UK Transport Crisis?

Well I was honest at the interview and said I had t drive a hgv since leaving the mob.
I’ll have to be trained on the vehicle and loading and unloading and the job in general.


It pays to do that.
Over the years I've employed several newly qualified and inexperienced drivers. Rarely have a I regretted it
 
I said in the interview I work as a bus driver but looking at using my hgv licence for a new opportunity, and that I got my hgv licence in the army.
Pretty informal to be honest, although I wore a shirt and tie to look presentable.The interviewing manager asked at the end if I could pop in over the weekend and do an assessment drive.
The assessment drive was done by one of the supervisors, I basically jumped in the cab, put my card in and drove around for almost an hour. Automatic and not particularly difficult, even though I hadn’t touched a truck in years. I think my years as a bus driver obviously helped.
 
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ste14w

MIA
I said in the interview I work as a bus driver but looking at using my hgv licence for a new opportunity, and that I got my hgv licence in the army.
Pretty informal to be honest, although I wore a shirt and tie to look presentable.The interviewing manager asked at the end if I could pop in over the weekend and do an assessment drive.
The assessment drive was done by one of the supervisors, I basically jumped in the cab, put my card in and drove around for almost an hour. Automatic and not particularly difficult, even though I hadn’t touched a truck in years. I think my years as a bus driver obviously helped.
You'll be fine.
Take in the advice on here regarding tacho breaks, and after you've been shown the routine you'll be out there on your own, but never be afraid to ask for advice.
Most drivers will be glad to help.
Every single one of us went through the 'sweating like a Scouser in a job centre' moment when we first started learning to reverse in front of an audience, worried we'd miss the bay or hit a wall.
After a few weeks you'll be a lot more confident, know the equipment better and you will start to enjoy your new job, and hopefully better pay rates.
 
To any hgv drivers, are you expected to have much mechanical knowledgeable? Mine is zero.
On the buses, if we have a defect/ problem we simply report it. We don’t do any repairs, we just phone up and say what we see.
 

kieren21

Clanker
To any hgv drivers, are you expected to have much mechanical knowledgeable? Mine is zero.
On the buses, if we have a defect/ problem we simply report it. We don’t do any repairs, we just phone up and say what we see.
I’ve got pretty much zero mechanical aptitude.

There’s been times where it might have helped but it’s never proven to be a massive hindrance and most large firms nowadays won’t let you even change a bulb.
 
I’ve got pretty much zero mechanical aptitude.

There’s been times where it might have helped but it’s never proven to be a massive hindrance and most large firms nowadays won’t let you even change a bulb.

When I did my PCV ( bus training) we got taught to check the dipstick, check the screenwash bottle, open the bonnet.
Then at the bus depot driving service buses, we got told told to not even open the bonnet, let alone touch the dipstick.
Partly down to drivers making errors.One driver putting adblue into the engine coolant chamber, thus causing a lot of work afterwards for the engineers, after damaging the bus..
 

jinxy

LE
When I did my PCV ( bus training) we got taught to check the dipstick, check the screenwash bottle, open the bonnet.
Then at the bus depot driving service buses, we got told told to not even open the bonnet, let alone touch the dipstick.
Partly down to drivers making errors.One driver putting adblue into the engine coolant chamber, thus causing a lot of work afterwards for the engineers, after damaging the bus..
You'd have needed to open the bonnet first you bluffing coont
 
You'd have needed to open the bonnet first you bluffing coont

What you talking about? On the a bus often the engine coolant reservoir is on the side, by the back. Someone ( a driver) put adblue in there instead of the diesel reservoir. They are next to each other. The engine is at the back of the bus.
The screen wash at the front.

My point is we are not allowed to touch anything mechanical with the bus, nothing at all, anymore.
 

Truxx

LE
To any hgv drivers, are you expected to have much mechanical knowledgeable? Mine is zero.
On the buses, if we have a defect/ problem we simply report it. We don’t do any repairs, we just phone up and say what we see.
I brought a load down from Scotland a while back. Had a blowout on the M74 but as it was on one of the back twins I quietly trundled into the services parked up and changed it.

