UK Transport Crisis?

Gents,
I'm gonna ask the following question on this ongoing thread rather than starting a new thread simply because this thread is a sensible one and no one has trolled it.
I've already mentioned on here that I'd like to go over to HGV work, and that my theory test etc is booked for next month. The problem is that next week I'm starting a new job back as a Sparkie. The money at the moment is though the roof. Sparking is what I've done for most of my working life, with the exceptions of the army, the fitness industry, and the prison service. No matter what change of direction I have taken I have always ended up back working as a Sparkie. It's what I know, but it has never been a job that I loved to do. Hence why I changed careers a few times.
Why I now have my heart set on lorry driving I'll never know, but the fact that you are on your own, and that you don't have people standing over you all day is what appeals to me the most. I'm never gonna earn the sort of money driving wagons that I would earn as a sparkie - at least not in the first few years anyway, but I'm not in a position now where I have to chase every penny. Doing a job that I enjoy is my number one priority nowadays.
Sparky wise, it's just your typical 40 odd hours a week. But it can be hard physical work at times, and lets face it, I ain't a spring chicken anymore. That was one of the main reasons that I jacked in the prison service.
HGV wise, I know that I'm gonna be working long hours but if it's something that I'm enjoying doing then long hours won't bother me much.
My partner wants me to do a job that I enjoy doing, and she certainly isn't the kind of woman who expects me to earn big money. After all, sparking or HGV I'm never gonna come close to earning what she does anyway.
My head is telling me to stick with sparking, whilst my heart is saying change careers yet again and go over to HGV work.
Stick to sparkying for an income, and do agency driving on the weekends if you must.
If you're used to regular 40 hour weeks, jumping straight into full time trucking will do neither body nor bank much good.
There're good reasons so many truckers jack it in their 50s.
 
Stick to sparkying for an income, and do agency driving on the weekends if you must.
If you're used to regular 40 hour weeks, jumping straight into full time trucking will do neither body nor bank much good.
There're good reasons so many truckers jack it in their 50s.
And the age thing mate is also the biggest drawback in sparking mate. Yes, I can see the scaffolders laughing at this comment in the back there, but I'll be 50 on my next birthday, and I know all too well just how physically hard working on site can be. And I'm not some sort of obese fecker fit only for the knackers yard, I am still in reasonably good health and fitness.
 

stuskimac

Old-Salt
Gents,
I'm gonna ask the following question on this ongoing thread rather than starting a new thread simply because this thread is a sensible one and no one has trolled it.
I've already mentioned on here that I'd like to go over to HGV work, and that my theory test etc is booked for next month. The problem is that next week I'm starting a new job back as a Sparkie. The money at the moment is though the roof. Sparking is what I've done for most of my working life, with the exceptions of the army, the fitness industry, and the prison service. No matter what change of direction I have taken I have always ended up back working as a Sparkie. It's what I know, but it has never been a job that I loved to do. Hence why I changed careers a few times.
Why I now have my heart set on lorry driving I'll never know, but the fact that you are on your own, and that you don't have people standing over you all day is what appeals to me the most. I'm never gonna earn the sort of money driving wagons that I would earn as a sparkie - at least not in the first few years anyway, but I'm not in a position now where I have to chase every penny. Doing a job that I enjoy is my number one priority nowadays.
Sparky wise, it's just your typical 40 odd hours a week. But it can be hard physical work at times, and lets face it, I ain't a spring chicken anymore. That was one of the main reasons that I jacked in the prison service.
HGV wise, I know that I'm gonna be working long hours but if it's something that I'm enjoying doing then long hours won't bother me much.
My partner wants me to do a job that I enjoy doing, and she certainly isn't the kind of woman who expects me to earn big money. After all, sparking or HGV I'm never gonna come close to earning what she does anyway.
My head is telling me to stick with sparking, whilst my heart is saying change careers yet again and go over to HGV work.
Based on all you've said, I think you should give it a go, as you've mentioned you always have your sparky work to fall back on if it doesn't work out. Not all hgv work is hard, the're cushy jobs to be had & on agency you can pretty much dictate the kind of work/hours you want to do these days & a lot of firms don't want agency drivers doing long hours because it costs too much! Trucks are pretty easy to drive now, mostly automatic with plenty of comfort, so not as physicaly demanding. 50 is not old by lorry driving standards, I would hazard a guess the average lorry driver is older, theres a lot of over 60's driving trucks these days.
From a general haulage POV, most class 2 work tends to be local, mostly multidrop & most class 1 work tends to 1 or 2 drops & average 2 to 3 hours from base, there are exceptions to this of coarse & there are trampers who sleep out a number of nights a week, if not all week. And of coarse there is niche work, like steel, timber, plant etc etc. This is just briefly touching the whole subjects, there's tippers, tankers, car transporters, containers and lots of other stuff, not all the same, some more demanding than others, you just need to find what you enjoy the most, you'll never know till you try it, good luck anyway.

