UK Transport Crisis?

That's why I expressed an interest.

I imagine it could be variable width tracks, on each individual axle, with the wheels moving in-and-out . . . but, that sounds like a recipe for disaster, no matter of how many safety features, locking-pins, are incorporated.

Or, more probably, two different axles (with different track-widths), suspended at either end of the wagon, the appropriate one being lowered to accommodate whichever track width it was running over.

More important was . . . did/do, the Russians (now) have a quantity of rail wagons with such equipment, which would enable them to venture further west, than we all previously imagined?!

If I find the @kinross_special “nocturnal” video, I will post a link
I assume that there are a number of different methods, but here is one of them

 
Spain does have some standard gauge - maybe there is a main route for freight? ISTR an old system of jacking up whole trains and changing the bogies, which sounds like a proper PITA . . .

Pretty certain that "an old system of jacking up whole trains and changing the bogies", was common place between the USSR, and the rest of the (then) "Easter bloc".
 
RTE

Rail Transfer Equipment. Built by Klaus. There was also a flat rack version SRTE but that could only lift a box onto itself drive away from the train then offload it onto a normal DROPS.

The whole set up looked a bit clunky, but worked a treat and half a dozen blokes could unload a train in a couple of hours.

The downside, of course, was that stuff was in containers, and you still had to break bulk. Plus the depots were just not set up to handle containers.

Found it too . . .

250px-Sidelifter_in_forest.jpg


But, again, it only seems to be a lift on/lift off, arrangement - with no swinging-through from one-side-to-the other, which is definitely what I remember :( .


EDIT: plus more from here . . .

Ekalift-container-handling-trailer-32992_16.jpg


 
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That's why I expressed an interest.

I imagine it could be variable width tracks, on each individual axle, with the wheels moving in-and-out . . . but, that sounds like a recipe for disaster, no matter of how many safety features, locking-pins, are incorporated.

Or, more probably, two different axles (with different track-widths), suspended at either end of the wagon, the appropriate one being lowered to accommodate whichever track width it was running over.

More important was . . . did/do, the Russians (now) have a quantity of rail wagons with such equipment, which would enable them to venture further west, than we all previously imagined?!

If I find the @kinross_special “nocturnal” video, I will post a link

Trains carrying fruit and vegetables from Southern Spain to Denmark have been operating for a few years. There is just one stop, at Cologne, to change trains. They are also used from Valencia to the Nordic countries and Poland.

Also Stobarts announce a train from Southern Spain carrying the same stuff all the way to Widnes where they will transported onward by the company. That was back in 2009 and still runs weekly.

EuroWeekly News reported, about 18 months ago, that extra trains had been operating from Murcia to UK so it has been done for quite some time.

And Tesco started bringing fresh goods by train from Spain back in September as reported in Wales Online.

Any track gauge problems have obviously been overcome and the articles say the journey from leaving S Spain to arrival in UK is 72 hours.
 
That's why I expressed an interest.

I imagine it could be variable width tracks, on each individual axle, with the wheels moving in-and-out . . . but, that sounds like a recipe for disaster, no matter of how many safety features, locking-pins, are incorporated.

Or, more probably, two different axles (with different track-widths), suspended at either end of the wagon, the appropriate one being lowered to accommodate whichever track width it was running over.....

Can't remember an example, but I think this was tried with street tramways in the early 1900's. The usual British thing where neighbouring towns couldn't get their act together and use the same gauge from day one. These used a sliding wheel on the axle, and weren't a great success.
 

Truxx

LE
Trains carrying fruit and vegetables from Southern Spain to Denmark have been operating for a few years. There is just one stop, at Cologne, to change trains. They are also used from Valencia to the Nordic countries and Poland.

Also Stobarts announce a train from Southern Spain carrying the same stuff all the way to Widnes where they will transported onward by the company. That was back in 2009 and still runs weekly.

EuroWeekly News reported, about 18 months ago, that extra trains had been operating from Murcia to UK so it has been done for quite some time.

And Tesco started bringing fresh goods by train from Spain back in September as reported in Wales Online.

Any track gauge problems have obviously been overcome and the articles say the journey from leaving S Spain to arrival in UK is 72 hours.
Almeria-London by truck - 47 hours

Sea passage Bilbao- UK somewhere between 18 and 40 hours.
 

Truxx

LE
Found it too . . .

250px-Sidelifter_in_forest.jpg


But, again, it only seems to be a lift on/lift off, arrangement - with no swinging-through from one-side-to-the other, which is definitely what I remember :( .


EDIT: plus more from here . . .