"Fcuk me" said the old boy parked next to me "long time since I saw anyone do that"
 
What you talking about? On the a bus often the engine coolant reservoir is on the side, by the back. Someone ( a driver) put adblue in there instead of the diesel reservoir. They are next to each other. The engine is at the back of the bus.
The screen wash at the front.

My point is we are not allowed to touch anything mechanical with the bus, nothing at all, anymore.

All clearly labelled, and they can still get it wrong!
 
To any hgv drivers, are you expected to have much mechanical knowledgeable? Mine is zero.
On the buses, if we have a defect/ problem we simply report it. We don’t do any repairs, we just phone up and say what we see.

Yes and no

I wouldn’t expect you to be able to fix anything beyond changing a bulb or topping up your screenwash

I would absolutely expect you to be capable of basic mechanical checks like oil and coolant levels and doing thorough daily checks

I'm also a bit evangelical when it comes to drivers reporting defects or dash warnings
If I find a bald tyre (and I do) it's a one shot warning, next one goes to disciplinary

Drivers have every right to expect to be handed the keys to a roadworthy vehicle
I have every right to expect them to report defects and take reasonable care of the vehicle for their part

Not meant to sound draconian but I firmly expect drivers to play their part in maintaining roadworthiness and safety

It's really common for experienced drivers coming in to the company to be really bad at defect reporting , not because they don't see the defect but that they often come from from place were defect reports are routinely ignored
 
To any hgv drivers, are you expected to have much mechanical knowledgeable? Mine is zero.
On the buses, if we have a defect/ problem we simply report it. We don’t do any repairs, we just phone up and say what we see.
I once drove for a boss who, although mad keen on servicing, was loathe to call out a repair crew if the wagon could make it home.
His favourite saying was " let it develop".
So there I am, Friday afternoon, fully laden but only about 20 miles from base and a long weekend off, when there's an ominous rattle below the cab. I pulled in, due a 15 min break anyway, and called it in.
"Let it develop" says he.
15 minutes break over, I pull out, and there's a loud bang, some smaller bangs, hisses, frizzling, and assorted bits in the road. I call the boss :" it's developed" says I, " the fan bearing's blown, the fan's sheared off and gone through the radiator and intercooler, and the front grille, and it's chopped whatever hoses and cables were in the way."
 

Truxx

LE
I once drove for a boss who, although mad keen on servicing, was loathe to call out a repair crew if the wagon could make it home.
His favourite saying was " let it develop".
So there I am, Friday afternoon, fully laden but only about 20 miles from base and a long weekend off, when there's an ominous rattle below the cab. I pulled in, due a 15 min break anyway, and called it in.
"Let it develop" says he.
15 minutes break over, I pull out, and there's a loud bang, some smaller bangs, hisses, frizzling, and assorted bits in the road. I call the boss :" it's developed" says I, " the fan bearing's blown, the fan's sheared off and gone through the radiator and intercooler, and the front grille, and it's chopped whatever hoses and cables were in the way."
The decision was made.

It was 1978 and B troop were fed up with 16 ER 36

Or "damien" as it rapidly became known as soon as the Omen film came out.

It was a Mk1AEC with a reputation for being the least reliable of a very unreliable bunch of trucks.

It would be killed.

So a couple of likely coves were volunteered to kill it. All the oil was drained and put in a couple of cans which were thrown on the back.

It was then driven, with a vengance, out of barracks and, eventually onto the "spaghetti junction" just north of Duisburg.

It actually made a couple of circuits before inevitably coming to a very noisy and very smelly and very sudden halt.

At which point the crew poured all the oil back into the smoking engine, chucked the empty tins down the embankment to hide the evidence and called REME duty recovery

"Engine siezed" they said when the wrecker arrived.

Up jumps the Reem into the cab, flicks the starter at which Damien bursts back into life.

I dont think that they make them like that any more.
 

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