UK Transport Crisis?

Good point. I have always had in the back of my head that Ogle penned the front end of the loco.

But I could be wrong. It has happened before.

Don’t forget the prototype HST in 1972. Perhaps he designed that. Kenneth Grange tweaked it & came up with the iconic design we know. He also changed the cab interior to be more driver friendly & added a second mans seat.
‘Driver friendly’ may be pushing it a bit. They’re not. ‘A bit better’ would be my opinion.
 

Longlenny

War Hero
Book Reviewer
Fun facts yet again.

The folks who designed the cab of that Leyland (later to be used on our very own DROPS MMLC) was the same team who designed the Reliant Scimitar GTE, the Raleigh Chopper push bike the HS 125 train.and Luke Skywalkers XP34 Landspeeder.
Also designed the Bond Bug, I am embarrassed to admit that I have owned one for 46 years.
 
Also designed the Bond Bug, I am embarrassed to admit that I have owned one for 46 years.
 

Pteranadon

LE
Book Reviewer
May be some good publicity and glamorize the job, thus -


That takes me back to 1981 when 40 field regiment arms plotted to Colchester and became an FH70 Regiment, swapping Abbots and Stalwarts for Foden 6 x 6 tractors and Limbers - real trucks, meant for motorways.

The limber drivers all bought CB rigs and bought into this stuff, re-enacting Convoy on route with ammunition from Kineton to whatever range laden with we were using for practice camp. Unlike the move of guns which were all supervised under the chain of command and supposed to use military convoy speeds, the Limbers which collected the ammunition were seen as an admin detail. I am told that the rear vehicle in a battery packet of six Foden Limbers would pull out into the middle lane and then the rest. Why would the army buy trucks capable of 60 mph but only drive them at 30...
 
Those of us on here that are in the industry can tell the powers that be exactly why people are leaving, or not wanting to join.
I've read every single post on this thread, some are spot on, others are way off the mark.
I personally have made a good living out of driving, since I passed my class one in 2002.
I have no debt, have paid off my mortgage and am quite happy that my wages will increase as of next week.
However, until the
'You're a driver so that means that I can talk to/treat you like s**t' attitude from customers, office staff and other road users changes then people won't be interested in spending upwards of £4,000 to get qualified.
I'm not a militant person but twice last week I've had to tell customers to get the f**k away from me because of their aggressive attitude, which then turns into their bottom lip wobbling, and them ringing my boss to complain about the way I spoke to them.
Hypocrisy of the highest order.
Water off a ducks back to me, but until attitudes change, the driver shortage will not resolve itself.
 
Close the curtains/doors and pull off site makes for a funnier reaction.
Which is exactly what I did on both occasions.
Watching the look on Mr.' I've got a big mouth but nothing to back it up withs' face change from sneering to almost crying was hilarious.
His company also got a bollocking from my boss, who is getting just as annoyed with certain attitudes as we are.
 
Which is exactly what I did on both occasions.
Watching the look on Mr.' I've got a big mouth but nothing to back it up withs' face change from sneering to almost crying was hilarious.
His company also got a bollocking from my boss, who is getting just as annoyed with certain attitudes as we are.

One of the things that constantly surprises me when I get complaints about drivers is that total random strangers on the end of a phone have absolutely no doubt at all that I will automatically take their word for what happened over a driver I may well have known for a decade or more.

Never seems to cross their mind that I will ask the driver and usually get an honest answer

Best one I ever had was a van driver on the M25 had a dispute with one of my drivers and rang up to complain. Gave me his name, contact number, registration, the whole lot

I rang my driver who had just been on the phone to the Police to report being assaulted by an unknown bloke in a road rage incident.
As the other party had kindly called me to complain and gave me all his details I was able to pass all those details on to the Police.
 
Those of us on here that are in the industry can tell the powers that be exactly why people are leaving, or not wanting to join.
I've read every single post on this thread, some are spot on, others are way off the mark.
I personally have made a good living out of driving, since I passed my class one in 2002.
I have no debt, have paid off my mortgage and am quite happy that my wages will increase as of next week.
However, until the
'You're a driver so that means that I can talk to/treat you like s**t' attitude from customers, office staff and other road users changes then people won't be interested in spending upwards of £4,000 to get qualified.
I'm not a militant person but twice last week I've had to tell customers to get the f**k away from me because of their aggressive attitude, which then turns into their bottom lip wobbling, and them ringing my boss to complain about the way I spoke to them.
Hypocrisy of the highest order.
Water off a ducks back to me, but until attitudes change, the driver shortage will not resolve itself.

