Unknown medal

Rod924

LE
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TA medal of long service.
 
Now, I'm not a medals guru but the answers above are almost right, but not quite.

It's an Efficiency Medal but for service in a militia, not the TA. The scroll reads MILITIA, not TERRITORIAL. In later years, under Liz's matronage, T&AVR was a further script.
 
Now, I'm not a medals guru but the answers above are almost right, but not quite.

It's an Efficiency Medal but for service in a militia, not the TA. The scroll reads MILITIA, not TERRITORIAL. In later years, under Liz's matronage, T&AVR was a further script.
. . . and, to be really anoraky, as it has the 'MILITIA' suspender, that makes a GVI 1st issue.

With the MM, that would make it a wholly desirable collectors group, with a named medal at the front and at the rear.

@two_of_seven - any idea where he won the MM? I ask only because it could be either during the Burma campaign or an early France or Norway award, given the absence of any other Theatre stars.
 

smeg-head

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. . . and, to be really anoraky, as it has the 'MILITIA' suspender, that makes a GVI 1st issue.

With the MM, that would make it a wholly desirable collectors group, with a named medal at the front and at the rear.

@two_of_seven - any idea where he Was AWARDED the MM? I ask only because it could be either during the Burma campaign or an early France or Norway award, given the absence of any other Theatre stars.
Bravery medals are not won, they're awarded!
 
Bravery medals are not won, they're awarded!
I disagree,
Referring to a gallantry medal as being won is a time-honoured expression for at least 150 years without being successfully challenged by people who are unaware of the wider definition of 'to win'
Of course it can mean to win a bet for example but the secondary use of it as, for example in the Cambridge Dictionary is;

To receive something positive, such as approval, loyalty, or love because you have earned it:
Her plans have won the support of many local people.
This is Jamie, the four-year old who won the hearts of the nation (= made everyone love him and/or feel sympathy for him).
She would do anything to win his love.
Winning back his trust was the hardest part.


(my bold)

I don't think the above definition devalues the award of a gallantry medal in any way..
 
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Auld-Yin

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smeg-head

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I disagree,
Referring to a gallantry medal as being won is a time-honoured expression for at least 150 years without being successfully challenged by people who are unaware of the wider definition of 'to win'
Of course it can mean to win a bet for example but the secondary use of it as, for example in the Cambridge Dictionary is;

To receive something positive, such as approval, loyalty, or love because you have earned it:
Her plans have won the support of many local people.
This is Jamie, the four-year old who won the hearts of the nation (= made everyone love him and/or feel sympathy for him).
She would do anything to win his love.
Winning back his trust was the hardest part.


(my bold)

I don't think the above definition devalues the award of a gallantry medal in any way..
My opinion is that sports medals are won, bravery medals are awarded to those who have earned them.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Now, I'm not a medals guru but the answers above are almost right, but not quite.

It's an Efficiency Medal but for service in a militia, not the TA. The scroll reads MILITIA, not TERRITORIAL. In later years, under Liz's matronage, T&AVR was a further script.
Medal guru, is it you ?
 

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