Discussion in 'Weapons, Equipment & Rations' started by babiesarm, Sep 11, 2003.

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  1. Does anyone know the answer to the following??

    I would like to apply for a shotgun licence.

    I do not have a gun or anywhere to store one, (yet) can I still go ahead and apply for the licence??

    Basically I will be going on a shoot in October and will probably end up borowing someone elses gun, so will need a licence.

    Thank you

  2. Yes you can apply. But if the owner of the gun is going to the same shoot in Oct, you can legally use his gun under his direct supervision, without a licence. Ne applications are now (i think) £50 so its a bit steep for one shoot.
  3. Thank you Packard,

    I do intend eventually to get my own gun also have a couple more shoots in Nov and Dec so 50 quid would be worth it.
  4. msr

    msr LE

  5. Mr Happy

    Mr Happy LE Moderator

    a chum applied for a shotgun licence in S.London and was duly visited by the firearms police officer for an inspection (you have to get the storage kit before the licence - basically a bolted to the floor gun cabinet/safe is all that is required). The civpol chap then had to do a follow up visit for a renewal sometime and as he was the only person who'd applied for a shotgun licence in years in that part of London the civpol chappy just conducted a telephone interview (box still there, yes, good - bye!). :lol:
  6. If you get permission you can store your shotgun in a military armoury. The police just need a letter from the CO or a coy comd will usually do. It is much cheaper and easier then a secure cabinet and perfectly legal.
  7. Apply for a firearms licence at the same time and it is much cheaper than applying for two separately. It is only slightly more expensive and gives you the flexibility to buy a rifle or a larger amount of ammo.
  8. Gun cabinets should be bolted to an exterior wall with monster Rawlbolts. However the Firearms Officers have differing views depending on which constabulary you'd be registered with. In some cases you can escape with just a secure clamp to fix the gun to a wall. In fact in Norfolk they just check if there is a cabinet at all - you could Blu-tack the box to the wall and it would have passed inspection. Most people get caught out on storing shotguns in cars when going to shoots: leaving guns and cartridges unattended in the back of your wagon at a petrol station usually ends in tears.

    It all gets considerably more stringent should you apply for a Firearms certificate - then the police will really grill you on storage, ammunition allowances etc.

    Have a look at for any advice and possible bargains in terms of sourcing storage equipment. Oh yes, and subscribe to the British Assoc for Shooting and Conservation (BASC), which will cover you in case you accidentally shoot a peasant, or blow your own foot off.
  9. its easy to get a shotgun in norfolk as long as you remember the bag limit for theving gypo scum is Two :twisted:
  10. Yep, and that's only the reported cases of pikey shooting. In fact if you shoot two pikeys, and have a couple of years free for a spell in clink, the Press will pay you £125,000 for the pleasure - certainly beats the £8k/year EU farming subsidy Tony Martin was getting.
  11. thats a bargin for the Taxpayer just think how much benefits and legal aid was saved pity the other toerag was'nt put Down too. Theiving off a known nutter cause of death suicide :evil:
  12. Babiesarm, another consideration for when you apply for yer certificate is home security. Inspecting officers will probably have a snoop around your place to check how easy it is to burgle: door/window locks, patio doors etc. A couple of people I know had their certificate withheld 'till they tightened their drum up a bit.
  13. Don't kick the arse out of the amount of weapons and the calibre that choose.

    They aren't going to look favourably at a bloke living in Milton Keynes want seven 7.62 hunting rifles.

    Limit you application to three weapons, and saves variation fees for adding additional weapons later. Vary the calibres, and on the info page where it asks where the weapon will be used, state: any mod approved range, as when my local gun club closed they automatically revoked a number of tickets stating that because thier nominated range had closed there was no need to continue to hold weapons.

    A tip for security, the Police loved and gave me brownie points for the PIR pointed directly at the safe.

    A normal ticket application in Lancashire takes around four weeks.
  14. Babiesarm is only applying for a bog-standard Shotgun Certificate (SGC). You don't, unlike applying for a Firearms Cert (FAC), even have to own any weapons to hold one. That gives you free reign to borrow guns from friends albeit for no more than 72 hours. Few people use shotguns that are covered by the more stringent FAC, and those people that do have to work very hard to justify their reasons - 9-shot semi automatics aren't usually owned by normal people. Acquiring and registering shotguns is also very simple with an SGC - cheaper and less paperwork.

    The definitive book on shotguns and other firearms (even rail-launched missiles and flamethrowers) is the "Home Office Guidance to The Police on Firearms", available from HMSO. It's the Firearms Act for non-lawyers and covers lots of rules about military armouries, and 'reasonable grounds' for owning and using weapons.
  15. If you only want a shotgun dont go to the hassle of an FAC.

    You need far more reasons for an FAC such as where you shoot, club memberships, etc. Alot is down to where you live. If you live in the country there is a perseption that you are more likely to need as fire arm of some sort.

    Get the guide mentioned above as it is realy handy if the Civpol try to make up there own rules, Hampshire and Avon & Somerset are great for that.