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underrated films.

arfah

LE
I’ll chime in with:

“Uncle Buck.”
John Candy.
Is Buck responsible enough to babysit his brother’s children?

And “Summer rental” also John Candy.
Family vacation beset by mishaps - underdog movie.
 
Tiananmen Square, without the happy ending...
Didn't end well for the chap I assume? :? I remember a similar scene from "The Beast" about a Soviet tank crew in Afghanistan in the 1980s. The tank commander used a villager to provide some traction under one of his tracks to get unstuck. Harsh, but fair. And messy.

The Beast.JPG
 

Stabwedge

Old-Salt
I’ll chime in with:

“Uncle Buck.”
John Candy.
Is Buck responsible enough to babysit his brother’s children?

And “Summer rental” also John Candy.
Family vacation beset by mishaps - underdog movie.
Another underrated John Candy movie is The Great Outdoors.
John Candy takes his family on a nostalgic holiday to a cabin, only to be outshone by his irritating Brother in Law (Dan Ackroyd) who he doesn't know will be there. Very, very good.
 

legobrick

Old-Salt
For me it would have to be Water, with Micheal Caine, Billy Connolly, Leonard Rossiter and Fulton Mackay. Well worth a watch if you can find it online.
 
For me it would have to be Water, with Micheal Caine, Billy Connolly, Leonard Rossiter and Fulton Mackay. Well worth a watch if you can find it online.

I like the scene with the mercenaries on the beach.
 
For me it would have to be Water, with Micheal Caine, Billy Connolly, Leonard Rossiter and Fulton Mackay. Well worth a watch if you can find it online.
The leader of the mercenaries in Water was played by Paul Heiney who was a presenter on That's Life. He was making a series called In At The Deep End, which saw him and the other bloke, Chris Searle, doing various jobs. The only other one I remember is Searle becoming a professional snooker player, and Steve 'Interesting' Davis telling him that he would never be a pro.
 
84C MOPIC - a very low budget Vietnam War film about LRRPS. Normally low budget means cheap and nasty but this is well done and atmospheric. Technically it's a 'found footage' film - done way before Blair Witch was even thought of

In the same vein,BAT 21, with Gene hackman and Danny Glover.
 
The leader of the mercenaries in Water was played by Paul Heiney who was a presenter on That's Life. He was making a series called In At The Deep End, which saw him and the other bloke, Chris Searle, doing various jobs. The only other one I remember is Searle becoming a professional snooker player, and Steve 'Interesting' Davis telling him that he would never be a pro.

I remember Heiney going to Ollie Reed for tips on being a nasty bastard and getting slung out on his ear after about ten minutes.

ETA:

 

Yokel

LE
The other night I caught the laser twenty or so minutes of Manhunter. This was overshadowed by The Silence Of The Lambs and later Red Dragon. It focuses not so much on the serial killer as the FBI profiler trying to work out who is murdering all these women and their families.
 
An old Ealing production
the bells go down 1943 with Tommy Trinder,James Mason,william hartnell and many other greats from the period
made as a homage to the volunteers of the AFS

My father used to work at Imperial College, one of the old boys there had joined the AFS as a youngster, the film came up in conversation, he said that was how it was, we was all mates, we did our best
we lost good mates
but we never thought of giving in

My Late Uncle , Bomber Command, said to me, those men were the ones who deserved all the praise, we had guns and bombs to fight back with, he recalls going through the city, and seeing fire hoses trailing everywhere, a burnt out fire appliance, and a young nurse trying to get a fireman to drink cold tea while her friend rubbed cream on his badly burnt face, 2 days they had been there and never gave up


Cracking film.
One of the scenes with James Mason is set in a pub where the AFS are accused of being war dodgers, just before the full horrors of the London blitz, ironically Mason was a registered conscientious objector. A choice which caused a schism with several of his family.

My own offering for this thread is the film Sorcerer.

The film was beset with problems, including an unsuccessful demolitions expert, location problems, weather, cast, to name but a few.
It ran over budget and pretty much sunk at the box office. Director William Friedkin thought that its release was unluckily timed, just at the same time as Star Wars. It’s now seen as something of a cult classic.
I first saw this film when I was 11 and can still remember being perturbed by one of the scenes which has a truckload of burnt bodies in it.

Sorcerer (film) - Wikipedia
 
I posted this on the internet thread but it works just as well here.

"The Plank" was originally a short black and white film starring Eric Sykes and Tommy Cooper, but was remade in 1979 in colour starring Eric Sykes and Arthur Lowe as the main characters, and a host of well know faces of the time in minor parts. On the whole the film is silent, yes there are sounds and voices of minor characters, but the main two don't say a word.

What makes it great therefore are the facial expressions and body gestures, matched with in many cases pure slapstick comedy that you can see coming a mile off. Nowadays comedy needs a swear word in every sentence, so where did we go wrong?

 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
I posted this on the internet thread but it works just as well here.

"The Plank" was originally a short black and white film starring Eric Sykes and Tommy Cooper, but was remade in 1979 in colour starring Eric Sykes and Arthur Lowe as the main characters, and a host of well know faces of the time in minor parts. On the whole the film is silent, yes there are sounds and voices of minor characters, but the main two don't say a word.

What makes it great therefore are the facial expressions and body gestures, matched with in many cases pure slapstick comedy that you can see coming a mile off. Nowadays comedy needs a swear word in every sentence, so where did we go wrong?

I prefer the black and white version, but had never seen this one
an all time favourite, including the Morris 8 series E that gradually gets destroyed
I recognised quite a few street scenes in it
in fact it hs nearly everybody in the comedy and acting world taking part, some nice little cameo roles
in this one I spotted Wilfred Hyde White, whose father was a local rector in Bourton on the water, he is buried there I think
 

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