Takes me back to time when I didn't have direct responsibility for transport but I always tried to be nice to our drivers! I saw them as reps for the company, first and possibly only point of contact with a lot of customers, and the vast majority did that very well. One big advantage was if we got QA problems. Keep your drivers "on side" and they'll tell you what really happens at the other end - very useful to know!
 
A long term fwb (no pics) took the plunge a few years ago and retrained from care home worker to coach driver.
Doing absolutely fine, company has a rural school bus contract plus she does saga type coach Holidays with the types of people she had years of experience with.
Not forgetting the jap tourists doing the if its Tuesday it must be Grasmere experience...very good for tips but extremely unadventurous, rarely stray more than 1/2 mile from the coach, I expect they're expecting a Grandarse round every corner!
 
That takes me back to 1981 when 40 field regiment arms plotted to Colchester and became an FH70 Regiment, swapping Abbots and Stalwarts for Foden 6 x 6 tractors and Limbers - real trucks, meant for motorways.

The limber drivers all bought CB rigs and bought into this stuff, re-enacting Convoy on route with ammunition from Kineton to whatever range laden with we were using for practice camp. Unlike the move of guns which were all supervised under the chain of command and supposed to use military convoy speeds, the Limbers which collected the ammunition were seen as an admin detail. I am told that the rear vehicle in a battery packet of six Foden Limbers would pull out into the middle lane and then the rest. Why would the army buy trucks capable of 60 mph but only drive them at 30...
[drift]

That would be when I slept in a room in the attic of the Officers' Mess. A couple of your lads, had been "volunteered" as Mess Waiters ( . . . or, was that normal ?). And, there were a pair of FH70 parked outside the entrance of the Officers' Mess as "Guards".

I was in Colchester as a Member of a number of Courts Marshall.

Can't say any more than that . . . ;) .

[/drift]
 
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I personally have made a good living out of driving, since I passed my class one in 2002.
I have no debt, have paid off my mortgage and am quite happy that my wages will increase as of next week.
I should hope so
 

