Unit abbreviation "HGB" on WW1 memorial

#1
Casting my myopic eyes over a local memorial today (East-central Scotland) I noticed the above unit abbreviation and after a brief google I'm still none the wiser. Managed to decypher all the others and I thought it might be Horse Guards Brigade or some such, but doubt it. An old post on another forum mentioned seeing HCB on a memorial (informed by others this was Highland Cyclists Bn/Bde) so I'm now thinking Highland something. Any knowledgeable people out there able to enlighten me?

Rearguards
 

Fang_Farrier

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#2
#3
Try this,

The Cyclist Battalions TF in 1914-1918


Highland Cyclist Battalion
1/1st Battalion: August 1914 : in Kirkcaldy. Remained in Scotland until moving to Ireland in May 1918, where it then remained.
2/1st Battalion: Formed in Kirkcaldy in November 1914 as a second line battalion. Remained in Scotland until moving to Ireland in May 1918, where it then remained. In July 1915, it formed the 1st Provisional Cyclist Company..
3/1st Battalion: Formed in Kirkcaldy in 1915 as a dept/training unit. Remained in UK until disbanded in March 1916; the troops were posted to the 1/1st and 2/1st Bns and some to the Machine Gun Corps.
 
#5
Thank you gentlemen, it's definitely HGB rather than C for cyclists. And he's listed as a private rather than a gunner (elsewhere on the memorial there's a Gnr from RFA) so would HG (Heavy Guns?) Bde still apply?
 
#7
Yes, Aloysius, that's the memorial, I suppose he must have transferred or been attached in some role and remained as as a private rather than becoming a Gunner; if HGB is the Artillery. Would possibly account for his unit being HGB rather than RFA too. I'm going to have to start looking for HGB on other memorials now. Thank you.
 
#11
Yes, the Scottish National War Memorial site puts a Pte David Pryde who died on the same date stated on the CWGC site in the Highland Cycle Battalion. So it seems it's down to a typo.
 
#12
Yes, the Scottish National War Memorial site puts a Pte David Pryde who died on the same date stated on the CWGC site in the Highland Cycle Battalion. So it seems it's down to a typo.
It's the same person

Surname PRYDE
Firstname David
Service Number 350159
Date Death 29/10/1917
Decoration
Place of birth Kirkcaldy
Other 4/5th Bn. formerly 1174, H.C. Bn.
SNWM roll THE BLACK WATCH (ROYAL HIGHLANDERS)
Rank Pte
Theatre of death F.& F.
 
#14
I think it was Highland Cyclist Battalion. I know of another war memorial (stone cenotaph) with three spelling mistakes on it.

There's nothing to reflect this on his medal index card but SDGW has this:

Name: David Pryde
Birth Place: Kirkcaldy, Fifeshire
Death Date: 29 Oct 1917
Death Location: France & Flanders
Enlistment Location: Kirkcaldy
Rank: Private
Regiment: Black Watch (Royal Highlanders)
Battalion: 4/5th (Angus and Dundee) Battalion (Territorial)
Number: 350159
Type of Casualty: Killed in action
Theatre of War: Western European Theatre
Comments: Formerly 1174, H.C. Battn

Damn. beat me to it. ;)
 
#16
A bit more..

David Pryce has no known grave and is commeorated on the Tyne Cot memorial.

The 4/5th Black Watch were part of 118 bde of 39 Division in October 1917. They formed part of X Corps of 2nd Army.

On 29th October the 39th Division relieved the 7th Division, which had itself releived the 39th on 24th October after this formation had held their portion of the line for 4 days. It was a cold day 41 degrees Farenheit, cloudy but it didn't rain. It says a lot about the conditions that a Division would be releived after holding this section of front for only a few days.

As far as I can work out, the 39th Dividion and 7th Division were taking turns in hoilding a partticularly hellish part of the front line, just west of the area known as "Tower Hamlets" on the Gheluveltd Ridge. If you visit the areea now the easiest reference points are possibly the two obilisks as the menin road cerests the ridge. There is a road junction signposted to PPCLI Memorial North of the Road. I think the 39th Division were occupying about a mile of front line SSW of there. As far as I can make out from photos of this area, there were no trenches, merely shell holes and German built bunkers.
 
#18
Yes, Aloysius, that's the memorial, I suppose he must have transferred or been attached in some role and remained as as a private rather than becoming a Gunner; if HGB is the Artillery. Would possibly account for his unit being HGB rather than RFA too. I'm going to have to start looking for HGB on other memorials now. Thank you.
David Pryde is my Great great uncle. I was wondering if you found anything out about david?? I haven't had much luck although I do know that he enlisted when he was 16 after his father agreed to let him go. Although he never returned. I also know he was awarded a medal that wasn't one every soldier automatically received although I have no idea what it was for or where the medal is now...
 
#20
His medal card gives no indication of anything unusual:
I believe he was awarded it after he died?? That's what someone at the Tyne Cot memorial told my grandad, but we have no idea what the medal was or what it was awarded for. I guess we'll never know. Thank you for sending me this, how did you find his medal card??
 

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