Ekalift-container-handling-trailer-32992_16.jpg


RTE and SRTE
R.jpg
R (1).jpg
 

Truxx

LE
Blue Ford oval and white fog lamp covers? In fact, Mickey Mouse add-on fog lamps on a military truck?

@Bubbles_Barker - have a lie down :)
That was the 38 Tonner that I talked about earlier - it was the best of the bunch |Volvo and Renault were the others in the competition) and had that daycab - which the others didnt. As a result it had decent resale value, so as well as being the best performer it had the lowest whole-life costs.
 
That was the 38 Tonner that I talked about earlier - it was the best of the bunch |Volvo and Renault were the others in the competition) and had that daycab - which the others didnt. As a result it had decent resale value, so as well as being the best performer it had the lowest whole-life costs.

Perhaps so, but it looks fvcking ridiculous with Halfords fog lamps :)
 
Who pays for the locomotive fuel, and maitenance of the loco, waggons, railway, signals et al?
That's a big saving on the trucks, but one way or another the end customer will pay for it.
The trick would be rip up the rails and put roads in . Trains use too much failing infrastructure in a small crowded country .
 
I start my hgv job on Monday after doing bus driving. Haven’t drove a HGV since 2010, in the Army. Apart from a recent assessment drive.
Ive got myself a digital tachograph card, I’ve never used any type of tachograph!
Just trying to learn some basics on YouTube !
 
I start my hgv job on Monday after doing bus driving. Haven’t drove a HGV since 2010, in the Army. Apart from a recent assessment drive.
Ive got myself a digital tachograph card, I’ve never used any type of tachograph!
Just trying to learn some basics on YouTube !


Digital tacho's are easy Roger Out, they do most of the hard work for you including when to take breaks
Working time directive is the one that will catch you out. Remember that regardless of driving hours you must take 15 minutes after 6 hours work of any kind.

When you take a break make sure you are on bed, not other work, thats a really common error

You have the h symbol which is bed (rest) O with a dot in the middle which is driving and crossed hammers which is other work.
Always put our card in slot 1 (unless you are non drving 2nd man) and use the number 1 button to cycle through the category

If in doubt, ask another driver, even the most hairy arsed truck driver is usually happy to help and sitting on the dock its common for drivers to ask each other advice and very few begrudge it

Above all that, I have driver of 40 years plus who still **** up their tachograph, don't worry yourself to much.
When you get it wroing your boss will debrief you from the download, its no big deal and everybody makes mistakes.
Never remove your card and driver, if you avoid that you'll be alright

Good luck, you might have a hard few days but you'll start enjoying it pretty quickly, especially when you notice the cargo doesn't try to talk to you
 

Bubbles_Barker

LE
Book Reviewer
Digital tacho's are easy Roger Out, they do most of the hard work for you including when to take breaks
Working time directive is the one that will catch you out. Remember that regardless of driving hours you must take 15 minutes after 6 hours work of any kind.

When you take a break make sure you are on bed, not other work, thats a really common error

You have the h symbol which is bed (rest) O with a dot in the middle which is driving and crossed hammers which is other work.
Always put our card in slot 1 (unless you are non drving 2nd man) and use the number 1 button to cycle through the category

If in doubt, ask another driver, even the most hairy arsed truck driver is usually happy to help and sitting on the dock its common for drivers to ask each other advice and very few begrudge it

Above all that, I have driver of 40 years plus who still **** up their tachograph, don't worry yourself to much.
When you get it wroing your boss will debrief you from the download, its no big deal and everybody makes mistakes.
Never remove your card and driver, if you avoid that you'll be alright

Good luck, you might have a hard few days but you'll start enjoying it pretty quickly, especially when you notice the cargo doesn't try to talk to you

Cheers. What does period of availability mean? Surely, if your not driving, or on a break, it’s other work? What the point in that symbol?
Also for example, could you do other work for say 45 minutes, then drive for 4.5 hours straight through without a break?
 
Cheers. What does period of availability mean? Surely, if your not driving, or on a break, it’s other work? What the point in that symbol?
Also for example, could you do other work for say 45 minutes, then drive for 4.5 hours straight through without a break?

Period of availability is effectively waiting time when you are on call and need to be available.
You aren't actually working but you are available to do so. Personally I never use it. I'm either driving, doing other work or on rest.
Typically you would use it twiddling your thumbs on a loading dock or similar and when you are 2nd man

2nd point, yes you could as you wouldn't be breaking the 6 hours working time directive and you are obliged to take 45 minutes break after a maximum of 4.5 hours driving.
Need to be careful about that though, if you did it the other way round and drive 4.5 hours then 45 minutes other work then break you are going to get busted!
 
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