UK turboprop lands sideways in strong wind, 2015

That's nothing new for Leeds-Bradford. I'll never forget one of my flights with Eastern Airways when the pilot attempted to 'feel' his way to the runway through thick fog three (!) times before deciding that perhaps trying a field where a white stick wasn't necessary might be a sensible idea.
 
we would regularly land like that with Logan Air on Unst - Shetlands.
Every trip was .... memorable to say the least. If they could get one wheel down then they were set.
 
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LBA is a shithole, crosswinds are obligatory as the runway only fits one way on top of the hill and that is most inconvenient as that way has cock all to do with the prevailing wind. The runway also slopes which is fun because the slope on one end is the same as the autoland profile so the thing just flies parallel with the runway until it gives up and a controlled crash ensues.

It is the only place I've ever used the full 40 knot crosswind capability on the aircraft and 8 of my lives.

It is also near Bradford which makes for a pleasant nightstop. Not.

Very regrettably it is now a Category B (Restricted) airport for us and because I'm not a God I can't go there unless accompanied by a God. Gutted.

Snigger.
 
Buys Ballot's second law

"No matter where the low pressure is in the Northern Hemisphere,
you will always have a cross-wind in Sumburgh"
 

2/51

LE
Once landed in Aberdeen from Teeside in a small 12 seater turbo prop. The approach was a series of lurches and lunges ever earth wards. As we "hit" the runway all sorts of warning lights and buzzers went off in the cockpit. The pilot wrestled the plane to a stop, turned to us, wiped his brow and said, "I thought we were goners there!".

It truly was the worst flight ever!!
 

FHA

LE
LBA is a shithole, crosswinds are obligatory as the runway only fits one way on top of the hill and that is most inconvenient as that way has cock all to do with the prevailing wind. The runway also slopes which is fun because the slope on one end is the same as the autoland profile so the thing just flies parallel with the runway until it gives up and a controlled crash ensues.

It is the only place I've ever used the full 40 knot crosswind capability on the aircraft and 8 of my lives.

It is also near Bradford which makes for a pleasant nightstop. Not.

Very regrettably it is now a Category B (Restricted) airport for us and because I'm not a God I can't go there unless accompanied by a God. Gutted.

Snigger.
It was at LBA that I watched a 737-400 get spun by the wind. Next stand to the aircraft I was working on. Thought the tail was going to hit the wingtip. Me and my mate the only ones around to witness it in the middle of the night.
Caught the radome on the pier, pax steps tried to carve open the wing and then comes to a stop as the wing LE embeds in an upright of the terminal. All in a split second and me thinking "did I really just see that?!" Aforementioned mate then splits his napper on the d-door running to put the chocks back in. Found him lying, pissing blood everywhere surrounded by bits of radar. Surreal.
Yep, that's how I remember LBA, quite windy.
 

Niamac

GCM
Landing (or taking off) from Leeds Bradford in a Shorts 360 (aka the Flying Furniture Van) was not for the faint hearted. After one very hard landing the Man came over the i/c "Sorry ladies and gentlemen but there are some times that one has to be positive". Quite.
 

DaManBugs

LE
Book Reviewer
Again from BHX, from last year...that looks like a bloody windy airport!

Wow! And wow again! It's when you see stuff like that you realise just how astonishingly skillful pilots are. It's not just a matter of going up, flying straight and setting down. Thanks for posting it.

I just wonder if there's some some sort of automatic take-off/landing system that could actually do what they do.

MsG
 
AFAIAA all take offs are manually flown.

Autoland has been around for years, IIRC the first was in the Trident back in the early 60s. Modern auto lands can get you down in 75m visibility, in certain circumstances eg the 787 it can be less, with the cloud base at 0'.

This requires both the aircraft and runway to be fitted with the appropriate kit and certain extra procedures in force for example to prevent the radio beam the aircraft flies down being distorted by the aircraft ahead. Crews are also additionally trained but this isn't exceptionally onerous.

The big issue in the context of this thread is that the maximum crosswind component (XWC) for an Autoland is almost always considerably less than for a manually flown landing. As an example, types I'm familiar with have a 15 knot max XWC for Autoland, 40 knots XWC for manual.

Given that this is Aviation forum and no offence to those who know but for those whose skills are in other areas, a knot is around 1.15 mph and the XWC is not strictly wind speed, it's the bit of the wind that is across rather than head on / tail on.

And yes, most commercial flying is pretty routine, you get paid for making good decisions and for what you can do when it all goes boobs north and /or Mother Nature gets a sad on.
 
BHX is another airport that can be fun because of the way the wind blows around the local environment. To be blunt, this is true of virtually every airport, especially when the wind is gusting or varying in direction. A strong, steady wind is preferable to a light, gusting / variable wind as it is predictable. Landing speeds are partly calculated using wind speeds and considers only half the steady speed but all the gust.
 
Ouch!

Not sure that's Windshear as such. Shear is a sudden change in direction and or speed which is usually manifested by the airspeed of the aircraft changing rapidly which in turn results in the need to alter the pitch (nose up / down).

All Boeing types I'm familiar with (doesn't include B747-400 shown) have Predictive Windshear which IMHO would have detected shear to that extent in the take off roll, set off the relevant alarm and the crew would have aborted the take off. It is viewed so seriously that it is one of only 4 things we'd abort a take off for above 80knots (about 10 seconds into the take off roll). The other 3 are a fire, an engine failure (at least on a two engine aircraft, never flown a 3 or 4 eng job so don't know) or something that will make the aircraft unflyable. Everything else we'd take into the air and sort it out then because that's the safest option.

That looks more like some kind of rotor action resulting in the roll (wing down / up). Pretty scary to get it to that degree though! Rotor action results from winds blowing round things, usually mountains but it is also well known to occur from buildings on a smaller scale. That stuff at BHX is almost certainly from the local geography, experienced it a few times.

Pure Speculation Alert: looks like there is some pretty big convective cloud around in the background so that could certainly do it. Also, Pilot Induced Oscillation; it takes time to stop several hundred tons of something doing one thing and make it do another. Pilot reactions and the control inputs are faster and sometimes you get out of synch with the whole thing and actually make matters worse.
 

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer

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