UK to purchase 2 Littoral Strike Ships

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Is that what the MOD want or just what that company is proposing ?
What the company are angling for. Good pitch from them, it cuts back on the need for RN/RFA bods desperately needed elsewhere. Whether we run with that I dunno.
 
Published by: Xavier Vavasseur, NAVAL NEWS, on 02 Jul 2020.

First Four US Navy Littoral Combat Ships Set to be Mothballed.

The U.S. Navy is looking to decommission 8 vessels in 2021. Pending approval from Congress, the plan would see the first four Littoral Combat Ships (LCS) being mothballed.


The information surfaced in a June 20 message from the chief of naval operations (CNO). Littoral combat ships USS Freedom (LCS 1), USS Independence (LCS 2), USS Fort Worth (LCS 3) and USS Coronado (LCS 4) will all be placed “Out of Commission In Reserve” (OCIR) on 31 March 2021 along with Whidbey Island-class dock landing ship USS Fort McHenry (LSD 43).

The CNO statement reads:
To facilitate fleet planning efforts to conduct decommissioning
continuous maintenance availability (CMAV) or inactivation availability
(INAC), the projected schedule for inactivating U.S. battle force and non
battle force naval vessels in FY21 is promulgated as follows:

Ship Name Proj Inactive Date Post Inactive Status
USS ZEPHYR 31 Mar 2021 Dismantle
(PC-8 )
USS SHAMAL 31 Mar 2021 Dismantle
(PC 13)
USS TORNADO 31 Mar 2021 Dismantle
(PC 14)
USNS SIOUX 30 Sep 2021 Dismantle
(T-ATF 171)
USS FORT MCHENRY 31 Mar 2021 OCIR
(LSD 43)
USS FREEDOM 31 Mar 2021 OCIR
(LCS 1)
USS INDEPENDENCE 31 Mar 2021 OCIR
(LCS 2)

USS FORT WORTH 31 Mar 2021 OCIR
(LCS 3)
USS CORONADO 31 Mar 2021 OCIR
This is a surprising development as all four LCS are fairly new vessels, having been commissioned between October 2008 and April 2014. In addition, the announcement follows the delivery of USS Oakland (LCS 24) last week, which brought the number of ships in the US Navy inventory up to 300 (edging closer to President Trump’s wish to see the number grow to 355 ships by 2030).

As reported by Defense News, citing a Navy official, the first four LCS were more prototypes / test vessels than true warships: “they’re not configured like the other LCS in the fleet, and they need significant upgrades. Everything from combat [systems], to structural, you name it. They’re expensive to upgrade.”

[photo] SAN DIEGO (May 2, 2012) The first of class littoral combat ships USS Freedom (LCS 1), left, and USS Independence (LCS 2), maneuver together during an exercise off the coast of Southern California. The littoral combat ship is a fast, agile, networked surface combatant designed to operate in the near-shore environment, while capable of open-ocean tasking, and win against 21st-century coastal threats such as submarines, mines, and swarming small craft. (U.S. Navy photo by Lt. Jan Shultis/Released)

1593783422135.png


 
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Reference the above . . . .

USS Freedom (LCS-1)

USS Freedom (LCS-1) is the lead ship of the Freedom class of littoral combat ships (LCS). She is the third vessel of the United States Navy to be so named after the concept of freedom. She is the design competitor produced by the Lockheed Martin consortium, in competition with the General Dynamics–designed USS Independence. She was officially accepted by the Supervisor of Shipbuilding Gulf Coast on behalf of the US Navy from the Lockheed Martin/Marinette Marine/Gibbs and Cox team in Marinette, Wisconsin on 18 September 2008.[8]

She is designed for a variety of missions in shallow waters, minesweeping and humanitarian relief, capable against submarines and small ships, but not designed to take on large warships. The ship is a semi-planing monohull design capable of over 40 knots (74 km/h; 46 mph).[9]

Commissioned in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on 8 November 2008, USS Freedom is home-ported in San Diego,[1] and assigned to Littoral Combat Ship Squadron One.[10]

1593789264536.png



 
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Again . . . also, reference the above . . . .

Independence-class littoral combat ship

The Independence class is a class of littoral combat ships built for the United States Navy.

The hull design evolved from a project at Austal to design a high speed, 40 knot cruise ship. That hull design evolved into the high-speed trimaran ferry HSC Benchijigua Express and the Independence class was then proposed by General Dynamics and Austal as a contender for Navy plans to build a fleet of small, multipurpose warships to operate in the littoral zone. Two ships were approved, to compete with Lockheed Martin's Freedom-class design.

Despite initial plans to only build ships of the winner out of the two competing Independence or Freedom classes . . . . .

. . . . .
in 2010 the Navy announced plans to order up to ten additional ships of each class, for a total 12 ships per class.[15] In March 2016 the Navy announced their intention to order an additional two ships, increasing the order to 13 ships of each class.[16]

It was announced in early September 2016 that the first four vessels of the LCS program would be used as test ships rather than being deployed with the fleet.[17][18] This includes lead ship Independence and Coronado. As of May 2019, nine ships have been commissioned. In February 2020 it was announced that the Navy plans to retire the first four LCS ships.[19]

1593790036654.png


 
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[DRIFT]

RV Triton

The Research Vessel Triton is a trimaran vessel owned by Gardline Marine Sciences Limited and a former prototype British warship demonstrator for the UK's Defence Evaluation and Research Agency (later QinetiQ).

