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US Marines to all have suppressors

Well apparently you can get a silencer for .50 cal rifles. Target shooters use them to reduce the sound to a slightly more comfortable level.
If the USMC want I can tell them how to silence their grenade launchers as well.
Believe it or not, the Germans have suppressors for 155mm artillery.

So as not to upset the neighbours.
 
Well apparently you can get a silencer for .50 cal rifles. Target shooters use them to reduce the sound to a slightly more comfortable level.
If the USMC want I can tell them how to silence their grenade launchers as well.

The really impressive trick would be to silence the grenades so that instead of going bang they go pop.
 
Why don’t they design a new barrel for the M4 incorporating sound suppression?

Question for those firearms guru’s, do suppressors come at the expense of velocity or no significant difference as they are on the end of the normal barrel?
No difference, muzzle velocity is the same, the sights will still work.
It's only a space for the gas to expand into and slow down to sub-sonic speeds, significantly reducing the 'thud' of the weapon firing. The super-sonic bullet still makes a 'crack' sound.
Car silencers work the same way, in fact they were invented by the same man, Hiram Maxim's son.
Have you ever heard a car with no silencer? It's that sort of difference.
 

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The U.S. Marine Corps is fielding tens of thousands of suppressors designed for automatic rifles as a move to reduce noise signature on the modern battlefield, according to Military.com.

Marine Corps Systems Command (MCSC) is in the process of fielding the first of the suppressors designed for M4 and M4A1 carbines and M27 infantry automatic rifles to Marines stationed at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. By 2023, the service expects as many as 30,000 suppressors will be fielded, which is the largest deployment of suppressors by any military.

Suppressors on automatic rifles firing a 5.56mm round will reduce noise by 30-40 decibels. This means each shot will sound more like a 22 caliber.

Reducing noise adds stealth to Marines, making it harder for the enemy to locate them.

Suppressors help decrease their "audible and visual signature, making it more difficult for the enemy to ascertain their location," Chief Warrant Officer 4 David Tomlinson, MCSC's infantry weapons officer, said in the release.

Besides reducing sound, suppressors also eliminate muzzle flash, which adds to the stealthiness of Marines.


Does the SA80's action function correctly with a suppressor?

Let's ask The Internet Magic 8-Ball:

8ball.PNG


Conclusive proof, I'd say.

Case closed.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
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theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
The really impressive trick would be to silence the grenades so that instead of going bang they go pop.

Well I know how to make a silenced grenade launcher, without sticking a giant moderator on the end of the barrel. Of course, as you say the boom at the other end is the problem.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
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Well I know how to make a silenced grenade launcher, without sticking a giant moderator on the end of the barrel. Of course, as you say the boom at the other end is the problem.

Cross bow? Such as big Joe?

Little Joe was a bit Frankenstein
large_DI_2016_0510.jpg
 

tgo

War Hero
Why don’t they design a new barrel for the M4 incorporating sound suppression?

Question for those firearms guru’s, do suppressors come at the expense of velocity or no significant difference as they are on the end of the normal barrel?
Bullets fired through suppressors are generally subsonic to avoid the 'crack' of the bullet breaking the sound barrier, so they'll be a bit slower coming out of the barrel, maybe get more bullet drop over long ranges due to slower speed, probably not a big issue for the shortish ranges these types of long are used at though.
 

Bubbles_Barker

LE
Book Reviewer
Bullets fired through suppressors are generally subsonic to avoid the 'crack' of the bullet breaking the sound barrier, so they'll be a bit slower coming out of the barrel, maybe get more bullet drop over long ranges due to slower speed, probably not a big issue for the shortish ranges these types of long are used at though.
In modern suppressors if there is any drop in MV at all it is very small. Felt recoil is also reduced. Suppressors do wear relatively quickly though I think.
 
Bullets fired through suppressors are generally subsonic to avoid the 'crack' of the bullet breaking the sound barrier, so they'll be a bit slower coming out of the barrel, maybe get more bullet drop over long ranges due to slower speed, probably not a big issue for the shortish ranges these types of long are used at though.
That's a different can of worms. Suppressed/silenced pistol calibre weapons (DeLisle, Welrod, Mk5 Sterling, Sten MkII(S) & Mk VI) usually use sub-sonic ammunition to avoid the crack. The Sterling & Sten had drilled barrels to vent some of the gas and so make standard 9mm ammo sub-sonic. The pistol's MV is usually close to, or less than, the speed of sound anyway, it doesn't make a lot of difference.

The rear sight for the Mk5 Sterling looked similar (other than the bunch of holes around the rearsight aperture) but was different to the standard Mk4 SMG sight because of the differences in muzzle velocity.

You just can't avoid the crack with rifle ammunition, you can only reduce the noise caused by gas being released from the weapon on firing. It makes the firer harder to find and reduces hearing damage.
 
As troops exposed to brine, are the Royal Marines still being equipped with the corrosion-prone SA80?


The performance of even the A3 with a suppressor is said to be marginal

suppressed SA80
 
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