US Forces Korea is lifting its curfew for 90 days to see if troops can behave

#1
US Forces Korea is lifting its curfew for 90 days to see if troops can behave
By:
Kyle Rempfer   23 hours ago
The curfew is often called a “readiness call." (Sgt. Christopher Dennis/Army)

1560885092699.png

The U.S. military has lifted its long-standing curfew for troops on the Korean Peninsula, if the roughly 28,500 U.S. service members can behave.

The curfew is being lifted for 90 days by Army Gen. Robert Abrams, commander of all troops on the peninsula, from June 17 to Sep. 17.

The suspension will serve as an evaluation period to assess whether the curfew can be lifted permanently. It is an opportunity to demonstrate U.S. troops’ ability to maintain good order and discipline at all times and under all conditions, the command said in a statement this weekend.

Part of the reason for testing a lift of the curfew is to increase the quality of life for troops stationed in South Korea.

“South Korea is an assignment of choice with countless regional and cultural opportunities for assigned personnel. The intent of the curfew suspension is to provide [U.S. Forces-Korea] personnel greater access to all Korea has to offer,” Col. Jonathan Doyle, U.S. Forces-Korea provost marshal, said.
“Our professional service members will act in accordance with our standards of conduct and Korean laws at all times," Doyle added.

At the end of the evaluation period, Abrams will determine whether to continue the curfew suspension evaluation period, maintain, or rescind the off-installation curfew, the command said.
Behavior, morale and readiness factors will be assessed at the end of the 90-day period.

Normally, the curfew lasts from 1-5 a.m. and requires troops to remain on base, in their residences or hotel rooms during those hours, according to the General Order Regarding Off-Installation Curfew posted to the command’s website.

The curfew is sometimes referred to as a “readiness call," as its restrictions are often framed as a way to ensure troops are able to conduct their duties on the peninsula each day.

“We are a professional military charged with the defense of the Korean Peninsula; military readiness remains a top priority for the command," Doyle said.

The curfew was first imposed in the early 2000s, but was temporarily relaxed in 2010. After public outcry arose in 2011 over alleged crimes, such as rape, by American forces, the curfew was re-instituted.

Doyle said in the U.S. Forces-Korea statement that while the command intends to allow Americans more opportunity to enjoy their stay on the peninsula, each service member is responsible for serving as an ambassador of the United States.

U.S. troops are required to act in accordance with standards of conduct and Korean law, the command said.
“These actions will serve as a demonstration to the ROK people that we will safeguard the vital relationships while maintaining the ironclad Alliance,” the command statement reads.

About Kyle Rempfer
Kyle Rempfer is a senior reporter for Military Times. He previously served as an Air Force combat controller. Kyle's reporting focuses on U.S. Army leadership, recruiting, operations, training, personnel and funding.

C'mon Guys... Don't blow it for me. ;-)
 
#5
US Forces Korea is lifting its curfew for 90 days to see if troops can behave
By:
Kyle Rempfer   23 hours ago
The curfew is often called a “readiness call." (Sgt. Christopher Dennis/Army)

View attachment 399482
The U.S. military has lifted its long-standing curfew for troops on the Korean Peninsula, if the roughly 28,500 U.S. service members can behave.

The curfew is being lifted for 90 days by Army Gen. Robert Abrams, commander of all troops on the peninsula, from June 17 to Sep. 17.

The suspension will serve as an evaluation period to assess whether the curfew can be lifted permanently. It is an opportunity to demonstrate U.S. troops’ ability to maintain good order and discipline at all times and under all conditions, the command said in a statement this weekend.

Part of the reason for testing a lift of the curfew is to increase the quality of life for troops stationed in South Korea.

“South Korea is an assignment of choice with countless regional and cultural opportunities for assigned personnel. The intent of the curfew suspension is to provide [U.S. Forces-Korea] personnel greater access to all Korea has to offer,” Col. Jonathan Doyle, U.S. Forces-Korea provost marshal, said.
“Our professional service members will act in accordance with our standards of conduct and Korean laws at all times," Doyle added.

At the end of the evaluation period, Abrams will determine whether to continue the curfew suspension evaluation period, maintain, or rescind the off-installation curfew, the command said.
Behavior, morale and readiness factors will be assessed at the end of the 90-day period.

Normally, the curfew lasts from 1-5 a.m. and requires troops to remain on base, in their residences or hotel rooms during those hours, according to the General Order Regarding Off-Installation Curfew posted to the command’s website.

The curfew is sometimes referred to as a “readiness call," as its restrictions are often framed as a way to ensure troops are able to conduct their duties on the peninsula each day.

