UK Transport Crisis?

The decision was made.

It was 1978 and B troop were fed up with 16 ER 36

Or "damien" as it rapidly became known as soon as the Omen film came out.

It was a Mk1AEC with a reputation for being the least reliable of a very unreliable bunch of trucks.

It would be killed.

So a couple of likely coves were volunteered to kill it. All the oil was drained and put in a couple of cans which were thrown on the back.

It was then driven, with a vengance, out of barracks and, eventually onto the "spaghetti junction" just north of Duisburg.

It actually made a couple of circuits before inevitably coming to a very noisy and very smelly and very sudden halt.

At which point the crew poured all the oil back into the smoking engine, chucked the empty tins down the embankment to hide the evidence and called REME duty recovery

"Engine siezed" they said when the wrecker arrived.

Up jumps the Reem into the cab, flicks the starter at which Damien bursts back into life.

I dont think that they make them like that any more.

I once got a 3.9 Range Rover so hot the engine ground to a halt, just slowed and stopped.
It had always been a noisey and lacklustre engine. Until I cooked it

Once cooled down it fired right up and ran like a dollar watch!
 
On the buses ( again!) the first driver does a first use check . Any defect is wrote on the defect card , including dash warning lights.The engine management light or emissions light are the most common.
They get it signed off by the duty mechanic before leaving the yard, this is any defect observed by the first use driver.
If a defect occurs on the road, again this is reported by the driver to control office by radio/ phone.
As Roy Walker said on Catchphrase- “Say what you see “.
Cover your own arse.
 

Truxx

LE
I once got a 3.9 Range Rover so hot the engine ground to a halt, just slowed and stopped.
It had always been a noisey and lacklustre engine. Until I cooked it

Once cooled down it fired right up and ran like a dollar watch!
When he left school and not wanting to go to university my son got a job instead at a company called Scott Gibbins (sp) who were a spin-off from Perkins specialising in engine test and development.

The job involved hooking prototype engines up to dynamometers, testing them then stripping, measuring etc etc etc to inform manufacturers how good bad or indifferent the engines were.

One job they did was destructive testing of engines. An engine with no lubricant or cooling would be run up under load till it failed (normally 4-5 minutes), then it would be stripped and components carefully measured and assessed.

One case in point was a Bentley which was duly hooked up, fired up and run at 60% power till it failed.

Which took 18 hours.

It was a further 6 hours before it was cool enough to put a spanner on.
 

anglo

LE
I once drove for a boss who, although mad keen on servicing, was loathe to call out a repair crew if the wagon could make it home.
His favourite saying was " let it develop".
So there I am, Friday afternoon, fully laden but only about 20 miles from base and a long weekend off, when there's an ominous rattle below the cab. I pulled in, due a 15 min break anyway, and called it in.
"Let it develop" says he.
15 minutes break over, I pull out, and there's a loud bang, some smaller bangs, hisses, frizzling, and assorted bits in the road. I call the boss :" it's developed" says I, " the fan bearing's blown, the fan's sheared off and gone through the radiator and intercooler, and the front grille, and it's chopped whatever hoses and cables were in the way."
BOSS.........BOSS, YOU still there, BOSS

Just kidding
 

syrup

LE
On the buses ( again!) the first driver does a first use check . Any defect is wrote on the defect card , including dash warning lights.The engine management light or emissions light are the most common.
They get it signed off by the duty mechanic before leaving the yard, this is any defect observed by the first use driver.
If a defect occurs on the road, again this is reported by the driver to control office by radio/ phone.
As Roy Walker said on Catchphrase- “Say what you see “.
Cover your own arse.


Our FLT's have a FOB
Driver put the FOB in and it asks him a load of questions as part of the pre use checks.
Simple tick or cross about the functionality and if the truck is safe to use.
We then know which driver checked it when

Tried to get something similar when I was on Transport but the union shop steward blocked it.
 
Our FLT's have a FOB
Driver put the FOB in and it asks him a load of questions as part of the pre use checks.
Simple tick or cross about the functionality and if the truck is safe to use.
We then know which driver checked it when

Tried to get something similar when I was on Transport but the union shop steward blocked it.


