UK Sergeant stranded in Kenya-UK row over death.

#3
The article says that a civilian was shot. It also says the base is used to prepare troops for Afghanistan.

It's nice to see the training is authentic.
 
#4
The article says that a civilian was shot. It also says the base is used to prepare troops for Afghanistan.

It's nice to see the training is authentic.
Well we've definately moved on from covering hexy blocks in jam / chocolate and giving them to the kids to eat
 
#5
Strange when you remember that when my Dad was in Kenya killing people, they wanted him out of the country as quickly as possible!
 
#6
Strange when you remember that when my Dad was in Kenya killing people, they wanted him out of the country as quickly as possible!
Jomo Kenyatta walt.
 
#7
I know the bloke in question and he is a top soldier! Also from what I heard, the group were poachers and deserved what they got. It's unfortunate that kenyans have a shoot to kill policy on poachers yet they wont let trained soldiers in the area help with the problem!
Hopefully it's just political wrangling and they'll let him go back to the UK soon.

It might be a case of "Out of the frying pan, into the fire" though. I'd advise your friend to get himself a solicitor in preparation for any legal proceedings that will take place under UK jurisdiction.
 
#9
Bet our favourite Human Rights lawyer will be there to slap a lawsuit on this bloke as soon as he steps off the plane. Will probably claimed he raped him before shooting him too! I suppose the guy who died was only armed to protect himself from the nasty Imperialist Oppressors????
 
#10
Well we've definately moved on from covering hexy blocks in jam / chocolate and giving them to the kids to eat
Why waste choc un jam on army Kendal Cakes the kids in Kuwait in 90s loved them.
 
#11
I reckon this will bother him for quite a long time so he'll want to get a lawyer asap if he hasnt done so already. I also wonder where he is being held and in what condition

Sent from my GT-S5830 using ARRSE mobile app
The article states that he's on the British base so he's most likely confined to camp. I bet he's bored out of his skull.
 
#12
The Kenyan authorities are incapable of policing their own backyards and this sort of thing is the fallout. Good luck to the bloke as it could of been a sadder story if the poachers had got the drop on him. 1PARA circa 2001 had a young tom casevaced out the country for surgery after nearly losing his life to poachers and I'm sure other units could tell similar stories.

If push comes to shove then Kenya isn't irreplaceable as a training area. I'm sure we could arrange similar training establishments somewhere on the African continent or failing that, use the funds to revamp the skeleton crewed facilities in Belize.
 
#13
#14
“Stranded” when did the BBC start to resort to sensationalism journalism?

He’s on a British base. Does this mean that everyone on tour is stranded?

He’s prevented from leaving the country pending a police investigation and subsequent judicial proceeding…..the exact same thing that would happen to a foreign national here.
 
#15
i was in kenya sept last year and pretty much everyone is confined to camp now anyways

after the prozzie septic tank icident... so he's most prob chillin by the pool in NSG or nairobi
 
#16
Complete aside, Col Mark Christie...if its the same one I'm thinking of, I remember joining Battalion as a young officer, good bloke.

....carry on
 
#17
“Stranded” when did the BBC start to resort to sensationalism journalism?

He’s on a British base. Does this mean that everyone on tour is stranded?

He’s prevented from leaving the country pending a police investigation and subsequent judicial proceeding…..the exact same thing that would happen to a foreign national here.
He's part of the British military contingent and from what I have read, there is a memorandum of understanding that any problems with British troops will be dealt with through the military process! That's not an unusual arrangement.

He can't leave the country and hasn't been able to for several months. I'd use the term stranded. That's a reasonable description of his situation.

A bunch of armed locals roaming around a military training area which is in an area where the writ of law doesn't necessarily work and there is a problem with equipment being stolen?

It doesn't take a genius to work out that there could be problems of this nature and that's why it's important that our troops can carry out their duties without fear of being locked up for an indeterminate amount of time in a Kenyan jail.

I'm sure that if there was any wrongdoing on the Sargeants part, the British military authorities would take the appropriate action.
 
