Army Rumour Service

Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

underrated films.

Naked, starring David Thewlis.

Its a Mike Leigh film so not to everyone's taste but the acting from Thewlus is superb.
 

Tyk

LE
Many thanks to yourself and @Joker62 although I still feel like a bit of a tit for not doing that meself.
I may have, I believe, a DVD or VHS of it somewhere.
Has anybody else seen it? (the movie, not my copy of it).


Sent from my karzi while losing several pounds

Seen it quite a few times, it's an excellent film.
 
Secrets and Lies.


I’m not sure i’d Call it underrated since it was well received critically, but it’s not a Hollywood style film nor the the typical UK film designed to appeal to a wide audience. It is another Mike Leigh film after all. But well crafted and with great endearing performances. Especially the scene when Brenda Blethyn’s character realises Hortense is her daughter.
 
This thread just jarred a memory loose for me. I also want to nominate "Ladyhawke" from the '80s starring Matthew Broderick, Rutger Hauer, and Michelle Pfeiffer. It's one of those films that are easily forgotten, but I do remember seeing it at the theatre and really enjoying it.
 

Tyk

LE
Dredd - Apparently it didn't do well at the box office, but the story is solid (if fairly simple which is no bad thing), the acting is top notch, it's very gritty and rather brutal, the script is good, the characters are well developed and to top it off not a woke bone in sight.

 
Thank you - I will take the time to watch that tonmorow. I last saw it in 1990.

Another US film that I cannot remember was about a group of demobilised soldiers adjusting to life after World War Two. Brad Johnson and Tom Sizemore were in it.
.
An American story, a drama of the real life battle of Athens georgia in august 1946 where WW2 veterans rose up and fought a corrupt local government by taking up arms against it
 
Does anybody know of one of my favourite movies, well up in my top ten "The Last Valley" starring Michael Caine?
Whenever I have mentioned this to anybody over the last forty or so years (even to film buffs who like this sort of thing) have never heard of it and tell me that I am talking bolox but knowing me, I probably am.
Set during the Hundred Years War in plague-ravaged Europe, merceneries find a valley village that has been unaffected and they decide to over-Winter there.
Cracking movie. Errmm, I am sure that it does exist? Bedtime rum beckons.

Edited for Old Rosie, rum and for being a d*ck.


Sent from my karzi while losing several pounds
You're not going crazy. I was gifted a DVD copy of this 1971 movie a couple of Christmases ago. It was kind of depressing with all the killing, raping, and looting going on. There was some subplot of a religious shrine of some kind too to Jesus Christ or Loki or Odin that Michael Caine was arguing with the village priest about. I didn't get that bit on first view, but maybe it's worth another screening.
 

Chimp

ADC
1601163780314.jpeg

Odd but compelling. Ed Harris at his best. I have seen it once on TV over 25 years ago, after a few wets... but it sticks. I need to seen it again.
 
Eurotrip
Silly youth comedy about a US kid and his mates crossing Europe to get to his German pen pal. Very, very funny.

Love Eurotrip. A Man Utd fan club based in London was way too close to truth and the end credit clips are brilliant. I didn’t even click that Matt Damon was in it until pointed out by a lass - Vinnie Jones, Lucy Lawless and Joanna Lumley in supporting roles too. Very underrated.

ETA: Sex drive - a similar sort of movie, but a road trip across america for a teen to get laid rather than across europe. Some great lines, kinda moving and very funny. Loved the Amish.
 
Last edited:
Some good choices and a few I've not seen or heard yet to check out.

A film I've always liked that seems to get panned is "Eyes Wide Shut"

I love Kubtick films, and although I don't think it's his best work, its pace is so slow and relaxed you can watch it again and see something you missed before.

It's also good to see Tom Cruise in a role where he isn't a wisecracking, dealer of death and is instead the somewhat emasculated underdog.
 
The Brand New Testament.
I watched it after someone else recommended it on here - hilarious, moving and utterly blasphemous. God as an obnoxious, drunken, abusive Belgian is perfect.

Jaques Tati films - all of them. I first watched them as a young teenager and was transfixed by their gentle comedy. They are utterly perfect and despite being slow, inoffensive and nearly wordless they still hold me breathless with their planned perfection.

Slingblade. A story of a vulnerable and marginalised person faced by a society he doesn’t understand and trying to cope. Not brilliant but thought provoking.

Easy A. Emma Stone is brilliant in a coming of age comedy - the supporting actors are great and some really fun lines from them. It is both PC (a good side story of gay love) and pokes fun at it with a outrageously racist joke.

Hard Candy - any movie that makes you feel almost sorry for a paedo (a comment from a an ex of mine) has to be good.