We use an electronic proof of delivery device.
In order for the driver to download his runlist for the day he must first sign off his daily checks.
All checks are digitially recorded permanently and any defect logged is automatically emailed to the office

Doesn't stop the idiots from signing off a vehicle as in perfect working order with no defects for a week after they do actually notice a problem.
It isn't that uncommon for defects to go unreported for several days (usually dash warnings) and in some cases weeks.

Never underestimate stupid.
Drivers, first to complain about a broken vehicle but never the first to admit damage or report defects

It's not as if they have to pay for the repairs
 
Found it too . . .

250px-Sidelifter_in_forest.jpg


But, again, it only seems to be a lift on/lift off, arrangement - with no swinging-through from one-side-to-the other, which is definitely what I remember :( .


EDIT: plus more from here . . .

Ekalift-container-handling-trailer-32992_16.jpg



I remember us having a demo of that, and a very very closely-supervised 'play', around 1990. I recall the trans-shipping crane thing being in between the railcar and the receiving DROPS wagon too, but I vaguely recall the crane being a rigid rather than an artic. Long ago now.

You know that thing about knowing if there was a pilot in the room? The adjutant was very proud of being a ship's master, so the same goes for skippers apparently (yes, RCT used to run ships too).
 
We use an electronic proof of delivery device.
In order for the driver to download his runlist for the day he must first sign off his daily checks.
All checks are digitially recorded permanently and any defect logged is automatically emailed to the office

Doesn't stop the idiots from signing off a vehicle as in perfect working order with no defects for a week after they do actually notice a problem.
It isn't that uncommon for defects to go unreported for several days (usually dash warnings) and in some cases weeks.

Never underestimate stupid.
Drivers, first to complain about a broken vehicle but never the first to admit damage or report defects

It's not as if they have to pay for the repairs

What’s so difficult for them to report the defects? Surely it’s better to deal with any problems in the yard or depot, than having issues on the road?
 

syrup

LE
We use an electronic proof of delivery device.
In order for the driver to download his runlist for the day he must first sign off his daily checks.
All checks are digitially recorded permanently and any defect logged is automatically emailed to the office

Doesn't stop the idiots from signing off a vehicle as in perfect working order with no defects for a week after they do actually notice a problem.
It isn't that uncommon for defects to go unreported for several days (usually dash warnings) and in some cases weeks.

Never underestimate stupid.
Drivers, first to complain about a broken vehicle but never the first to admit damage or report defects

It's not as if they have to pay for the repairs


Just had a driver drop a trailer on a bay for loading with no offside rear light cluster
Says he never noticed even when he put his Reg Plate on.
It's pitch black outside how do you not check your lights are working or the light cluster is even on the trailer

I know there 's a shortage but I really don't know where they are getting some of these people
 
What’s so difficult for them to report the defects? Surely it’s better to deal with any problems in the yard or depot, than having issues on the road?

Buggered if I know. I've been asking them the same question for years....

Sometimes its understandable, like a DAF pinging a low tyre pressure warning on the dash.
Really common and nearly always lying to you so drivers get out and give the relevant tyre a kick and carry on.
On the other hand people ignoring brake pad wear warnings for a week or two isn't uncommon.

Eastern european drivers are terrible for it, if it starts they drive it.
If it dies on the hard shoulder they'll pick up the phone and tell you, but not before. I had one years ago cause £12 grands worth of engine damage by knowingly running it with coolant loss.
 
Buggered if I know. I've been asking them the same question for years....

Sometimes its understandable, like a DAF pinging a low tyre pressure warning on the dash.
Really common and nearly always lying to you so drivers get out and give the relevant tyre a kick and carry on.
On the other hand people ignoring brake pad wear warnings for a week or two isn't uncommon.

Eastern european drivers are terrible for it, if it starts they drive it.
If it dies on the hard shoulder they'll pick up the phone and tell you, but not before. I had one years ago cause £12 grands worth of engine damage by knowingly running it with coolant loss.

Don’t get it. If there’s a problem with your vehicle, ring the company, or breakdown contractor
Why make the problem worse by carrying on driving it? Desperate to finish and go home I suspect...
 