#18
Extract from the Kenya Gov. Link = National Assembly 2012-08-16: 14:30 :: Mzalendo


"David Musila (The Assistant Minister, Ministry of State for Defence)

Mr. Speaker, Sir, I beg to reply. (a) According to the Memorandum of Understanding between the Government of the Republic of Kenya and the British Government, British troops conduct training within the areas allocated to the Kenyan Defence Forces (KDF) in Archers Post and Lolkanjau area. According to the statement by the British Army on 10th June, 2012, the British Military were conducting range clearance exercise in the general area of Lolkanjau (Ref. No.670987) with both the ground and aerial teams conducting clearance prior to commencing the live firing training. Mr. Speaker, Sir, the ground troops and aerial teams were mopping up the area with a view to clear the area of any human presence and animals. While conducting aerial surveillance, the British air crew sighted a group of six morans on the training area and they alerted the ground troops. Among the six, one was armed while the others were unarmed. The armed man, who turned out to be Mr. Tilam Leresh, ran towards the troops and after being given a warning signal to stop and surrender, he instead threatened to shoot by aiming the rifle at the soldiers. At this point, the British soldiers shot Mr. Leresh. Thereafter, they conducted first aid to the victim but in the process, he succumbed to the injuries. A G3 rifle and three loaded magazines were retrieved from the deceased. The soldier who shot the deceased is Sgt. Madison George at Archers Post training area. That is the information we have. b) The body of the deceased is still at the Isiolo District Hospital mortuary. The postmortem was performed jointly by the Kenyan and the British pathologists, Dr. Kiluva of Isiolo Hospital, on 12th June between 9.00 hours and 1.00 hours, in which it was established that the deceased succumbed to severe haemorrhage from penetrative chest injury as a result of the bullet injury. (c) Sgt. Madison was arrested by the British military police and is still held at Nanyuki Barracks awaiting prosecution. The case is being handled at this point by the Kenya police and the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP). According to Section 6 of the Memorandum of Understanding between the Government of Kenya and the United Kingdom, the Kenyan authorities have the primary right to exercise jurisdiction with respect to alleged offences committed in Kenya and punishable by Kenya laws. I wish, therefore, to take this opportunity to warn all members of the visiting forces, including members of the British Army training in Kenya, that the Government of Kenya will deal firmly with any members who breaks the laws of this country.
 
#19
Extract from the Kenya Gov. Link = National Assembly 2012-08-16: 14:30 :: Mzalendo


"David Musila (The Assistant Minister, Ministry of State for Defence)

Mr. Speaker, Sir, I beg to reply. (a) According to the Memorandum of Understanding between the Government of the Republic of Kenya and the British Government, British troops conduct training within the areas allocated to the Kenyan Defence Forces (KDF) in Archers Post and Lolkanjau area. According to the statement by the British Army on 10th June, 2012, the British Military were conducting range clearance exercise in the general area of Lolkanjau (Ref. No.670987) with both the ground and aerial teams conducting clearance prior to commencing the live firing training. Mr. Speaker, Sir, the ground troops and aerial teams were mopping up the area with a view to clear the area of any human presence and animals. While conducting aerial surveillance, the British air crew sighted a group of six morans on the training area and they alerted the ground troops. Among the six, one was armed while the others were unarmed. The armed man, who turned out to be Mr. Tilam Leresh, ran towards the troops and after being given a warning signal to stop and surrender, he instead threatened to shoot by aiming the rifle at the soldiers. At this point, the British soldiers shot Mr. Leresh. Thereafter, they conducted first aid to the victim but in the process, he succumbed to the injuries. A G3 rifle and three loaded magazines were retrieved from the deceased. The soldier who shot the deceased is Sgt. Madison George at Archers Post training area. That is the information we have. b) The body of the deceased is still at the Isiolo District Hospital mortuary. The postmortem was performed jointly by the Kenyan and the British pathologists, Dr. Kiluva of Isiolo Hospital, on 12th June between 9.00 hours and 1.00 hours, in which it was established that the deceased succumbed to severe haemorrhage from penetrative chest injury as a result of the bullet injury. (c) Sgt. Madison was arrested by the British military police and is still held at Nanyuki Barracks awaiting prosecution. The case is being handled at this point by the Kenya police and the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP). According to Section 6 of the Memorandum of Understanding between the Government of Kenya and the United Kingdom, the Kenyan authorities have the primary right to exercise jurisdiction with respect to alleged offences committed in Kenya and punishable by Kenya laws. I wish, therefore, to take this opportunity to warn all members of the visiting forces, including members of the British Army training in Kenya, that the Government of Kenya will deal firmly with any members who breaks the laws of this country.
Without seeing the actual details of the MOU, that seems to answer the question except for an important fact. The Soldier was on duty. I can understand the local authorities having jurisdiction if the Soldier was off duty and committed an offence off the base or the training area somewhere but this guy was doing his job.

If Soldiers who are doing their work are placed in difficult circumstances where their lives are in danger and they cannot respond in a defensive manner, we had better think again about sending them to these places.

It seems to me from reading between the lines that some Kenyans are applying a view to the MOU to seek political advantage in an election year and if the Britsh authorities were to concede this point, a British Soldier could end up in serious doo doo.
 

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