulled him from Afghanistan. He has since left the military.


http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/21/w...-ignore-afghan-allies-abuse-of-boys.html?_r=0

Hardly news but the issue is finally gaining traction in the US, at the cost of some good men's careers, every other military in theatre has done pretty much the same .

Putting a very robust stop to this sort of thing was one of the reasons why the Taliban were popular originally and the reason why they are the only people to go to for real redress in these situations
 
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#2
The reason we were here is because we heard the terrible things the Taliban were doing to people, how they were taking away human rights,” said Dan Quinn, a former Special Forces captain who beat up an American-backed militia commander for keeping a boy chained to his bed as a sex slave. “But we were putting people into power who would do things that were worse than the Taliban did — that was something village elders voiced to me.”

The policy of instructing soldiers to ignore child sexual abuse by their Afghan allies is coming under new scrutiny, particularly as it emerges that service members like Captain Quinn have faced discipline, even career ruin, for disobeying it.

After the beating, the Army relieved Captain Quinn of his command and pulled him from Afghanistan. He has since left the military.


http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/21/w...-ignore-afghan-allies-abuse-of-boys.html?_r=0

Hardly news but the issue is finally gaining traction in the US, at the cost of some good men's careers, every other military in theatre has done pretty much the same .

Putting a very robust stop to this sort of thing was one of the reasons why the Taliban were popular originally and the reason why they are the only people to go to for real redress in these situations
For want of moral courage, the war was lost...
 
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#3
The place by and large is still stuck in the stoneage. Here come a report of lynching in Kabul, someone accused someone of burning a Koran and that was it, she stood no chance and the Police just stood by and watched. It ain't going to become and enlightened hippy paradise any time soon either.

What a sad and bad joke, we should have left the rotten place alone, it was not worth the bones of one good soldier/airman.

Kabul lynching: 'Killed for speaking her mind' - BBC News
 
#4
As you say this is a subject that is gaining traction...


While this was some time ago and I can only hope that the ANA has had time to root this out, and deal properly with much of this for themselves, with the mentoring that has taken place since, 2012 when this Vice report was produced.

The reality is that abuse and acceptance of abuse in many forms has been and is ingrained in that particular culture. we cannot hope to change that for them they must want to change themselves.
 
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#5
Putting a very robust stop to this sort of thing was one of the reasons why the Taliban were popular originally and the reason why they are the only people to go to for real redress in these situations
How sure are you that is actually true? The impression I get was that it was very like the Provos 'Direct Action Against Drugs', in that they went after everyone they didn't like who was doing it in a very public way while carrying on doing it themselves behind the scenes.
 
#6
Word on the street is that it's rife in Afghanistan and found amongst all groups.

It was reportedly going on all over the place in Iraq where anything with an exit/entrance was being subjected to the attentions of Iraqi wrongc0cks.

Some of these people have to leap through some pretty complicated hoops of logic to justify what they do in countries where homosexuality, paedophilia and beastiality are supposedly illegal.
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
#7
The place by and large is still stuck in the stoneage. Here come a report of lynching in Kabul, someone accused someone of burning a Koran and that was it, she stood no chance and the Police just stood by and watched. It ain't going to become and enlightened hippy paradise any time soon either.

What a sad and bad joke, we should have left the rotten place alone, it was not worth the bones of one good soldier/airman.

Kabul lynching: 'Killed for speaking her mind' - BBC News
Amen to that.

I'd be interested to know if anyone who served in Iraq or Afghanistan ever received a briefing anywhere that suggested those tasked with the higher direction of the war, politically or militarily, ever had the slightest idea of what final victory looked like or how what we were doing would or could ever deliver such a victory.

As far as I can tell, both missions deteriorated into aimless bimbling about whilst the liberal chatterati insisted on unworkable ROEs and the avoidance of anything which might remotely look like basic civilised standards being imposed on a pack of murderous savages, and all this while risk-averse politicians tried to find the exit door, senior commanders struggled with complex speak the truth v keep your job dilemmas and everybody responsible for the whole horrible mess blustered about how it was all somehow a great and glorious triumph.

We are happy to teach the importance of the Moral Component and we seem equally happy to undermine it through politically correct temporising when on operations. Hopefully Captain Quinn will find a wiser employer.
 
#8
Amen to that.