Don’t get it. If there’s a problem with your vehicle, ring the company, or breakdown contractor
Why make the problem worse by carrying on driving it? Desperate to finish and go home I suspect...

Often it revolves around they like a particular vehicle and siimply don't want to use a different one.

We have an old DAF CF 26 tonne fridge, the fridge costs 5 grand a year to maintain, we've had it for years and long since had out money out of it. The tail lift is tempremental and it looks like a proper shed.
I keep it around as a semi-retired spare.

Trouble is that its auto and remapped and a pretty lusty old beast. It runs a little over 400 horsepower and oes like the proverbial off a shovel, Depsite it looking like a chicken coup the old thing is in exceptional mechanical condition

Our drivers start at all times of the day, night trunkers and events driver often work without any tranpsort management on site.

At any available oppurtunity all the Class 2 drivers will take the old shed out in preference to any of the newer vehicles Even if its chucking up a fault or two on the dash. They bitch something chronic if I VOR it for any reason
 
What’s so difficult for them to report the defects? Surely it’s better to deal with any problems in the yard or depot, than having issues on the road?
Transport companies operate in different ways.
Some will have workshops and mechanics on site, others will sub the work out, or call in fitters only if there is a problem.
Others will be large concerns with spare trucks, some won't.
So, here's what happens.
Driver Bloggs works for a small company, no spare trucks or mechanics.
He has a three hour drive to his first drop, and wants to leave early to avoid traffic.
He notices that his oil levels are low.
Driver Bloggs defects his vehicle and waits until it is rectified or a hire truck is sourced.
Driver Smith notices the same thing on his truck, but he wants to get away, and tells himself he'll report it at days end.
Driver Jones works for a company with a workshop, but the chief mechanic is a right gobsh!te who gives it the old
"How the fcuk did you manage to break that, you clumsy tawt?" routine every time somebody causes him work, so Driver Jones is reluctant to report defects.
Driver Ste works for a company with spare vehicles, so defects the truck and moves his gear into another one, and goes about his business.
Everybody is supposed to report defects, but for the reasons stated above, and the ones @jagman2 states, they don't always get reported.
 

stuskimac

Old-Salt
Transport companies operate in different ways.
Some will have workshops and mechanics on site, others will sub the work out, or call in fitters only if there is a problem.
Others will be large concerns with spare trucks, some won't.
So, here's what happens.
Driver Bloggs works for a small company, no spare trucks or mechanics.
He has a three hour drive to his first drop, and wants to leave early to avoid traffic.
He notices that his oil levels are low.
Driver Bloggs defects his vehicle and waits until it is rectified or a hire truck is sourced.
Driver Smith notices the same thing on his truck, but he wants to get away, and tells himself he'll report it at days end.
Driver Jones works for a company with a workshop, but the chief mechanic is a right gobsh!te who gives it the old
"How the fcuk did you manage to break that, you clumsy tawt?" routine every time somebody causes him work, so Driver Jones is reluctant to report defects.
Driver Ste works for a company with spare vehicles, so defects the truck and moves his gear into another one, and goes about his business.
Everybody is supposed to report defects, but for the reasons stated above, and the ones @jagman2 states, they don't always get reported.
Driver bloggs is a busy man !)
 

DarkBrig

War Hero
He's a bit of a knob to be honest.
None of us talk to him.




Gaffers pet.
Why can't driver Bloggs just put some more oil in it himself? - I'm pretty sure every LAD I ever visited had a barrel of OMD 80? in it so you could do that basic job yourself.
Surely someone must be able to create a 5hr PowerPoint lesson for the CPC to cover that.
 
Well that's the three parts of the theory test booked. In February 2022 ffs.
Looking for recommendations for training providers in the Warwickshire area fellas.
Anyone know of any reason as to why I shouldn't consider George Lovatt Training in Coleshill?
I don’t know them as I train HGV drivers in S Wales. But points to look for: do they have a properly set up reversing area, not a roughed out piece of waste ground? Do their trucks look presentable? Is your instructor actually qualified rather than a driver with a sideline?
 
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