UK Transport Crisis?

How does a new driver get trained properly? They scrape through a test as quickly as they can, CPC doesn't go far enough with the hands-on side - not what it's about anyway, and companies can't be arrsed providing proper training. So it's become a £9 per hour job.

He only gets to learn the gritty bits if his first employer can be arsed to teach him

If not, he learns it the hard way all by himself
Sadly the latter is normal
 

Truxx

LE
How does a new driver get trained properly? They scrape through a test as quickly as they can, CPC doesn't go far enough with the hands-on side - not what it's about anyway, and companies can't be arrsed providing proper training. So it's become a £9 per hour job.
As the old saying goes, good truckers ain't cheap and cheap truckers ain't good
 

stuskimac

Old-Salt
I always took the time to ensure loads were loaded and restrained properly, even then I did have two incidents that reminded me that even with care shit happens.

I was driving for Hovis, the bread trays were restrained with a spreader bar across the rear, this failed on one occasion, loaves of bread everywhere in the back of the wagon. I felt quite guilty as deliveries were late. Tescos in Skeggy had a right arse on, which helped me out as it saved sorting their order. The warehouse manager was really abusive. When he took breath I informed him that I was an agency driver and that they would always employ me because I’d make myself available at short notice. Then as I went to pull out I informed him that as he had refused receipt they would still be billed (I’ve no idea if this was true or not). M&S also refused, no abuse, they just said “sorry, it’s not to the contracted standard”.

The other time was dealing roof trusses to a building site, they hadn’t graded the road/track and I was quite concerned about getting bogged in and must have driven too fast. When I removed the restraints a few of the trusses fell. Nothing was damaged and no one was injured, but there was still that heart in the mouth moment.

Other issues I had was the customer putting the forks through a windscreen I was delivering. I was Straight on the phone to the firm to let them know it arrived in perfect condition.

Firms who expect you to answer your phone whilst driving. I always turned mine off.

Minging cabs - refused to drive them.

Firms expecting you to work beyond drivers hours - fücked off at the high port.

Had a woman claimed I’d hit her car, didn’t happen no damage to the wagon, just a chancer. I was chased for a couple of years over that, fortunately the hire agency refused to give direct contact details to the firms.

I know I may not be as experienced as many on here, but I‘m sure just those few will ring true with many.
Yep sounds about right, I can pretty much relate to everything you've said, not much has changed either in this industry, well not for the better any how.
 

stuskimac

Old-Salt
He only gets to learn the gritty bits if his first employer can be arsed to teach him

If not, he learns it the hard way all by himself
Sadly the latter is normal
Yep on the job training, learn as you go. You pass your test, shuffle on to the agency to begin your new chosen career. Turn up for your first job, keys & paperwork thrown at you & directions to the yard & off you go, sink or swim. I was never afraid to ask for help & advice, & watched how other drivers did stuff & learnt from them. I also made classic mistakes & learnt from them too. Its a steep curve initially, but it gets easier as you get along learning the ropes, something the the driving test never teaches. The DCPC qualification now required to work does help for new drivers, but its only theory, not practical hands on stuff, thats how you really gain your skills, doing the job.
 

No Boots

Clanker
He only gets to learn the gritty bits if his first employer can be arsed to teach him

If not, he learns it the hard way all by himself
Sadly the latter is normal
And quite a few think, if you can't help me bugger this I'll find a different career.
But most of us probably all learnt most of our skills from older and wiser drivers, who knew from experience, nowadays tho everyone is in a rush to get out the yard
 
Good drivers are paid the same rates as the bad, there's no distinction with employers, we're just bums on seats!

I'm probably as guilty of that as any other TM in the job if I'm honest

Sometimes the temptation to dismiss somebody as just another whinging driver is very strong indeed

The good guys get loaded with the hard work and the idle get away with it because there aren't enough good guys to go around
 

stuskimac

Old-Salt
M
Manual box not now required on test if you have a manual car licence apparently
Correct, I've met many new drivers who've only ever driven auto box trucks, passed there test on them. I was told there is no longer the gear changing exercise part of the test? I love auto box trucks, there a doddle, but maybe too easy "a lazy mans truck". I cut my teeth on range change/splitter boxes, which are not hard to master, you just had to take your time, not rush the changes. You learned to take your time & plan ahead. Poor use of the gear box could result in a burnt out clutch &/or a shot load. I think its a valuable skill that's now lost on new drivers, who sometimes drive a truck like a car & wonder why when things go wrong.
 
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Yep on the job training, learn as you go. You pass your test, shuffle on to the agency to begin your new chosen career. Turn up for your first job, keys & paperwork thrown at you & directions to the yard & off you go, sink or swim....

You wouldn't think we're in the 21st Century! Most other industries are getting a grip on competence and training, that's been happening for quite a long time. But as you say - with haulage throw the keys across the desk and off you go.
 

