UOTC vs joining a reserve regiment

OC1512

Crow
I know that there have been threads on this before, but my situation is a bit different to others. I'm going into my 3rd of 4 years at uni. Given that UOTC is meant to be a 3/4 year programme, should I still look to join or should I get some experience by joining the reserves as an enlisted rank? Either way I would like to go to Sandhurst after uni. Any help/advice would be much appreciated
 
I know that there have been threads on this before, but my situation is a bit different to others. I'm going into my 3rd of 4 years at uni. Given that UOTC is meant to be a 3/4 year programme, should I still look to join or should I get some experience by joining the reserves as an enlisted rank? Either way I would like to go to Sandhurst after uni. Any help/advice would be much appreciated
contact your UOTC office, speak to them to see if you are eligible. Be wary of jumping into the AR because that wont pipeline you into Sandhurst and regular commission. They are two different avenues that lead to difference places with the vauge potential to cross over at some point but it could take a decade to reach that cross road.
 

OC1512

Crow
contact your UOTC office, speak to them to see if you are eligible. Be wary of jumping into the AR because that wont pipeline you into Sandhurst and regular commission. They are two different avenues that lead to difference places with the vauge potential to cross over at some point but it could take a decade to reach that cross road.
Ok, thank you. If I have left it too late to join mt UOTC would it then be better to pursue other ways of improving my application rather than going into the reserves?
 

HE117

LE
I'm sure the UOTC will point you in the right direction whatever happens.. It will be difficult at the moment for the OTC to be that specific with all the COVID nonsense, but as all the OTCs are already part of the Sandhurst Group they are your best and quickest route in...
 
D

Deleted 164106

Guest
I know that there have been threads on this before, but my situation is a bit different to others. I'm going into my 3rd of 4 years at uni. Given that UOTC is meant to be a 3/4 year programme, should I still look to join or should I get some experience by joining the reserves as an enlisted rank? Either way I would like to go to Sandhurst after uni. Any help/advice would be much appreciated
UOTC is a good laugh, but doesn't really give experience of being an enlisted rank - it's a very different type of thing.

You don't need to do either for RMAS - it might help a bit but not a huge amount.
 
Ok, thank you. If I have left it too late to join mt UOTC would it then be better to pursue other ways of improving my application rather than going into the reserves?
Firstly, I joined the UOTC in my second year so it's not "too late".

Secondly, you shouldn't imagine that joining either the UOTC or AR decisively add to appeal to the Army. It's perfectly possible to "walk in off the street" and succeed.
 

OC1512

Crow
Firstly, I joined the UOTC in my second year so it's not "too late".

Secondly, you shouldn't imagine that joining either the UOTC or AR decisively add to appeal to the Army. It's perfectly possible to "walk in off the street" and succeed.
Whilst I am looking to make my application 'stronger', I have an interest in all things military and I'm looking to get a taste for it. But thank you for the advice, it's all been useful.
 
UOTC will be very handy for getting a taste for it. Even if you only do a year there'll likely be the chance to see what the different arms do and get a much broader feel for things than if you start turning up at the local blanket stackers every Wednesday.
 
If you want to be a Regular, don't bother with the AR - it takes too long to get in and get trained, and it won't really offer you anything useful. Also, the DS at RMAS would rather have a blank slate to work with, than have to undo all of the chippy habits you'd pick up from the AR.

If you join the UOTC, it is fun and gives you a taste for Army life. Again, it won't make you perform any better at RMAS. If you join the UOTC, do it for you, not the Regular Army, although it may help you get through AOSB.

As others have said, you don't need to do either to become a Regular Officer. The most important thing is getting through AOSB and then turning up at RMAS with two open ears, an open mind and a closed mouth until you are invited to use it.
 
Agree with the above posts. To add, if you don't go UOTC, I would have a good (and interesting) answer to the question 'why didn't you join the UOTC?', as the question will arise at some point in the process. Don't be freaked out, it's not a requirement that you have missed out on, but many regular commission aspirants do join the UOTC, so people will be interested in why you didn't. That's a good opportunity to show independence of thought, being a bit different and having a more rounded background. At this stage in the game, rather than go UOTC or ARes, I'd focus on using the time you have remaining at university to make sure that you have some good life experiences under your belt.
 