Edited to add: I'm an ex stab, 51, fit & healthy, not fat, no tatoos & I haven't murdered any prostitutes!
 
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Truxx

LE
Seriously, does anyone have anything positive to say about the CPC? My understanding is that it is a complete joke. Which wouldn't surprise me in the least. After all, even the official DVSA guidebooks tell you stuff that just doesn't happen in real world.
Just last week on this very thread in fact; I was told that despite DVSA guidelines telling you to, you would not in reality put all of the ratchets on your blindside but that you would stagger them. The same with metal loads, the book states that such loads must be secured with chains but as someone pointed out to me; what if said metal load was then scratched by the chains during transport? The chains could potentially rub off a protective coating on the metal for example.
Is there actually any official guidelines out there that are based on real world experience?
I thought that some of the electrical regs were rediculous but I've never seen an official electrical reg that could potentially damage a client's property.
The guidelines have been posted on here a couple of times.

Agreed on CPC. I am all for continuous professional development but CPC is a useless box ticking exercise.

As for chains/straps the guidance helpfully says that chains should be used, but if straps are used they should be protected from chafing.

The nearside ratchet nonsense must have been thought of by someone who drives a desk as I can think of a dozen reasons why you might want to deviate from that.
 

Truxx

LE
Based on all you've said, I think you should give it a go, as you've mentioned you always have your sparky work to fall back on if it doesn't work out. Not all hgv work is hard, the're cushy jobs to be had & on agency you can pretty much dictate the kind of work/hours you want to do these days & a lot of firms don't want agency drivers doing long hours because it costs too much! Trucks are pretty easy to drive now, mostly automatic with plenty of comfort, so not as physicaly demanding. 50 is not old by lorry driving standards, I would hazard a guess the average lorry driver is older, theres a lot of over 60's driving trucks these days.
From a general haulage POV, most class 2 work tends to be local, mostly multidrop & most class 1 work tends to 1 or 2 drops & average 2 to 3 hours from base, there are exceptions to this of coarse & there are trampers who sleep out a number of nights a week, if not all week. And of coarse there is niche work, like steel, timber, plant etc etc. This is just briefly touching the whole subjects, there's tippers, tankers, car transporters, containers and lots of other stuff, not all the same, some more demanding than others, you just need to find what you enjoy the most, you'll never know till you try it, good luck anyway.

Edited to add: I'm an ex stab, 51, fit & healthy, not fat, no tatoos & I haven't murdered any prostitutes!
50 is well below the average age of a UK truck driver (58 I think)
 

exbluejob

LE
Book Reviewer
And the age thing mate is also the biggest drawback in sparking mate. Yes, I can see the scaffolders laughing at this comment in the back there, but I'll be 50 on my next birthday, and I know all too well just how physically hard working on site can be. And I'm not some sort of obese fecker fit only for the knackers yard, I am still in reasonably good health and fitness.
Scaffolding is easy:
 
The nearside ratchet nonsense must have been thought of by someone who drives a desk as I can think of a dozen reasons why you might want to deviate from that.
Must keep the driver safe as they only ever strap a load stood next to a live carriageway... The fact they have to go round the other side to secure the strap and actually stand further back to 'hoike' it over is neither here nor there...
 
I thought you were a professional FFS
What kind of example do you think that is setting?

Have a word with yourself....

Standards man, standards
He's building up to murdering a prostitute. He gave a rent boy a Chinese burn last time out.
 

Truxx

LE
Must keep the driver safe as they only ever strap a load stood next to a live carriageway... The fact they have to go round the other side to secure the strap and actually stand further back to 'hoike' it over is neither here nor there...
Most of the people who write these things are unlikely to have inhabited the real world.
 