Truxx

LE
Correct, I've met many new drivers who've only ever driven auto box trucks, passed there test on them. I was told there is no longer the gear changing exercise part of the test? I love auto box trucks, there a doddle, but maybe too easy "a lazy mans truck". I cut my teeth on range change/splitter boxes, which are not hard to master, you just had to take your time, not rush the changes. You learned to take your time & plan ahead. Poor use of the gear box could result in a burnt out clutch &/or a shot load. I think its a valuable skill that's now lost on new drivers, who sometimes drive a truck like a car & wonder why when things go wrong.
I suspect I learned more road craft from driving a twin splitter than any other thing I have driven mostly because any failure to read the road and traffic properly was rewarded with a box full of neutrals.

Lapse in concentration? Box of neutrals.

Fail to spot the change in incline? Box of neutrals.

Wearing odd socks? Box of neutrals.

Left the bog seat up in the downstairs loo? Box of neutrals.

Also excellent for teaching driving economy.

But probably best consigned to the history books.
 

No Boots

Clanker
Correct, I've met many new drivers who've only ever driven auto box trucks, passed there test on them. I was told there is no longer the gear changing exercise part of the test? I love auto box trucks, there a doddle, but maybe too easy "a lazy mans truck". I cut my teeth on range change/splitter boxes, which are not hard to master, you just had to take your time, not rush the changes. You learned to take your time & plan ahead. Poor use of the gear box could result in a burnt out clutch &/or a shot load. I think its a valuable skill that's now lost on new drivers, who sometimes drive a truck like a car & wonder why when things go wrong.
Trouble is nowadays they are steerers, drivers are oldskool now and a dying breed.
 
I may be in the minority here but I prefer a manual gearbox.
In my opinion it gives me more control when reversing and also at junctions and lights.
But they are becoming obsolete, so I'll adapt and move with the times.
The company I work for only move steel, and it's virtually impossible to get young blood into our yard.
The average age of our drivers is fifty, we only have one under forty.
New drivers don't want the hassle of loading twenty odd tons of bar, sheet or pack, barring it into position and strapping or strangling on a dirty, dusty bed.
They'd much rather go to one of the three DPD depots in my area, pick up a pre loaded trailer and trunk to another depot, swap and run back.
Can't say that I blame them, but it isn't looking good as far as recruiting goes.
Even the agencies are struggling to supply us.
 

No Boots

Clanker
+1 for the manual box, the amount of times when coming to more or less a halt at a roundabout and an automatic hesitates, decides what it is going to do, then carry on & you have some irate car driver who thinks you have pulled out in front of him.
How would a new driver get on nowadys with an up & over beam on a rigid, chaining it down whilst it's p***ing it down or on an icy morning.
 
Not read the whole thread, but I’m sure that poxy pointless, useless, time consuming, Govt money spinner known as the CPC has something to do with putting drivers off.
It certainly has on the bus & coach side.
 
Not read the whole thread, but I’m sure that poxy pointless, useless, time consuming, Govt money spinner known as the CPC has something to do with putting drivers off.
It certainly has on the bus & coach side.
As far as drivers are concerned, it's a complete waste of time and money.
The last three that I've done were in an office, being lectured to by a woman who didn't hold an HGV licence and there was no practical, which is what new drivers need.
 
As far as drivers are concerned, it's a complete waste of time and money.
The last three that I've done were in an office, being lectured to by a woman who didn't hold an HGV licence and there was no practical, which is what new drivers need.

I’m overdue 2. I really can’t be bothered!
The thought of sitting in a room for 8 hours and being patronised doesn’t do much for me.
I’m not saying I know it all, no one does, but after 29yrs driving they’re not going to teach me much. The proof that it’s all crap is that I could do a full week of courses & do the same module (1 of 5) every day and still get my DQC.
If I have to see those drink drive, mobile phone etc videos once more I may start to self harm.

Now, I’m for an 18yr old newbie doing it for the first 3 years or so to knock the drainpipe exhaust boy racer mentality out of him, but not experienced hands.
It’s a total waste of time & money.
 
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Troy

LE
As far as drivers are concerned, it's a complete waste of time and money.
The last three that I've done were in an office, being lectured to by a woman who didn't hold an HGV licence and there was no practical, which is what new drivers need.
The last one I did in April was done by Zoom, and for most of it I was lounging in bed! I had nothing else to do at the time as I was recovering from a cracked head, but it was still a waste of money.
 

Troy

LE
The proof that it’s all crap is that I could do a full week of courses & do the same module (1 of 5) every day and still get my DQC.
That bit has ended now, as DLVA finally caught on to this and run a database check to stop this from happening.
 

endure

GCM
Trouble is nowadays they are steerers, drivers are oldskool now and a dying breed.
One of the jobs I had after leaving school in the late 60s was working in the traffic office of a local haulier. We had half a dozen 6 wheelers (Foden?), 2 Scamell 8 wheelers and 2 ERF tractors.

I remember sitting in the cab of one of the Scamells and wondering what the iron bar sticking up out of the floor was. Turns out it was the gear change lever... :wink:
 

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