US, Iraqi forces kill 30 Iranian-backed Special Operatives

Discussion in 'Multinational HQ' started by Trip_Wire, Aug 9, 2007.

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  1. Trip_Wire

    Trip_Wire RIP

  2. Thats great news!! I think I will drink to their deaths!!!
  3. One thing Jonesy is, that you obviously have no combat experience...

    You wouldn't drink to their deats as they believe in what they fight for!

    I don't like them but I don't HATE them either - why don't you look for an USA glorification web presence?! :x
  4. You will see a lot more of this bullshit emanating from sites like Fourth Rail as the Septics attempt to Ra-Ra "The Surge" into a success in time for Petraeus' September report.

    Keep an eye on Colin Powell and his former CoS.....they have the ability to call bullshit on the entire deal.

  5. Trip_Wire

    Trip_Wire RIP

    Well, I have combat experience and I'd toast to their their deaths! :x

    They are the enemy and their expertise, is causing many deaths for Iraqi, American and Yes Brits too.

    Just what is it 'they believe in?' :?

    How many POWs have they captured and not killed? How many be-headings of innocent civilians?

    I'm sure that if the shoe was on the other foot, they would drink to our deaths!

    I say good riddence and burn in hell, if there is such a place! :evil: :x

    Just a reminder:

    Two UK soldiers die in bomb blast
    Aug 9 2007

    Two British soldiers have been killed in Iraq - the latest casualties in a devastating week for UK forces, which have suffered four deaths in the past three days.

    The soldiers from the 1st Battalion Irish Guards were killed when an improvised explosive device (IED) detonated next to their patrol. Another two soldiers were seriously injured in the attacks.

    The Ministry of Defence said that the soldiers were travelling in a convoy to the north Rumaylah oil fields, west of the southern Iraqi city of Basra.

    News of the latest casualties came as the MoD released the name of a British serviceman killed in the city on Tuesday night.

    Leading Aircraftman Martin Beard, 20, of No 1 Squadron Royal Air Force Regiment was shot during a routine foot patrol in the Al Waki district north of the British Base at Basra Airport.
  6. Trip_Wire

    Trip_Wire RIP

    I'll join you! :wink:

    Death to the enemy!
  7. Mad why would I not drink to the deaths of a bunch of feckbags that kill American and British soldiers, I would not only drink to their deaths but piss on their graves. Then again your right I spose I should respect people that are unworthy of it and feel heartfelt sorrow that will not be able to kill anymore of our troops...........
  8. They probably need to. Expect a concerted offensive/mass bombings next month as the opposition attempts to convince the anti-surge folks to pull out and to discredit anything positive Patraeus may say in that report.

  9. Trip Wire - fill yer boots with as much sabre rattling ' drink to their deaths' nonsense as you like if it makes you happy.

    Top tip though, don't come on arrse and give the largely 1. British and 2. Services/ex services 'Just a reminder' about our casualties as if we don't know already and hint/suggest that by not wishing to 'piss on their graves' we do our compatriots a disservice. Thank you very much.

    It's not likely to do much for our 'special relationship' me ole china.
  10. Schaden

    Schaden LE Book Reviewer

  11. So maybe it's 1 Iranian backed special operative, his wife, 3 kids, their dog, their neighbours, their neighbour's dog, the bloke who sits on the corner staring at his sandals, a family passing on a cart and any hope of ever seeing someone from that village on our side as long as we've holes in our arrse.
  12. they may be what you call "the enemy" yet like any other soldier they to are pawns In a far bigger network.

    maybe they believe our beliefs are wrong to, as we believe theirs to be.

    yet the interference from iran is getting out of hand, if it wasn't them it would only be us that would be killed .

    Cheney urging military strikes on Iran

    WASHINGTON — President Bush charged Thursday that Iran continues to arm and train insurgents who are killing U.S. soldiers in Iraq, and he threatened action if that continues.

    At a news conference Thursday, Bush said Iran had been warned of unspecified consequences if it continued its alleged support for anti-American forces in Iraq. U.S. Ambassador to Iraq Ryan Crocker had conveyed the warning in meetings with his Iranian counterpart in Baghdad, the president said.

    Bush wasn't specific, and a State Department official refused to elaborate on the warning.

    Behind the scenes, however, the president's top aides have been engaged in an intensive internal debate over how to respond to Iran's support for Shiite Muslim groups in Iraq and its nuclear program. Vice President Dick Cheney several weeks ago proposed launching airstrikes at suspected training camps in Iraq run by the Quds force, a special unit of the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps, according to two U.S. officials who are involved in Iran policy.

    The debate has been accompanied by a growing drumbeat of allegations about Iranian meddling in Iraq from U.S. military officers, administration officials and administration allies outside government and in the news media. It isn't clear whether the media campaign is intended to build support for limited military action against Iran, to pressure the Iranians to curb their support for Shiite groups in Iraq or both.

