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US Military May Be Forced to go to Standard Camo Pattern Across All Services

#11
I believe the USMC Marpat™ design would be a popular choice for other arms of service (except for the little eagle, globe and anchor built in to the design), but the USMC owns the design it so the other services can't use it.

There's a great quote on the Wiki page:

MARPAT is also important in that it identifies warfighters as Marines to their enemies, while its camouflage simultaneously helps Marines to remain concealed.

This was demonstrated by a Marine Spokesman who, when MARPAT was launched, said,
"We want to be instantly recognized as a force to be reckoned with. We want them to see us coming a mile away in our new uniforms".

Isn't wearing camo supposed to make that difficult?
 
#12
I believe the USMC Marpat™ design would be a popular choice for other arms of service (except for the little eagle, globe and anchor built in to the design), but the USMC owns the design it so the other services can't use it.

There's a great quote on the Wiki page:

MARPAT is also important in that it identifies warfighters as Marines to their enemies, while its camouflage simultaneously helps Marines to remain concealed.

This was demonstrated by a Marine Spokesman who, when MARPAT was launched, said,
"We want to be instantly recognized as a force to be reckoned with. We want them to see us coming a mile away in our new uniforms".

Isn't wearing camo supposed to make that difficult?
It's a Marine form of (il)logic.


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#13
Look at history. When the most successful army in the world was at its most successful, they wore red tunics.

You win wars by killing the enemy, not by hiding from them. And you win the peace with razor-sharp creases and shiny boots.

Harrumph!
 
#14
My personal view is that you only need three colours of uniform - white, khaki and olive green - depending on the environment. "Camouflage" patterns don't improve invisibility when a soldier moves or is silhouetted and natural shadow (either from surrounding objects or from himself) will provide the effect that multi-colouring of fabric strives to attain. You'll get the multi-colour effect just by having his equipment a slightly different shade.

Compared to the landscape, a soldier is a tiny entity. Making good use of cover reduces his visible size even more.
 
#15
Look at history. When the most successful army in the world was at its most successful, they wore red tunics.

You win wars by killing the enemy, not by hiding from them. And you win the peace with razor-sharp creases and shiny boots*.

Harrumph!
*and white painted rocks adorning the edges of all the paths within the CP that in turn become lethal projectiles when the CP is mortared. BRILLIANT!


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#17
Blue camp at sea was a brilliant idea when a man/woman goes overboard in the BIG blue sea!

Apparently its to conceal oil and grease stains.

But I've always thought it was a bit mental to see 4 different uniforms out in Afghan, especially when the Air Force and Army seem to have adopted one best suited to fighting on the moon?!
 
#18
Apparently its to conceal oil and grease stains.

But I've always thought it was a bit mental to see 4 different uniforms out in Afghan, especially when the Air Force and Army seem to have adopted one best suited to fighting on the moon?!

I agree as to the need for uniform appearance. However, with no disrespect to my British friends the British Army has the least uniform uniforms of any uniformed service. I have seen groups with red tunics with blue trousers, blue tunics with red trousers, various tartan trousers or skirts for the women, kilts for the men, green trousers. I think it is interesting the respect to the traditions but hardly uniform.
 
#19
I agree as to the need for uniform appearance. However, with no disrespect to my British friends the British Army has the least uniform uniforms of any uniformed service. I have seen groups with red tunics with blue trousers, blue tunics with red trousers, various tartan trousers or skirts for the women, kilts for the men, green trousers. I think it is interesting the respect to the traditions but hardly uniform.
To a large extent that's traditional and ceremonial uniform. All three services use the same combat uniform.

What strikes as strange is that the expensive and least robust (yes, daft, isn't it?) combat uniform is required to be worn in non-tactical situations - e.g. UK barracks.
 
#20
To a large extent that's traditional and ceremonial uniform. All three services use the same combat uniform. What strikes as strange is that the expensive and least robust (yes, daft, isn't it?) combat uniform is required to be worn in non-tactical situations - e.g. UK barracks.
In the US there have been many variations over the years. The (now former) wife was a USN/USNR officer for a total of 22 years. When first in there was a uniform called "salt and pepper" with black pants and white shirt. The wife hated it as it looked very much like the Boston meter maids and she would be walking to lunch with people chasing her waving tickets and moaning and bitching. The new Navy Service uniform for enlisted looks like shit IMHO and I understand has not been that well received by sailors. Looks like piccy below but the khaki variant.

new_usn_uniform2.jpg


I always thought the UK uniform variants were interesting. When a young boy a friend of my mum's brought back from England a book called "Regiments at a Glance" which had brief histories and pictures of many regiments.
 

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