“We are a professional military charged with the defense of the Korean Peninsula; military readiness remains a top priority for the command," Doyle said.

The curfew was first imposed in the early 2000s, but was temporarily relaxed in 2010. After public outcry arose in 2011 over alleged crimes, such as rape, by American forces, the curfew was re-instituted.

Doyle said in the U.S. Forces-Korea statement that while the command intends to allow Americans more opportunity to enjoy their stay on the peninsula, each service member is responsible for serving as an ambassador of the United States.

U.S. troops are required to act in accordance with standards of conduct and Korean law, the command said.
“These actions will serve as a demonstration to the ROK people that we will safeguard the vital relationships while maintaining the ironclad Alliance,” the command statement reads.

About Kyle Rempfer
Kyle Rempfer is a senior reporter for Military Times. He previously served as an Air Force combat controller. Kyle's reporting focuses on U.S. Army leadership, recruiting, operations, training, personnel and funding.

C'mon Guys... Don't blow it for me. ;-)
I give it 30 days...
 
#13
US Forces Korea is lifting its curfew for 90 days to see if troops can behave
By:
Kyle Rempfer   23 hours ago
The curfew is often called a “readiness call." (Sgt. Christopher Dennis/Army)

View attachment 399482
US Forces Korea is lifting its curfew for 90 days to see if troops can behave
By:
Kyle Rempfer   23 hours ago
The curfew is often called a “readiness call." (Sgt. Christopher Dennis/Army)

View attachment 399482
The U.S. military has lifted its long-standing curfew for troops on the Korean Peninsula, if the roughly 28,500 U.S. service members can behave.

The curfew is being lifted for 90 days by Army Gen. Robert Abrams, commander of all troops on the peninsula, from June 17 to Sep. 17.

The suspension will serve as an evaluation period to assess whether the curfew can be lifted permanently. It is an opportunity to demonstrate U.S. troops’ ability to maintain good order and discipline at all times and under all conditions, the command said in a statement this weekend.

Part of the reason for testing a lift of the curfew is to increase the quality of life for troops stationed in South Korea.

“South Korea is an assignment of choice with countless regional and cultural opportunities for assigned personnel. The intent of the curfew suspension is to provide [U.S. Forces-Korea] personnel greater access to all Korea has to offer,” Col. Jonathan Doyle, U.S. Forces-Korea provost marshal, said.
“Our professional service members will act in accordance with our standards of conduct and Korean laws at all times," Doyle added.

At the end of the evaluation period, Abrams will determine whether to continue the curfew suspension evaluation period, maintain, or rescind the off-installation curfew, the command said.
Behavior, morale and readiness factors will be assessed at the end of the 90-day period.

Normally, the curfew lasts from 1-5 a.m. and requires troops to remain on base, in their residences or hotel rooms during those hours, according to the General Order Regarding Off-Installation Curfew posted to the command’s website.

The curfew is sometimes referred to as a “readiness call," as its restrictions are often framed as a way to ensure troops are able to conduct their duties on the peninsula each day.

“We are a professional military charged with the defense of the Korean Peninsula; military readiness remains a top priority for the command," Doyle said.

The curfew was first imposed in the early 2000s, but was temporarily relaxed in 2010. After public outcry arose in 2011 over alleged crimes, such as rape, by American forces, the curfew was re-instituted.

Doyle said in the U.S. Forces-Korea statement that while the command intends to allow Americans more opportunity to enjoy their stay on the peninsula, each service member is responsible for serving as an ambassador of the United States.

U.S. troops are required to act in accordance with standards of conduct and Korean law, the command said.
“These actions will serve as a demonstration to the ROK people that we will safeguard the vital relationships while maintaining the ironclad Alliance,” the command statement reads.

About Kyle Rempfer
Kyle Rempfer is a senior reporter for Military Times. He previously served as an Air Force combat controller. Kyle's reporting focuses on U.S. Army leadership, recruiting, operations, training, personnel and funding.

C'mon Guys... Don't blow it for me. ;-)
The U.S. military has lifted its long-standing curfew for troops on the Korean Peninsula, if the roughly 28,500 U.S. service members can behave.

The curfew is being lifted for 90 days by Army Gen. Robert Abrams, commander of all troops on the peninsula, from June 17 to Sep. 17.

The suspension will serve as an evaluation period to assess whether the curfew can be lifted permanently. It is an opportunity to demonstrate U.S. troops’ ability to maintain good order and discipline at all times and under all conditions, the command said in a statement this weekend.

Part of the reason for testing a lift of the curfew is to increase the quality of life for troops stationed in South Korea.