Evolution - I will never tire of this movie. Brilliant in every aspect, if a typically cheesy american ending.

Rogue One - it is what the franchise should have been. All the original fans were grown up and should have been able to face a darker story line. Even (spoiler alert) the death of Han didn‘t really cut it in terms of where the story should have gone. This film really tied a lot together and as the original was formative for me I loved it.
 

Tyk

LE
You're not going crazy. I was gifted a DVD copy of this 1971 movie a couple of Christmases ago. It was kind of depressing with all the killing, raping, and looting going on. There was some subplot of a religious shrine of some kind too to Jesus Christ or Loki or Odin that Michael Caine was arguing with the village priest about. I didn't get that bit on first view, but maybe it's worth another screening.

An essential part of the backstory that I guess is easy to miss is that a lot of the war was about religion. The Catholics and the Protestants were literally at each others throats, it was fundamentally a sectarian war over the Holy Roman Empire in the Germanic states and the fact they viewed the Lutheran Protestants as vile heretics, the protestants were equally violently opposed to the "idolatry" of the Catholics, plus it was a power grab.
The shrine you remember is in fact one of the numerous (at the time) shrines to some Saint or other that the Catholics worshipped hence the idolatry was real, at least to the Protestants.
That war is a classic case of the various rulers using the politics of religion as an excuse to just kick the crap out of people they didn't like and grab their land/wealth/food/remains of population that hadn't been slaughtered.

It helps if you have an appreciation of the history of the time and the place, then you can appreciate the motivations (such as they were) behind all the violence. If you watch it again you'll notice that the village is Catholic and Michael Caine's mercenary warband has both Catholics and Protestants who divide on sectarian lines. It looks quite a simple film, but it's got some nuance that would make little sense without the history.
 
An essential part of the backstory that I guess is easy to miss is that a lot of the war was about religion. The Catholics and the Protestants were literally at each others throats, it was fundamentally a sectarian war over the Holy Roman Empire in the Germanic states and the fact they viewed the Lutheran Protestants as vile heretics, the protestants were equally violently opposed to the "idolatry" of the Catholics, plus it was a power grab.
The shrine you remember is in fact one of the numerous (at the time) shrines to some Saint or other that the Catholics worshipped hence the idolatry was real, at least to the Protestants.
That war is a classic case of the various rulers using the politics of religion as an excuse to just kick the crap out of people they didn't like and grab their land/wealth/food/remains of population that hadn't been slaughtered.

It helps if you have an appreciation of the history of the time and the place, then you can appreciate the motivations (such as they were) behind all the violence. If you watch it again you'll notice that the village is Catholic and Michael Caine's mercenary warband has both Catholics and Protestants who divide on sectarian lines. It looks quite a simple film, but it's got some nuance that would make little sense without the history.
Thanks for that. It sounds as if it would be worthwhile to put it on the 42 in flat screen some day soon to see if I can get a better understanding of what's actually going on in it.
 
In no particular order:

Ships With Wings
That Hamilton Woman
Lifeline To Victory
The Bridges Of Toki-Ro
Spies Like Us
Whoops Apocalypse
Flight Of The Intruder
Duel
Armed And Dangerous
The Fourth Protocol


There are others that I cannot remember the names of. There was an American film about three astronauts trapped in a space station.
Silent Running?
 
A couple which may have passed you by:

Water (1985), so overlooked even IMDB doesn't list the title unless you search for the actors! An all-star British comedy classic from Clement and La Frenais sees Michael Caine as the governer of a small British island in the Caribbean. Add in Billy Connolly, Leonard Rossiter, Fulton Mackay, and host of "isn't that...?" faces it is a joy to behold with some fantastic dialogue.

Idiocracy (2006), rapidly becoming a bit to close to the truth for my liking. The hero is an average US soldier who is frozen in time and wakes up 500 years in the future in a society where he find himself the smartest man alive. So many subtle digs at big business and the American way of life

The Last Starfighter (1984). The story of a teen from a trailer park who ends up saving the galaxy. Very early use of CGI gives it a great visual appeal, it was one of those films that practically followed the book of the same name to the letter but it is a nice story and very well portrayed.
 
The Omega Man, with Charlton Heston as, what he believes to be the sole post viral die off of humans fighting off mutated humans. He does eventually team up with other human survivors.


The film is a remake of The Last Man on Earth, and was again remade with Will Smith as I am Legend.

I could be wrong in calling it underrated since I haven’t seen it since it first came out so it could deserve its lowish but not bombed score on Rotten Tomatoes and Iimdb, but I enjoyed it at the time.
 

New Posts

Latest Threads

Top