I'd be interested to know if anyone who served in Iraq or Afghanistan ever received a briefing anywhere that suggested those tasked with the higher direction of the war, politically or militarily, ever had the slightest idea of what final victory looked like or how what we were doing would or could ever deliver such a victory.

As far as I can tell, both missions deteriorated into aimless bimbling about whilst the liberal chatterati insisted on unworkable ROEs and the avoidance of anything which might remotely look like basic civilised standards being imposed on a pack of murderous savages, and all this while risk-averse politicians tried to find the exit door, senior commanders struggled with complex speak the truth v keep your job dilemmas and everybody responsible for the whole horrible mess blustered about how it was all somehow a great and glorious triumph.

We are happy to teach the importance of the Moral Component and we seem equally happy to undermine it through politically correct temporising when on operations. Hopefully Captain Quinn will find a wiser employer.
I do hope you don't get killed for that.
 
#9
The reality is that [INSERT ANY ONE OF A MULTITUDE OF SINS HERE] in many forms has been and is ingrained in that particular culture. we cannot hope to change that for them they must want to change themselves.
fill in the blank . . . you would likely not be wrong, and you would likely touch on one of the many reasons why the West is not going to come out of Afghanistan looking any more successful than did the Sovs.

Mentor away till doomsday, you've as much chance of changing the tribal culture of the region, as would [say] the Americans if they tried to eliminate racist soccer hooliganism among Chelsea fans, by sending trainers to mentor Foot Guards in Knightsbridge Barracks.
 

Caecilius

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#10
How sure are you that is actually true? The impression I get was that it was very like the Provos 'Direct Action Against Drugs', in that they went after everyone they didn't like who was doing it in a very public way while carrying on doing it themselves behind the scenes.
This is absolutely the case. The idea that the Taliban provided any real kind of security or improvement to people's lives other than extreme oppression is just their propaganda at work. Like any other afghan, they smoked, drank, did drugs and bummed small boys. The difference was that they acted as the moral police for everyone else while doing it.
 
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#11
How sure are you that is actually true? The impression I get was that it was very like the Provos 'Direct Action Against Drugs', in that they went after everyone they didn't like who was doing it in a very public way while carrying on doing it themselves behind the scenes.
Or get rid of the competition
 
#12
We are happy to teach the importance of the Moral Component and we seem equally happy to undermine it through politically correct temporising when on operations. Hopefully Captain Quinn will find a wiser employer.
Yep, as you know I trained the Iraqi plod working for ArmorGroup. Every month, in camp Smitty, Samawah, Iraq we would have an Int briefing about current enemy TTPs including ATO who one fine Thursday evening rolled out the Iraqi version of a 'TPU' (Time and Power Unit). This was a very nifty little device that could utilise a PIR or a command wire and had various lights and instructions printed on it. But no, it wasn't the nasty Iranians supplying kit to murder our troops, we were really supposed to believe they were knocking this shit out, and the EFPs, in their ******* garages!
 
#13
Yep, as you know I trained the Iraqi plod working for ArmorGroup. Every month, in camp Smitty, Samawah, Iraq we would have an Int briefing about current enemy TTPs including ATO who one fine Thursday evening rolled out the Iraqi version of a 'TPU' (Time and Power Unit). This was a very nifty little device that could utilise a PIR or a command wire and had various lights and instructions printed on it. But no, it wasn't the nasty Iranians supplying kit to murder our troops, we were really supposed to believe they were knocking this shit out, and the EFPs, in their ******* garages!
My bold. Eh?
 
#14
TTP Tactics Techniques Procedures
PIR Passive Infra Red (sensors)
EFP Explosively Formed Penetrator/Projectile.


But you know ATO?!
 
#19
A new development, something is very, very wrong

Green Beret axed for rescuing Afghan child sex slave

Sergeant Charles Martland has been refused leave to appeal after he was discharged from the US military for confronting an Afghan police commander over the rape of a young boy

Green Beret axed for rescuing Afghan child sex slave


White House spokesman Josh Earnest said: "The United States is deeply concerned about the safety and welfare of Afghan boys who may be exploited by members of the Afghan national security and defence forces.

"This form of sexual exploitation violates Afghan law and Afghanistan's international obligations. More broadly, protecting human rights, including by countering the exploitation of children, is a high priority for the US government."

 

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