US army stretched to breaking point

#1
http://edition.cnn.com/2006/US/01/25/army.study.ap/index.html

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Stretched by frequent troop rotations to Iraq and Afghanistan, the Army has become a "thin green line" that could snap unless relief comes soon, according to a study for the Pentagon.
Wow so its not just us Brits..... I do wish one day policticians would listen to military men instead of focusing on bits of paper with numbers on them and think about the realism of the situation.
 
#2
listen to military men?
about the same time they give out decent kit and enough of it!
 
#3
It all come's down to the old rule.

Don't confuse ambition with ability.

As an ex everything I really respect the job that you, the serving Soldier's are doing.

Toe
 
#5
The Army is certainly going to be spending some time recovering from this one. I would not go as far as to say they're at breaking point, but if another war breaks out anywhere, there are going to be some very unhappy soldiers. If they're in Iraq, they're staying in Iraq, no year-long-tours for the duration.

The Guard is going to take a bit more time to fix.

NTM
 
#6
California_Tanker said:
The Army is certainly going to be spending some time recovering from this one. I would not go as far as to say they're at breaking point, but if another war breaks out anywhere, there are going to be some very unhappy soldiers. If they're in Iraq, they're staying in Iraq, no year-long-tours for the duration.

The Guard is going to take a bit more time to fix.

NTM
Do you see the war as becoming more unpopular? I see it here in Louisiana all the time. Even those folks most supportive in the beginning are starting to question it.
 
#7
#8
Rumsfeld said he has not read the study , but took issue with it's conclusions....

:roll:
 
#9
it would appear that people are confusing some things here...there are two components to force numbers/strength; recruitment and retention.

Recruitment may, in some areas, be off target. That is to say there may be fewer NEW soldiers coming into service then expected and some of it is seasonal and some of it is economical (we do have a unemployement rate of less then 5% in the US currently) and some of it is related to the ongoing conflicts and the risks they carry.

Retention rate is high. That is to say current serving soldier are extending and staying in the services.

Since retention is high, recruitment can take it in the shorts (be off it's target slightly) and the forces still remain combat effective.

The US news media is confusing terms and not reporting the facts accurately....again, but what's new.
 
#10
sawdusty said:
Do you see the war as becoming more unpopular? I see it here in Louisiana all the time. Even those folks most supportive in the beginning are starting to question it.
Dude, I live in the San Francisco Bay Area. "More unpopular" is impossible in a county where some 90% of the voters voted for Kerry and weren't too keen on the invasion in the first place.

That said, a large portion of the avid supporters on the web I've found seem to be slightly divorced from reality. But that's just the web. Overall, I think support for the mission is the same, just people are questioning whether it's about time the mission ended. After all, we've had the last round of elections, the Iraqi security forces are getting better.. When's that drawdown happening again? I think things will be much more acceptable when they're down to the 80,000 or less mark for the US. It'll really look like we're advancing. The current going from 150,000 to 120,000 isn't that eyecatching an improvement.

NTM
 
#17
This topic was initated since 9-11. The purpose is to keep units together until they complete their overseas deployment and return. On return soldiers that are leaving the service are allowed to do so. Its a simple concept - unit cohesion.
 
#18
tomahawk6 said:
This topic was initated since 9-11. The purpose is to keep units together until they complete their overseas deployment and return. On return soldiers that are leaving the service are allowed to do so. Its a simple concept - unit cohesion.
Can I assume from this comment, that you are not one of the poor souls who signed up for 6 years and suddenly found himself doing 7+?

Some time ago I read about one such chap, who, as he was approaching his leave date was 'told' that since his unit was going to Iraq 3 months hence, he would 'have to' remain - apparently 3 months is not enough for a squad to make friends and feel cohesive.... He then was sent to Baghdad, where, after 12 months, he was 'told' his unit would be staying for an additional 6 weeks due to the upsurge in violence! So, he offered 6 years, but they took almost 7 and a half!

Most armed forces take a more 'humane' and sensible view of this problem. If John Doe is due out just before or during an operation, prior to pre-deployment training, he is replaced. Joe Doe is thus not expected to see out his final days - especially those AFTER his contract - in a hell hole, and the unit gains cohesion with the new entrants prior to deployment.

Methinks, you have had the wool pulled tightly over your eyes.
 
#19
*yawn*. When you sign the contract, you sign for a total of 8 years' service. Now, you may do 4 in the Regulars and 4 in the IRR, or 4 in the Reserves and 4 in the IRR, or 3 in the Regulars, 2 in the Reserves, and 3 in the IRR--it's pretty much a mix 'n' match. But once you have put your sig on the paper, you are committed to 8 total years of service. This was explained to me quite plainly by my (gasp!) recruiter. Before I ever raised my right hand. I was nearing the end of my IRR time when OIF was getting ready to launch. I received a stop-loss letter from the Marine Corps in Feb 2003. My wife wasn't very happy about it, as she'd married me several years after I'd stopped dressing in ugly clothes and playing with automatic weapons. I just shrugged--I knew the terms of service, and if called, I'd serve. That's the way it works. As it happened, my stop-loss ended in May 2003, and I got my discharge in the mail that month. "Poor souls"????

As we always used to say, "USMC stands for U Signed the Mother****ing Contract"--and nobody put a gun to your head when you did. :roll:
 

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