“South Korea is an assignment of choice with countless regional and cultural opportunities for assigned personnel. The intent of the curfew suspension is to provide [U.S. Forces-Korea] personnel greater access to all Korea has to offer,” Col. Jonathan Doyle, U.S. Forces-Korea provost marshal, said.
“Our professional service members will act in accordance with our standards of conduct and Korean laws at all times," Doyle added.

At the end of the evaluation period, Abrams will determine whether to continue the curfew suspension evaluation period, maintain, or rescind the off-installation curfew, the command said.
Behavior, morale and readiness factors will be assessed at the end of the 90-day period.

Normally, the curfew lasts from 1-5 a.m. and requires troops to remain on base, in their residences or hotel rooms during those hours, according to the General Order Regarding Off-Installation Curfew posted to the command’s website.

The curfew is sometimes referred to as a “readiness call," as its restrictions are often framed as a way to ensure troops are able to conduct their duties on the peninsula each day.

“We are a professional military charged with the defense of the Korean Peninsula; military readiness remains a top priority for the command," Doyle said.

The curfew was first imposed in the early 2000s, but was temporarily relaxed in 2010. After public outcry arose in 2011 over alleged crimes, such as rape, by American forces, the curfew was re-instituted.

Doyle said in the U.S. Forces-Korea statement that while the command intends to allow Americans more opportunity to enjoy their stay on the peninsula, each service member is responsible for serving as an ambassador of the United States.

U.S. troops are required to act in accordance with standards of conduct and Korean law, the command said.
“These actions will serve as a demonstration to the ROK people that we will safeguard the vital relationships while maintaining the ironclad Alliance,” the command statement reads.

About Kyle Rempfer
Kyle Rempfer is a senior reporter for Military Times. He previously served as an Air Force combat controller. Kyle's reporting focuses on U.S. Army leadership, recruiting, operations, training, personnel and funding.

C'mon Guys... Don't blow it for me. ;-)

They're GI's FFS, and as all squaddies do, when let off the leash, some will go large, some wont, and some will act like cnuts, its human nature, bars will be trashed, females will be abused, children will be fathered, and the local plod will have their work cut out for them when a crowd of drunken septic gobby shouty GI,s decide to show the "Gooks" who's in charge. I've seen it in Sardinia in 1974, ( A massive inter service fight in the dockside boozers of Cagliari) and heard it in Bern in 1980, and had to make apologies to A pub landlord in london in 1975 (Yanks over for the royal tournament).

Nothing changes, only the uniform.
 
Last edited:
#14
US Forces Korea is lifting its curfew for 90 days to see if troops can behave


“South Korea is an assignment of choice with countless regional and cultural opportunities for assigned personnel.
Bullshit it's a hardship tour for 2ID

Also I bet it last a week before someones caught phucking the midget of TokoRi
 
#15
They're GI's FFS, and as all squaddies do, when let off the leash, some will go large, some wont, and some will act like cnuts, its human nature, bars will be trashed, females will be abused, children will be fathered, and the local plod will have their work cut out for them when a crowd of drunken septic gobby shouty GI,s decide to show the "Gooks" who's in charge. I've seen it in Sardinia in 1974, and heard it in Bern in 1980, and had to make apologies to A pub landlord in london in 1975 (Yanks over for the royal tournament).
Oh, and I suppose you Brits are all angels when off duty? :-D Tales have been told of BAOR squaddies in its hey-day, Hamburg, Amsterdam, etc. :cyclopsani::nod::nod::nod::mrgreen: And how about Sluggy who terrorized the local population down in the Falklands during her jolly - drinking beer from a crippled man's peg leg. I'll bet he needed that leg to get home. :1: (Sounds like a jolly jape to me tho' :p
 
#16
Bullshit it's a hardship tour for 2ID

Also I bet it last a week before someones caught phucking the midget of TokoRi
Actually, it was considered a hardship tour when I was in. It was usually only 1 year and unaccompanied. Geographical bachelors can get in an awful lot of trouble in 1 year.
 
#17
Oh, and I suppose you Brits are all angels when off duty? :-D Tales have been told of BAOR squaddies in its hey-day, Hamburg, Amsterdam, etc. :cyclopsani::nod::nod::nod::mrgreen: And how about Sluggy who terrorized the local population down in the Falklands during her jolly - drinking beer from a crippled man's peg leg. I'll bet he needed that leg to get home. :1: (Sounds like a jolly jape to me tho' :p



Read my post again especially the bit that says" As all squaddies do" the term squaddie is British terminology, The Americans like the description GI's....ERGO:- squaddies, the all encompassing description of ALL soldiers everywhere, including, much to your shock and horror BAOR. Of which I was a proud member from 1976-81, and just as guilty as any.
 

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