stuskimac

Old-Salt
Those of us on here that are in the industry can tell the powers that be exactly why people are leaving, or not wanting to join.
I've read every single post on this thread, some are spot on, others are way off the mark.
I personally have made a good living out of driving, since I passed my class one in 2002.
I have no debt, have paid off my mortgage and am quite happy that my wages will increase as of next week.
However, until the
'You're a driver so that means that I can talk to/treat you like s**t' attitude from customers, office staff and other road users changes then people won't be interested in spending upwards of £4,000 to get qualified.
I'm not a militant person but twice last week I've had to tell customers to get the f**k away from me because of their aggressive attitude, which then turns into their bottom lip wobbling, and them ringing my boss to complain about the way I spoke to them.
Hypocrisy of the highest order.
Water off a ducks back to me, but until attitudes change, the driver shortage will not resolve itself.
I have been in the transport industry as a driver since 1996, started out as a van driver doing local multidrop for 2 years, then on to national 24/7 courier white van man type stuff for a further 2 years. Got my LGV licence cat C in the August of 2000 & started doing class 2 multidrop work. The following year around late spring got my cat C+E in2001, but didn't start driving Artics till around August 2001. I started driving Artics on nights, straight forward night trunking, one hit easy work. Certainly easier than daytime multidrop on Cat 2's or vans for that matter. I've been doing class 1 work on nights ever since, it suits me well as I've always been a night owl, don't like early morning starts or traffic & I guess thats my forte. I think you find your niche in this industry & stick to it or leave it totally.
I just do general haulage, I've done mostly curtain work, boxes, fridge & double deckers & moved around alot of jobs, I think its the nature of the job. The longest place I worked for was 8 &1/2 years till made redundant ( 2 days before Xmas, cheers DHL!!! c*@ts"), most other places 2-5 years max. Some jobs are what I would call a "cushy number" & have had a fair few of them, but they never last. Contracts end, go tits up or just change, either way the job loses its appeal & I move onto something else, drivers vote with there feet. And over the years you often meet old drivers who have also moved on along the way, this seems to happen more the longer you stay in the industry, you get to know people & places. There are always those jobs everyones had a crack at, again nature of the beast.
Most of the drivers I've met & worked with, have been alot older, in there 50's to 60's & probably coming up for retirement now. I'm 50 now but really don't want to be doing this job in my 60's. The only young drivers in the last 10 years I've met have mainly been Eastern Europeans, some great lads & some not so great. Whether these guys from Europe will stay as a result of Brexit or the changes of the tax rules for Ltd companies I do not know, but if they do leave there WILL be a big hole to fill. There doesn't seem to be alot of young homegrown talent coming into the industry. I think its a bit like the farm workers & fruit/veg pickers, British youth have no great desire to do it. Its long unsociable hours, 24/7 industry, no real great prospects & i wouldn't say the wage is that enticing either.
Driver treatment is too be expected I guess, we're pretty much bottom of the pile, we're not the knights of the roads some would have you believe, but we are human. I've had many run-ins over the years, usually just with someone with a bad attitude probably having a bad day & lashing out, but I give as good as I get. Its normally just an individual person causing a problem not the firm or company your working for or with, however there are exceptions to the rule.
The industry has changed, we're a 24/7 industry, drivers are working more unsociable hours like Sat/Sun, days, early's,lates, nights & twilights (midnight starts, otherwise known as graveyards shifts). There's too much traffic on the roads ( pre & post covid ) both day & night. Live tracking, gps, mobile phones & all other tech pushing drivers to the max, trying to get the most out of them.
When I started lorry driving 20 years ago, the average hourly rate in the E.Midlands for a class 1 driver was £8-£10, the average now is £10-£12, that's a pretty shit progression I reckon for 20 years. When I started driving trucks I was told class 1 work was were there money was, I've been chasing that golden carrot ever since! Christ I know forklift drivers & van drivers earning that much! If I could find a 9pm to 5pm Mon-Fri non driving job that paid the same wage i'd be gone in a flash, but they don't exist, so for now I'm stuck in this Industry.
And as for Joe public who clap us as Key workers, keeping the supply chain going, hauling there Amazon delivery or Asda produce, spare part for the car, or whatever essential shit we pull, they still wouldn't think twice about racing us to the next roundabout, slip road exit, cutting us up/brake check or whatever just so long as we don't get in the way of there ever so important lives. We're just bottom of the pile.
 
Good point. I have always had in the back of my head that Ogle penned the front end of the loco.

But I could be wrong. It has happened before.
Pedant hat on and apologies for thread drift. David Ogle died in a road accident in 1962. Very few of the designs credited to Ogle Design were his; he did the Ogle SX 2000 car and the original Scimitar coupe (not the GTE). (and, BTW the Scimitar design was originally done for Daimler to replace the SP250 Dart. When Jaguar bought Daimler, it was binned and later sold to Reliant).

The vast majority of what are known as Ogle designs are actually credited to Tom Karen, who was brought in when David Ogle died. The Scimitar GTE was one of his.

Tom Karen’s best known design is probably Luke Skywalker’s Landspeeder.
 

Truxx

LE
Pedant hat on and apologies for thread drift. David Ogle died in a road accident in 1962. Very few of the designs credited to Ogle Design were his; he did the Ogle SX 2000 car and the original Scimitar coupe (not the GTE). (and, BTW the Scimitar design was originally done for Daimler to replace the SP250 Dart. When Jaguar bought Daimler, it was binned and later sold to Reliant).

The vast majority of what are known as Ogle designs are actually credited to Tom Karen, who was brought in when David Ogle died. The Scimitar GTE was one of his.

Tom Karen’s best known design is probably Luke Skywalker’s Landspeeder.
Pedant mode myself,

my original post referred to the Ogle team, rather than the man himself, and therefore that follow on post did too.

Pedant mode off.
 
Things are looking up salary wise....



Cheers for that, I've just forwarded it to our company HR Manager.....

I did tell him last week several of the TM's within the company were actively thinking of getting behind the wheel elsewhere. He didn't look happy bless him
 

Truxx

LE
Cheers for that, I've just forwarded it to our company HR Manager.....

I did tell him last week several of the TM's within the company were actively thinking of getting behind the wheel elsewhere. He didn't look happy bless him
They seem a good bunch to work for too, lots of CPD as well as in house CPC. I would be tempted I must say.
 

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