US Army says: Nicer drill sergeants more effective

#1
I am not sure if this has been done yet, and I apologize if it has been. A quick search suggests no.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/15210867/
WASHINGTON - Hollywood may have to tone down its portrayal of the military’s screaming, in-your-face boot camp drill sergeant.

In today’s Army, shouting is out and a calmer approach to molding young minds is in, says the head of Pentagon personnel.

The Army says it has reduced by nearly 7 percent the number of recruits who wash out in the first six to 12 months of military life.

“Part of it is changing the nature of how it treats people in basic training,” David S. Chu, undersecretary for personnel and readiness, said Tuesday.

That means “less shouting at everyone, in essence, which some of you may remember from an earlier generation as being the modus operandi,” he said.

The changes started about a year ago, as defense officials looked for ways to make drillmasters more effective, said Lt. Col. Mike Jones, head of Army National Guard recruiting.

He said the old way was to “talk loud, talk often, get their attention” — shock treatment to teach discipline and mold the newly recruited civilian into a soldier.

But trainers found today’s generation responded better to instructors who took “a more counseling” type role, Jones said, using strong tactics when needed but keeping them the exception instead of the rule.

No longer training in fear
The approach has had two positive results, he said: It has lowered attrition among those who go through training each year and has eased one of the greatest fears of recruits — their fear over whether they can make it through basic training.

Other changes aimed at improving graduation rates include such things as letting recruits with injuries or minor medical problems remain in the service, heal, and then go back to training. Before, an injury would have meant discharge, training officials said.

Numbers differ from service to service and depend on what the recruit is being trained for. Those training to be Navy SEALS or other special forces may wash out at the rate of 70 percent. Those training to be truck drivers may have an 80 percent graduation rate.

But Chu said that across all services, generally, some two-thirds of recruits finish their enlistment period — typically three or four years.

Some drop out within six months
Of the third who don’t make it, half bomb out in the first six to 12 months, Chu said, adding that the attrition rate is better than most private sector firms.

Keeping a balance in the number flushed out of the service is important. Too many dropouts and you lose people you really want to keep. Too few dropouts, and you are keeping people you should have let go, Chu said.

Both the military and police academies are moving away from harder-edged approaches to training, he said.

“However much it may be satisfying from the shouter’s perspective, it really isn’t the best way to shape young people for the future,” Chu said.

He made the comments as he announced that all active duty services had met their recruiting goals for the budget year ended Sept. 30. The Marine Corps Reserve met its goal and the Air Force Reserve exceeded its goal, but they were exceptions among guard and reserve forces, some of which have seen “heavy use” due to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, Chu said.
Personally, I think this is a cost cutting exercise and it is primarily about getting the army the numbers it needs. IE Quantity over quality.

Personally, I think that the 'shock treatment' makes plenty of sense as it firstly helps condition would-be soldiers to operate under pressure and it helps weed out those who cannot or will not operate well under pressure.

What go you guys think?

:?

PS: Associated press - Please, please, please please don't sue me for copyright infringement.
 
#2
Shouting for shoutings sake doesnt achieve anything. if you start too early in the phase 1 course, by week 6 the recruits get used to it and it becomes less effective. Shock and awe is useful for the first week, since they are on the back foot when they arrive, to keep the recurits easy to manage in what is a very boring admin week. But it is difficult to bollock them for much since you havent actually taught them anything.
That said, it can be entertaining to watch colleagues "unleash the wirlwind" when something particularly bone/bad happens. Recruits never cease to amaze. shouting, tempered with robust banter is what phase one is all about!
awaiting some heated replies from instructors old and new............
 
#3
Whatever works, I guess. Personally, I never saw anything much for the shouting for shouting's sake. Actually, I had to bite myself to stop from laughing during some of the DS's trantrums. (Tantra?) The guys coming out of Basic still seem to be decent enough, and in fairness, there's a much greater emphasis on warfighting in the new (post 2004) Basic than in the old one.

NTM
 
#4
California_Tanker said:
Whatever works, I guess. Personally, I never saw anything much for the shouting for shouting's sake. Actually, I had to bite myself to stop from laughing during some of the DS's trantrums. (Tantra?) The guys coming out of Basic still seem to be decent enough, and in fairness, there's a much greater emphasis on warfighting in the new (post 2004) Basic than in the old one.

NTM
I went in the mid-80's. My platoon's senior Drill dropped us once in basic. He was from the projects, mangled the English language daily but a real professional. He spent hours with us patiently walking us through everything from shining boots to explaining how to succeed when we got to our units. He confided to us at the end of basic that he just wanted to teach soldiering and saw little use in yelling for yelling's sake. Our platoon would've done anything for the man and years later guys in my squad [all the same MOS and went to the same unit on Bragg] still spoke about him with respect.
 
#5
I enjoyed all the yelling at me it made the training more fun when we had to do alot of pushups or some form of punishment. Others quit or broke down cried then quit which was funny as hell.

The thing that screwed me up was the instructors doing everything different and getting jacked up for one thing correcting it then have another instructor jack me up for my correction and make me do it the previous way.

I still have no idea what thoose 2 french instructors were talking about in the gas chamer when they were yelling at me to fix my nose.
 
#6
It's your training, not ours. Do what you want.
 
#7
Nicer drill sergeants are more defective.
 

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