    Nor is it clear from the evidence the administration has presented whether Iran, which has long-standing ties to several Iraqi Shiite groups, including the Mahdi Army of radical cleric Muqtada al Sadr and the Badr Organization, which is allied with the U.S.-backed government of Prime Minister Nouri al Maliki, is a major cause of the anti-American and sectarian violence in Iraq or merely one of many. At other times, administration officials have blamed the Sunni Muslim group al Qaida in Iraq for much of the violence.

    For now, however, the president appears to have settled on a policy of stepped-up military operations in Iraq aimed at the suspected Iranian networks there, combined with direct American-Iranian talks in Baghdad to try to persuade Tehran to halt its alleged meddling.

    The U.S. military launched one such raid Wednesday in Baghdad's predominantly Shiite Sadr City district.

    But so far that course has failed to halt what American military officials say is a flow of sophisticated roadside bombs, known as explosively formed penetrators, into Iraq. Last month they accounted for a third of the combat deaths among U.S.-led forces, according to the military.

    Cheney, who's long been skeptical of diplomacy with Iran, argued for military action if hard new evidence emerges of Iran's complicity in supporting anti-American forces in Iraq; for example, catching a truckload of fighters or weapons crossing into Iraq from Iran, one official said.

    The two officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they weren't authorized to talk publicly about internal government deliberations.

    Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice opposes this idea, the officials said. Defense Secretary Robert Gates has stated publicly that "we think we can handle this inside the borders of Iraq."

    Lea Anne McBride, a Cheney spokeswoman, said only that "the vice president is right where the president is" on Iran policy.

    Bush left no doubt at his news conference that he intended to get tough with Iran.

    "One of the main reasons that I asked Ambassador Crocker to meet with Iranians inside Iraq was to send the message that there will be consequences for . . . people transporting, delivering EFPs, highly sophisticated IEDs (improvised explosive devices), that kill Americans in Iraq," he said.

    He also appeared to call on the Iranian people to change their government.

    "My message to the Iranian people is, you can do better than this current government," he said. "You don't have to be isolated. You don't have to be in a position where you can't realize your full economic potential."

    The Bush administration has launched what appears to be a coordinated campaign to pin more of Iraq's security troubles on Iran.

    Last week, Lt. Gen. Raymond Odierno, the No. 2 U.S. military commander in Iraq, said Shiite militiamen had launched 73 percent of the attacks that had killed or wounded American troops in July. U.S. officials think that majority Shiite Iran is providing militiamen with EFPs, which pierce armored vehicles and explode once inside.

    Last month, Brig. Gen. Kevin Bergner, a multinational force spokesman, said members of the Quds force had helped plan a January attack in the holy Shiite city of Karbala, which lead to the deaths of five American soldiers. Bergner said the military had evidence that some of the attackers had trained at Quds camps near Tehran.

    Bush's efforts to pressure Iran are complicated by the fact that the leaders of U.S.-supported governments in Iraq and Afghanistan have a more nuanced view of their neighbor.

    Maliki is on a three-day visit to Tehran, during which he was photographed Wednesday hand in hand with Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. Unconfirmed media reports said Maliki had told Iranian officials they'd played a constructive role in the region.

    Asked about that, Bush said he hadn't been briefed on the meeting. "Now if the signal is that Iran is constructive, I will have to have a heart-to-heart with my friend the prime minister, because I don't believe they are constructive. I don't think he in his heart of hearts thinks they're constructive either," he said.

    Bush and Afghan President Hamid Karzai differed on Iran's role when they met last weekend, with Karzai saying in a TV interview that Iran was "a helper" and Bush challenging that view.

    The toughening U.S. position on Iran puts Karzai and Iraqi leaders such as Maliki in a difficult spot between Iran, their longtime ally, and the United States, which is spending lives and treasure to secure their newly formed government.

    A senior Iraqi official in Baghdad said the Iraqi government received regular intelligence briefings from the United States about suspected Iranian activities. He refused to discuss details, but said the American position worried him.

    The United States is "becoming more focused on Iranian influence inside Iraq," said the official, who requested anonymity to discuss private talks with the Americans. "And we don't want Iraq to become a zone of conflict between Iran and the U.S."

    Proposals to use force against Iran over its actions in Iraq mark a new phase in the Bush administration's long internal war over Iran policy.

    Until now, some hawks within the administration — including Cheney — are said to have favored military strikes to stop Iran from furthering its suspected ambitions for nuclear weapons.

    Rice has championed a diplomatic strategy, but that, too, has failed to deter Iran so far.

    Patrick Clawson, an Iran specialist at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, said a strike on the Quds camps in Iran could make the nuclear diplomacy more difficult.

    Before launching such a strike, "We better be prepared to go public with very detailed and very convincing intelligence," Clawson said.
  14. Trip_Wire

    Trip_Wire RIP


    I think you misunderstand my mention of your losses. You are dead wrong!