She was built as a technology demonstrator ship for the Royal Navy's Future Surface Combatant, and has been used to both prove the viability of the hull-form and as a trials platform for other QinetiQ innovations.[4] The ship was used by the Australian Border Force's Marine Unit, and was for a time moored in the River Fal near the King Harry chain ferry. Up until July 2019 she was moored on the River Yare, Great Yarmouth in Norfolk, England.[5]

1593790673899.png



+ + + + + + + + + + + + +

Mr. Hancock: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the cost was of producing the RV 'Trinton'; when she will begin sea trials; when she will be put into service; what her mission will be; and if he will make a statement. [115745]

Dr. Moonie: RV 'Triton' is currently being built by Vosper Thorneycroft at Southampton. The cost of the ship is approximately £13.5 million, which is being funded by the Defence Evaluation and Research Agency (DERA).

RV 'Triton' will start contractor sea trials in July of this year and will be delivered later in the autumn to begin two years of sea trials to evaluate the hullform as a contender for future warship designs. On completion of the first two years' trials, the ship's role will be as a trials facility to test and evaluate at sea many different equipments and systems, either commercial or military. As a trials platform, RV 'Triton' will be owned by DERA and will not 'enter service' with the Royal Navy in the military use of the phase.


[/DRIFT]
 
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Yokel

LE
Published by: Xavier Vavasseur, NAVAL NEWS, on 02 Jul 2020.

First Four US Navy Littoral Combat Ships Set to be Mothballed.

The U.S. Navy is looking to decommission 8 vessels in 2021. Pending approval from Congress, the plan would see the first four Littoral Combat Ships (LCS) being mothballed.


The information surfaced in a June 20 message from the chief of naval operations (CNO). Littoral combat ships USS Freedom (LCS 1), USS Independence (LCS 2), USS Fort Worth (LCS 3) and USS Coronado (LCS 4) will all be placed “Out of Commission In Reserve” (OCIR) on 31 March 2021 along with Whidbey Island-class dock landing ship USS Fort McHenry (LSD 43).

The CNO statement reads:
To facilitate fleet planning efforts to conduct decommissioning
continuous maintenance availability (CMAV) or inactivation availability
(INAC), the projected schedule for inactivating U.S. battle force and non
battle force naval vessels in FY21 is promulgated as follows:



This is a surprising development as all four LCS are fairly new vessels, having been commissioned between October 2008 and April 2014. In addition, the announcement follows the delivery of USS Oakland (LCS 24) last week, which brought the number of ships in the US Navy inventory up to 300 (edging closer to President Trump’s wish to see the number grow to 355 ships by 2030).

As reported by Defense News, citing a Navy official, the first four LCS were more prototypes / test vessels than true warships: “they’re not configured like the other LCS in the fleet, and they need significant upgrades. Everything from combat [systems], to structural, you name it. They’re expensive to upgrade.”

[photo] SAN DIEGO (May 2, 2012) The first of class littoral combat ships USS Freedom (LCS 1), left, and USS Independence (LCS 2), maneuver together during an exercise off the coast of Southern California. The littoral combat ship is a fast, agile, networked surface combatant designed to operate in the near-shore environment, while capable of open-ocean tasking, and win against 21st-century coastal threats such as submarines, mines, and swarming small craft. (U.S. Navy photo by Lt. Jan Shultis/Released)

View attachment 486836

Placed in the wrong thread - maybe!

The Littoral Combat Ship was an attempt by the Americans to replace fully tooled up frigates, and Mine Counter Measures Vessels, with a multi purpose hull fitted with mission modules for various missions - such as ASW or MCM. Integration has been a problem, as has the return to deep water operations in both the Atlantic and Pacific and the possibility of peer level threats.

The Littoral Strike Ship is the proposal to use what appears to be a mercantile design to forward deploy with embarked Bootnecks or SF, and some helicopters and watercraft, without the expense and complexity of a proper LPD.
 
Is the decommissioning that much of a surprise? Is it not the case that the LCSs are a bit shīt?
Not necessarily, they were designed for the littorals, not the middle of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. I wonder if the might be attractive to Poland or the Baltic States as a Foreign Military Sale?
 
The Little Crappy Ship

next stop, USCG
 
Not necessarily, they were designed for the littorals, not the middle of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. I wonder if the might be attractive to Poland or the Baltic States as a Foreign Military Sale?
They are a pair of strange looking things (all of them, in each/both class) !!

1593817571686.png
 
They are a pair of strange looking things (all of them, in each/both class) !!

View attachment 486924

The Bright idea was they were cheap and expendable - unsurprisingly, the people expected to go to war in them were not enamoured of the expendable bit.
The LCS version on the right is nothing more than an armed Austal car ferry
 

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