UK Transport Crisis?

The discussion of speed limits and difficult single carriageway roads prompts me to enquire of you drivers as to what the handling of HGV’s is like?
Are they good at sticking to the road overall and only lose it if pushed to hard or are you living on a knife edge all the time, I appreciate that the load will have some influence in terms of COG and momentum etc again bit like my question on recycling damaged loads the answer will be it depends……..
 
The discussion of speed limits and difficult single carriageway roads prompts me to enquire of you drivers as to what the handling of HGV’s is like?
Are they good at sticking to the road overall and only lose it if pushed to hard or are you living on a knife edge all the time, I appreciate that the load will have some influence in terms of COG and momentum etc again bit like my question on recycling damaged loads the answer will be it depends……..

I drove artic tankers for a while, carrying foodstuffs, which meant there weren't the same number of baffles in the 'tube' (as say fuel loads) to limit the movement of the liquid in transit.

A very weird sensation to have tonnes of load moving when you're stationary, then catching up with you after moving off and giving you a 'surge' in momentum.
 

kieren21

Clanker
The discussion of speed limits and difficult single carriageway roads prompts me to enquire of you drivers as to what the handling of HGV’s is like?
Are they good at sticking to the road overall and only lose it if pushed to hard or are you living on a knife edge all the time, I appreciate that the load will have some influence in terms of COG and momentum etc again bit like my question on recycling damaged loads the answer will be it depends……..
The load has a huge effect.

I used to do a lot of fridge work.
If it was boxes of product then you could for want of a better phrase - drive it like you’ve stolen it.
On the other hand if I did hanging meat (literally half a cow or a whole lamb hanging from a hook in the trailer) it was a different ball game due to the swinging momentum of the load. Very similar to a liquid load in a tanker.

Basically - modern trucks handle well with good braking capabilities.

The issue lies (and this sounds obvious) in that you have to drive it like a truck - you can’t drive it like a car and I think a lot of HGV drivers nowadays seem to lapse into a car driving mentality be it with lane changes, approaches to junctions, even just going round islands.

Also not forgetting - when it goes wrong - often it goes wrong spectacularly.
 

Troy

LE
Sitting up high often means that you can see the ditch alongside the road that's hidden by long grass to car drivers.

Carrying loads of glass such as sealed double glazed units is heavy and brittle. Vulnerable to pot holes, particularly if it's in racks at the vehicle sides rather than racks in the centre.

Smaller trucks handle much like vans when they are lightly loaded or empty.

When carrying meat on hooks you sometimes notice a swinging effect after doing a bit of "left right left" through small roundabouts.
 

Troy

LE
A little tip I'll give to car drivers... When driving behind a lorry on a country lane keep extra distance from the lorry. This time of the year there are loads of overhanging branches that lorries can't avoid hitting and some of them drop to the road. If you are too close then those falling branches, or even just twigs, will land on your car. Just saying.
 
A little tip I'll give to car drivers... When driving behind a lorry on a country lane keep extra distance from the lorry. This time of the year there are loads of overhanging branches that lorries can't avoid hitting and some of them drop to the road. If you are too close then those falling branches, or even just twigs, will land on your car. Just saying.

Or in my case a few years ago, following a satnav that took me on a guided tour of Headley Court
I took quite a lot of tree with me
 

Truxx

LE
A little tip I'll give to car drivers... When driving behind a lorry on a country lane keep extra distance from the lorry. This time of the year there are loads of overhanging branches that lorries can't avoid hitting and some of them drop to the road. If you are too close then those falling branches, or even just twigs, will land on your car. Just saying.
Or they can knock off bloody great branches off which you hit, jamming your front suspension and causing you to drive off the road.

Don't ask me how I know...
 

Truxx

LE
Or in my case a few years ago, following a satnav that took me on a guided tour of Headley Court
I took quite a lot of tree with me
I had to pick some bits up from deepest darkest Kent which involved at one point following the directions from a local which involved a series of 90 degree bends. My big old recovery ERF had a huge rear overhang especially with the rearmost axle up (vital if I was going to get around the 90 degree bends)

I got back with significant amounts of Kentish hedgerow tangled up in the rear ramps....
 

Truxx

LE
The discussion of speed limits and difficult single carriageway roads prompts me to enquire of you drivers as to what the handling of HGV’s is like?
Are they good at sticking to the road overall and only lose it if pushed to hard or are you living on a knife edge all the time, I appreciate that the load will have some influence in terms of COG and momentum etc again bit like my question on recycling damaged loads the answer will be it depends……..
Ask yourself that question next time that you hear Sally Traffic telling everyone about an overturned lorry on such and such a section of what is essentially a straight road.
 
