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US Public TV Serioes on Afghanistan War

#3
FiveAlpha said:
I'm a fan of the frontline documentaries. I watched the 24 minute 'snippet' on their site the other day. Looks like a good programme.
That is the buzz but in view of their previous inability to walk the straight and narrow in various touchy (political) subjects, watch and listen to the information but then verify it.
 
#4
Watching it now. McC's point of clearing an area and not maintaining the "hold" can sometimes be worse than not clearing it in the first place because clearing it means you create expectations that do do not live up to. [slightly paraphrased]

Even though some of these operations (battles) have lasted for 30 to 40 days, in the life of Afghanistan they're just raids. If you are the locals sitting on the fence, which side will come down on?

How many hours lead does GMT have on Georgia? (too lazy to look it up)
 
#5
The move to protect the population instead of (necessarily) going after the Taliban is just by the book, makes good sense, and this time the Marines are there to stay.

Unfortunately, the population fled the scene and the Taliban have threatened them if they go back.

"Connecting with the people sounded a lot easier back in Washington."

Hmm, great to get a reality check from the frontlines(!), thanks for posting this JJ.

Edited to add last sentence.
 
#6
Sun_Too said:
Watching it now. McC's point of clearing an area and not maintaining the "hold" can sometimes be worse than not clearing it in the first place because clearing it means you create expectations that do do not live up to. [slightly paraphrased]

Even though some of these operations (battles) have lasted for 30 to 40 days, in the life of Afghanistan they're just raids. If you are the locals sitting on the fence, which side will come down on?

How many hours lead does GMT have on Georgia? (too lazy to look it up)
We are 5 hours behind (and 100 years culturally).
 
#9
This apeared in the small town where the Marine was from who is shown in the show after being mortally wounded. How young he was....

Death of local Marine is part of new PBS documentary

Lance Cpl. Seth Sharp

Shortly before U.S. Marines began their operation earlier this month in Afghanistan's Helmand province, a member of the unit known as "America's Battalion" wrote a letter to his grandmother. Lance Cpl. Charles Seth Sharp of the 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, wrote that he would soon be fighting in a mission his grandchildren would learn about in history class. Sharp was among some 4,000 Marines deployed by helicopter and armored transport throughout the volatile Helmand River valley in an effort to counter the Taliban insurgency.

Just days after he mailed the letter, Sharp, 20, died in battle. He was the first Marine killed in the offensive. Last week, Sharp was buried in his hometown of Adairsville, in rural northwestern Georgia. The Northpointe Church in Adairsville was packed. For 3 ½ hours, the line of people waiting to view Sharp's casket extended into the parking lot. The family stood next to the casket, hugging every well wisher who came through. Behind them, a giant screen displayed pictures of Sharp.

In most of these pictures, as a teen, or even as a boy, Sharp never displayed a full smile. He just grinned, and flashed a few teeth. "We got three little teeth, and a laugh, and that was it," recalls his father, Ric Sharp.It didn't show up in photos, but Sharp was playful and a bit of a mischief maker, friends and family say. As the sun went down outside the church, his friends, including Justin Hooper and Patrick Maolin took turns telling stories of getting into trouble with Sharp, who went by his middle name Seth, small kinds of trouble really. "It was my cousin Justin, and Seth, and they were chewing tobacco. And I was like, man I want some of that. I put a big ol' pinch in my mouth," Maolin recalls. "And ooh, I got sicker than a dog."Ric Sharp says his some was a character, but never into anything bad. "He didn't mind having fun… I know I come home one day, and the sheriff's car's in my driveway. And I'm thinking, ‘Oh Lord, what have these kids done now?’ And the sheriff's out there with four of his buddies in my backyard. They've been hitting golf balls down in the woods, and they didn't realize someone was building their house down there, and the lady was afraid they were going to hit the house or, more importantly, hit their kids," he says.

But when Seth turned 17, he made a big decision. Seth was looking to become more serious and straighten up. His dad had told him to go to school and get a job, or join the military. The Sept. 11, 2001, attacks had a lot to do with Seth's decision to join the Marines. He told everyone he wanted to the toughest assignment he could get. His stepmother, Tiffany Sharp, was scared about the whole thing. She tried to talk him out of it. "Yes, I said go into another one, or go into the Navy, go out in a boat, and that way you're not Marines, infantry. And I was like ‘I just don't know what I'm gonna do with this youngin'.’ But, you know, that's where his heart was," she says.After basic training, his family says Seth matured in a hurry. He got engaged. His fiance was able to get a big smile out of him in all of the pictures he took with her. Those pictures of Seth, with his strong jaw, steely blue eyes, and big smile, are on the Sharp's kitchen table. Beside the photos are newspaper reports about his death, letters from well wishers, and the flag that draped their son's coffin when his body was returned home from Afghanistan.

http://www.communityradar.com/story.php?title=video-mourning-a-marine-lance-cpl-charles-seth-sharp
 

Andy_S

LE
Book Reviewer
#10
SNIP
General McChrystal doesn’t hide the bitterness in his voice as he describes having to take back Helmand Province all over again. “Once you clear something and don’t hold it, you probably didn’t clear it, it has no staying power,” he says. “ In fact I would argue that it’s worse, because you create an expectation and then you dash it. And so I think that you’re almost better to have not gone there at all.”
SNIP

This comment from McChrystal sounds like it could be a slap at the British mission there, pre- the recent Marine deployment.

For eg: This blurb from a recent UK book on Afghan ("Attack State Red"):
Supported by air strikes, artillery, mortars, Scimitars, tracked troop carriers and Javelin missiles; often resupplied by heavy parachute drop; the platoons sniped, blasted, machine-gunned, grenaded and bayoneted their way across the desert and through the jungle-like Green Zone
 

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