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US Insignia

#1
Has been puzzling me for a while, why is the US flag that their 'soldiers' wear back to front, you know with the stars on the wrong side? I had a theory that it was so when they looked at themsleves looking 'bad-ass' in the mirror they wouldn't get confused by it but that can't be it.
Any sensible suggestions? Or am i being a mong?
 
#2
I was lead to believe it's worn that way so that the flag is always advancing, stars to the front, no matter which arm it's worn on.

Steiner
 
#3
but if the stars are facing forward on the right arm, the same badge on the left arm would result in the stars facing backwards. Or do you meant hey have a different badge depending on which arm they wear it on? Do they not always wear it one a particular side?
 
#5
It is not immediattly obvious and I suspect most septics would not know why either.

The way to think about it is to imagine a rank of soldiers with the colour party to the front like so:

0(|)0
------------------------------

When observed from the right hand side of the squad, the fly of the colour is behind the flagpole and the colour looks reversed, hence in the case of the US flag the upper canton (the stars bit) closest to the pole and looks the "wrong " way around.

As the US patch is worn on the right shoulder, the notional flag pole is to the right (facing forward), the fly is behind the flagpole and thus the badge shows the flag is reversed from normal. If worn on the left it would be shown in the usual way.
 
#6
Sgt_Steiner said:
Two different badges I believe.
It should be.

The flags should be flying (i.e worn with the flag pole side forward) , so you need a left and a right one.

BUT the septics love to create lots of rules and regulations, then are unable to follow them.
 
#7
http://www.ushistory.org/betsy/flagetiq.html
To wear our country's flag properly, the field of stars should be worn closest to your heart. Thus, if your patch is to be worn on your LEFT sleeve, use a left flag. For patches worn on your RIGHT sleeve, use a "right" or "reversed field" flag. Since the law does not specifically address the positioning of the patch, a decision is left to the discretion of the organization prescribing the wear. Some elect to use the "left" flag on both sleeves. [Note: many states and cities have ordinances pertaining to the use of the flag; you may wish to contact the Attorney General of your state or the City Attorney's office regarding this matter.] If you are planning to wear only one patch, it is recommended that you wear a "left" flag on your left sleeve. Military guidelines specify that in support of joint or multi-national operations, the "right" flag is worn on the right sleeve, 1/4" below the shoulder seam or 1/8" below any required unit patches.
Source: Army Website FAQs
Further clarification and guidelines are provided for in AR-670-1. Can't be arrsed to read through that manual to find the exact verbiage, thus provided the above link and explaination.
 
#8
My personal opinion is that someone screwed up, and accidently ordered the reversed flags. They then decided 'Hmm.. Maybe we need to put them on the right sleeve instead, and come up with this idea?'

In WWII, the right-shoulder flag was not reversed.

Army does not wear a flag on the left, only the unit patch. US flag goes on the right, with the combat patch, which itself causes difficulty on the older uniforms when you have to rip off the US flag, sew on the combat patch, then sew the Flag back on again.

NTM
 
#9
ctauch said:
http://www.ushistory.org/betsy/flagetiq.html
To wear our country's flag properly, the field of stars should be worn closest to your heart. Thus, if your patch is to be worn on your LEFT sleeve, use a left flag. For patches worn on your RIGHT sleeve, use a "right" or "reversed field" flag. Since the law does not specifically address the positioning of the patch, a decision is left to the discretion of the organization prescribing the wear. Some elect to use the "left" flag on both sleeves. [Note: many states and cities have ordinances pertaining to the use of the flag; you may wish to contact the Attorney General of your state or the City Attorney's office regarding this matter.] If you are planning to wear only one patch, it is recommended that you wear a "left" flag on your left sleeve. Military guidelines specify that in support of joint or multi-national operations, the "right" flag is worn on the right sleeve, 1/4" below the shoulder seam or 1/8" below any required unit patches.
Source: Army Website FAQs
Further clarification and guidelines are provided for in AR-670-1. Can't be arrsed to read through that manual to find the exact verbiage, thus provided the above link and explaination.
further to the above I remember hearing that the 'right' flag was worn overseas and on ops, whereas the 'left' flag was for CONUS
 

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