Intheshed

Swinger
My daughter went down the UOTC route, has thoroughly enjoyed herself, and has without doubt learned a shed load more RMAS-related 'stuff' than she would have done as a Reserve. She is in this September's RMAS intake and can't wait. Entrance into the Reserves takes forever (allow 12 months) and none of us (declaration of interest here) are actually training at the moment (unless you count the Lone Soldier phys). Of course, UOTC are in the same locked-down boat, but hopefully will open for business shortly. As the others have said, contact your UOTC for details, and good luck!
 
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The DS at RMAS would rather have a blank slate to work with, than have to undo all of the chippy habits you'd pick up from the AR.

<The OTC> won't make you perform any better at RMAS... The most important thing is getting through AOSB and then turning up at RMAS with two open ears, an open mind and a closed mouth until you are invited to use it.
Slightly negative, no? My platoon included guys with a variety of experience - formerly Rowallan Company, ex-cadets, ex-OTC, ex TA and regular soldiers. None embarrassed themselves by acting billy-big-bollocks or regaling shit dits. The DS had no dramas so long as experience was shared rather than hoarded.

Having been to OTC meant that I knew roughly what was coming, wasn't picked for many command appointments, cruised PRACTAC, and sailed through the first term barely breaking a sweat. Cheers, easy!
 
Having been to OTC meant that I knew roughly what was coming, wasn't picked for many command appointments, cruised PRACTAC, and sailed through the first term barely breaking a sweat. Cheers, easy!
Whereas I didn't. Your milage will vary.
 

Bluenose2

Old-Salt
UOTC is a low-commitment way of helping you decide whether the military life is right for you, and whether you're right for it (especially the officer bit).

I'd say 80% of those in my intake pretty much gave up on their dreams of going to RMAS by the end of year 1. That in itself is a very useful process for both parties.

That said, I really enjoyed it.
 

Bobby_Bert

Old-Salt
UOTC will give an insight into service life while being compatible with academic studies. I didn’t bother with OTC and didn’t have any issues at RMAS. Horses for courses.

Pros: A good OTC will gives an insight into service life, opportunity to attend career fair at RMAS, basic field-craft, earn pocket money & gives a good grounding without impinging on the quality of your degree - if you maintain the right balance.

Cons: OTC’s are known to 'cherry pick' the more enjoyable aspects of Army life. This can blur the lines between being a student society and being a military establishment.

The Army Reserve is an operational combat organisation with many units designed to flexibly augment the trained strength of a fighting unit. Joining can be time intensive and it is not designed to provide 'work experience' ahead of joining the regs.

Best of luck.
 
I'm a PhD student and currently in a Reserve Unit,, the main issue regarding reserve units are that they are designed for people who have a job but can take time off for work any time they want. A student obviously has more holidays but there are obviously certain times in the year when they cannot take time off (term time and exam periods). Depending on what part of the army reserve you join you may well end up finding yourself not being able to do a trade course because it runs only once a year and clashes with your study commitments, thus reducing your utility within a unit.
 
I'm a PhD student and currently in a Reserve Unit,, the main issue regarding reserve units are that they are designed for people who have a job but can take time off for work any time they want. A student obviously has more holidays but there are obviously certain times in the year when they cannot take time off (term time and exam periods). Depending on what part of the army reserve you join you may well end up finding yourself not being able to do a trade course because it runs only once a year and clashes with your study commitments, thus reducing your utility within a unit.
I would suggest that people cannot take time off whenever they want in most civilian roles....

If the perception of the leadership at your reserve unit is that this is the case that requires adjustment.
 

Bobby_Bert

Old-Salt
Not long before lockdown Officer Cadets from Oxford and Cambridge University Officers' Training Corps competed in Ex Blue Oxbridge at Sandhurst.⁠
The Officer Cadets competed against each other and Cadets from the academy in a range of sports, took part in a debate and finished the weekend by taking on the obstacle course.⁠ Needless to say this all concluded with a mighty session (see my earlier post reference cherry picking)⁠

Another pro is OTC students have the opportunity to complete the first two modules of the Commissioning Course.
 
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Not long before lockdown Officer Cadets from Oxford and Cambridge University Officers' Training Corps competed in Ex Blue Oxbridge at Sandhurst.⁠
The Officer Cadets competed against each other and Cadets from the academy in a range of sports, took part in a debate and finished the weekend by taking on the obstacle course.⁠ Needless to say this all concluded with a mighty session (see above post for cherry picking point)⁠

Another pro is OTC students have the opportunity to complete the first two modules of the Commissioning Course.
Commission course (short). They still have to do the full regular course.
 

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