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9.414

War Hero
Similar problems with a horsebox, as you have a live cargo than feels the bumps and bends and this cargo can move position under its own steam! You may notice that a horsebox may approach and traverse a roundabout very slowly - to the annoyance of other road users. If you take it with a swing the standing horses, like soldiers standing in the back of a truck will possibly step out to brace themselves, and a few tons of horseflesh will instantly move your COG!

It is a particular problem because you must ensure that they do not fall over as they will not be able to get back up in a narrow stall and injuries or death can result. So gentle manoeuvring, braking and acceleration are vitally important.
 
A little tip I'll give to car drivers... When driving behind a lorry on a country lane keep extra distance from the lorry. This time of the year there are loads of overhanging branches that lorries can't avoid hitting and some of them drop to the road. If you are too close then those falling branches, or even just twigs, will land on your car. Just saying.
Public Service Announcement
 
Why do you sometimes see drivers rubbing their brakes on straight bits of motorway when they’re nowhere near a vehicle in front?
Is is to keep it to 56mph or to bring an errant trailer back into line? Or neither?
 

kieren21

Clanker
Why do you sometimes see drivers rubbing their brakes on straight bits of motorway when they’re nowhere near a vehicle in front?
Is is to keep it to 56mph or to bring an errant trailer back into line? Or neither?
I’d guess it’s the cruise control bringing it back to the 56mph limit using the exhaust brake (or whatever the limiter is set too) or the driver doing by manual braking.

The cruise control in trucks often has a +/- setting to allow control of how far under/over the set speed it will allow.

So I can say set + 2 which will allow momentum to take me to 58mph before it’ll automatically apply the exhaust brake to get me back to 56.

I can also set -2 which instructs the cruise control to allow the speed to drop to 54 before it starts working a bit harder by dropping gears etc to regain momentum.

The tachograph logs “overspeeds” after a period of time (a few seconds) at a speed over the limit set. I.e - do 57 downhill for 10 seconds it gets recorded.

Some companies view this as a sin. Others not so much.
 
Why do you sometimes see drivers rubbing their brakes on straight bits of motorway when they’re nowhere near a vehicle in front?
Is is to keep it to 56mph or to bring an errant trailer back into line? Or neither?
A heavy load will push you over the 60mph limit, even on slight slopes.
I deliver steel, so quite regularly I will touch my brakes to bring the speed down and then apply the retarder.
 
A heavy load will push you over the 60mph limit, even on slight slopes.
I deliver steel, so quite regularly I will touch my brakes to bring the speed down and then apply the retarder.

I have a DAF CF that will run up to 72mph down hill on cruise control
It's an older lorry that doesn't automatically put the exhaust brake on when it outruns the limiter

In truth it's rock steady and perfectly stable if you let it do it
It will do it empty or laden, doesn't bother it at all
 

syrup

LE
I have a DAF CF that will run up to 72mph down hill on cruise control
It's an older lorry that doesn't automatically put the exhaust brake on when it outruns the limiter

In truth it's rock steady and perfectly stable if you let it do it
It will do it empty or laden, doesn't bother it at all

The new DAF is a pain in the arse with that driver score thing it has.

I lost a tyre in the middle lane of the M62 and was trying to get to the hard shoulder while it's telling me "strong braking is bad for fuel economy"
Front offside tyre gone fully laden fuel economy wasn't my biggest worry

Same with he over speed

Bing Bing Bing barely above 60 and it's off pinging like a demented submarine
 
The new DAF is a pain in the arse with that driver score thing it has.

I lost a tyre in the middle lane of the M62 and was trying to get to the hard shoulder while it's telling me "strong braking is bad for fuel economy"
Front offside tyre gone fully laden fuel economy wasn't my biggest worry

Same with he over speed

Bing Bing Bing barely above 60 and it's off pinging like a demented submarine

We have a couple of LF's with the score gizmo on the screen
It does work, it helps drivers stay sensible

We also have telematics that screech at the driver if they misbehave
It's not foolproof but it is effective
 

kieren21

Clanker
The new DAF is a pain in the arse with that driver score thing it has.

I lost a tyre in the middle lane of the M62 and was trying to get to the hard shoulder while it's telling me "strong braking is bad for fuel economy"
Front offside tyre gone fully laden fuel economy wasn't my biggest worry

Same with he over speed

Bing Bing Bing barely above 60 and it's off pinging like a demented submarine

You can turn it off - go into the eco settings and turn off “driver coaching tips”

Also press and hold for a couple of seconds the “back/return” button below the dash menu dial and the score will be removed from the dash until the next time the ignition is turned off.
 

syrup

LE
You can turn it off - go into the eco settings and turn off “driver coaching tips”

Also press and hold for a couple of seconds the “back/return” button below the dash menu dial and the score will be removed from the dash until the next time the ignition is turned off.


I was on the agency at the time I had to YOUTUBE where the gearbox was so I could get the thing moving :)
 

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