Gents,
I'm gonna ask the following question on this ongoing thread rather than starting a new thread simply because this thread is a sensible one and no one has trolled it.
I've already mentioned on here that I'd like to go over to HGV work, and that my theory test etc is booked for next month. The problem is that next week I'm starting a new job back as a Sparkie. The money at the moment is though the roof. Sparking is what I've done for most of my working life, with the exceptions of the army, the fitness industry, and the prison service. No matter what change of direction I have taken I have always ended up back working as a Sparkie. It's what I know, but it has never been a job that I loved to do. Hence why I changed careers a few times.
Why I now have my heart set on lorry driving I'll never know, but the fact that you are on your own, and that you don't have people standing over you all day is what appeals to me the most. I'm never gonna earn the sort of money driving wagons that I would earn as a sparkie - at least not in the first few years anyway, but I'm not in a position now where I have to chase every penny. Doing a job that I enjoy is my number one priority nowadays.
Sparky wise, it's just your typical 40 odd hours a week. But it can be hard physical work at times, and lets face it, I ain't a spring chicken anymore. That was one of the main reasons that I jacked in the prison service.
HGV wise, I know that I'm gonna be working long hours but if it's something that I'm enjoying doing then long hours won't bother me much.
My partner wants me to do a job that I enjoy doing, and she certainly isn't the kind of woman who expects me to earn big money. After all, sparking or HGV I'm never gonna come close to earning what she does anyway.
My head is telling me to stick with sparking, whilst my heart is saying change careers yet again and go over to HGV work.
I know little or nothing about either job, but I do know that if you don't give it a go, you will always wonder if you should have.
I was made redundant after 15 years working for the AA, I had enjoyed teaching on a motorcycle training scheme at the weekend. I thought I would like to start my own business doing the same.
However I soon realised that it wasn't the same as doing it as a hobby, even though I had enjoyed it enormously on that basis.
Go for it.
 
If your qualified as a sparkie and can earn a living from it, are you sure you want to drive HGVs? I do it as a means to an end.
I don’t have a trade, so have been driving vehicles on and off for the last 12 years.

Eight years of which were on the buses. It was only a few months ago , I decided to switch to trucks, as the money is better.

Obviously, the logistics industry is a big field and it depends on who you work for, what your delivering etc.

Again, it’s a job that pays money into my bank account.

I work for one of the big waste companies, it’s not physically hard work, but they’re very **** about everything.
Some of the house hold waste sites can be pretty tight to get into.
 
.......Sparky wise, it's just your typical 40 odd hours a week. But it can be hard physical work at times, and lets face it, I ain't a spring chicken anymore. That was one of the main reasons that I jacked in the prison service.
HGV wise, I know that I'm gonna be working long hours but if it's something that I'm enjoying doing then long hours won't bother me much........

I'm no spring chicken either, hard physical work and long hours are both tiring, maybe in different ways.

Having said that, I'd agree with the other advice - have a go.
 

Truxx

LE
Every bulk tipper runs about 100 kg under 44 tonne if he’s any good, all the time.!
But bulkers and tippers are in the minority when it comes to truck/miles.

I spent a long time in the port game. Nominally a 20foot container is 20 Tonne. I can count the number of boxes that I dealt with in my time that had anywhere near 20t in them on the fingers of one foot.

Apart from one Polish box that arrived at the railhead in Skopje. We had been issued with a terrible thing called a CHRT, Container Handler Rough Terrain. The box was billed as containing power pack and ancillaries and weighed in at about 18.6t. What we did not know was that it was 18.5t at one end of the box and 0.1 t at the other. So up it went off the railflat, back went the CHRT and thud.

Over onto its side went the whole lot.

But, like I said, rare
 

syrup

LE
And the age thing mate is also the biggest drawback in sparking mate. Yes, I can see the scaffolders laughing at this comment in the back there, but I'll be 50 on my next birthday, and I know all too well just how physically hard working on site can be. And I'm not some sort of obese fecker fit only for the knackers yard, I am still in reasonably good health and fitness.


Are you still under the age to re-apply for another stint in the T.A.

Get an RLC unit and drive trucks there
 

Irish traffic to the UK down by 30% according to Stena Line

I would have expected more than that, evidently the direct ferry routes to the EU from Ireland aren't as attractive as some had suggested they would be
What proportion of the remaining traffic is UK destined and what is land bridge is not evident
 
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Are you still under the age to re-apply for another stint in the T.A.

Get an RLC unit and drive trucks there
From (limited) personal experience, TA RLC units do not actually get out in the trucks very much.

This may well vary unit to unit and squadron to squadron.
 
From (limited) personal experience, TA RLC units do not actually get out in the trucks very much.

This may well vary unit to unit and squadron to squadron.
They do get to paint them though...
 

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