UK Citizens to be teated like criminals by US immigration.

maninblack

LE
Book Reviewer
#1
It seems that the US have announced that as of tomorrow all UK citizens entering the US will be fingerprinted and photographed.

As they have a higher crime rate than we do I assume that our government will introduce a similar tit for tat screening of of non resident US citizens..........oh, foolish me, Blair is so busy sucking on Shrub's rear that they will get a bunch of "freedom flowers" o celebrate the improvement in the terrorism situation tand the first chance at a nominated village virgin in true fuedal tradition.

MiB, who is very pissed off.
 
#2
Well for those who live in the land of the free this would not be abnormal. to get my driving license I had to give a fingerprint, to open a bank account I had to give a fingerprint, if i want to do anything with money, or identify myself uniquely for something I have to use my social security number (like a UK NI number but used more widely).

I understand from some of my American colleagues that they get finger-printed when they apply for a passport.

If you are a regular visitor to the US and qualify i suggest you apply for an INSPASS http://www.foreignborn.com/visas_imm/entering_us/4frequent-traveler.htm as you don't need to talk to an immigration official, just have your hand scanned on entry to the US, and the customs / dept of Agriculture officals give you alot less grief as well.
 
#3
MiB, It is a shame and that as Born and bred british citizen we should be treted in this manner by the US. But with the apparent ease at which asylum seekers can gain a British Passport, how long would it be before th UK is used as an entry point to the US for terrorist activities. If it hasnt done so already.

Perhaps it is the way to go to use DNA\fingerprints\NI No. to get your passport \ bank account \ benefits.


SK
 
#4
All they've done is bring the 90-day visa waiver entry people in line with what they already do to those who hold a visa.

I always found it weird that I went to the trouble of getting a visa then get fingerprinted and photographed, meanwhile any damned idiot can fill in a form (thats only designed to catch the terminally stupid) and damn near walk through.
 
#5
MIB,

Where did you get the idea that the US crime rate is higher than ours when it is, in fact, much lower.

We have 58 crimes per 100 people, the US crime rate is 43 per 100. This makes us top of the league of western countries with the US about halfway down the list.

The percentage of people who were victims of crime in a single year is "a simple but robust" way of comparing records on crime. The latest figures show the countries fall into three bands:

• Great Britain (UK excl NI), Australia, The Netherlands and Sweden had victim rates above 24 per cent;

• Canada, Denmark, Poland, Belgium, France and the US had rates between 20 and 24 per cent;

• Spain, Switzerland, Portugal, Japan and Northern Ireland all had rates under 20 per cent. (New Zealands is less than 5%)
 
#6
sandy_boots said:
MIB,

Where did you get the idea that the US crime rate is higher than ours when it is, in fact, much lower.

We have 58 crimes per 100 people, the US crime rate is 43 per 100. This makes us top of the league of western countries with the US about halfway down the list.

The percentage of people who were victims of crime in a single year is "a simple but robust" way of comparing records on crime. The latest figures show the countries fall into three bands:

• Great Britain (UK excl NI), Australia, The Netherlands and Sweden had victim rates above 24 per cent;

• Canada, Denmark, Poland, Belgium, France and the US had rates between 20 and 24 per cent;

• Spain, Switzerland, Portugal, Japan and Northern Ireland all had rates under 20 per cent. (New Zealands is less than 5%)
Hm, that's handy. I was chatting to some Americans about crime and the like. The impression I got was although you are more likely to be a victim of crime in the UK, you more likely to have your lawnmower stolen and less likely to be shot than over the pond.

I know which I'd rather.

More on topic though. I'm not comfortable with this sucessive infringement upon the rights of the individual by the governments of the US and UK. It is setting a worrying trend for the future.
 
#7
Civilian_In_Green said:
[ I was chatting to some Americans about crime and the like. The impression I got was although you are more likely to be a victim of crime in the UK, you more likely to have your lawnmower stolen and less likely to be shot than over the pond. I know which I'd rather..
I know which I'd rather, too. Your ticket to the 'States is in the post. And a baggage claim for your lawnmower.
 
#8
MIB

Don't worry we're at it too. See here.

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2004/09/29/uk_intros_semaphore_capps_uk/

Fear is a huge industry. Politicians, especially socialist politicians, nurture it so they can introduce more control. Blunkett is the Drum Major in this band of liberty thieves. Big business nurtures it to make easy money.

CIG
You're right to be worried. People (sheeple) are sleep walking towards being totally controlled by the government, big business, and various agencies in between.

As an aside, if you were Civilian in Green Shorts (CIGS) we'd all have to call you Sir...... Those were the (Imperial) days.

I want my fcuking country back from these fear peddling, apologists, we've got in charge.
 
#9


Huppy!

Chip, shoulder, large - however.

If one has nothing to hide, what's the problem? I personally feel that all "civilised countries" should have watertight / big brother type entry procedures. Then we really could "close" our borders!

 
#10
L E P Recon said:


Huppy!

Chip, shoulder, large - however.

If one has nothing to hide, what's the problem? I personally feel that all "civilised countries" should have watertight / big brother type entry procedures. Then we really could "close" our borders!

In an ideal world that would be a nice concept. However, handing over lots of personal data can be open to abuse. Would you stand there and say that the US security services, law enforcment agencies and even the government themselves, haven't abused their powers to varying degrees in the past and wouldn't do so in the future.

Go on...... can you?
 
#11
Of course, we are talking about a Govt that can mistake songwriter for a terrorist, an embassy for a barracks and a Tornado for a Scud!

Will we be fingerprinted when we go across the pond for an exercise?

Given the data protection act over here, are UK based organisations allowed to pass this data to overseas organisations that don't comply with the act?
 
#12
expat said:
Well for those who live in the land of the free this would not be abnormal. to get my driving license I had to give a fingerprint, to open a bank account I had to give a fingerprint, if i want to do anything with money, or identify myself uniquely for something I have to use my social security number (like a UK NI number but used more widely).
Don't let them fool you. much of the time you don't have to give out your Social Security number. Most often people asking for it have no legitimate need for it other than they are too lazy to assign their own number or system of identifying you.
People give out the SSN to any Tom, Dick, or Harry who asks, then wonder why their identity was stolen


expat said:
I understand from some of my American colleagues that they get finger-printed when they apply for a passport.
Required for Naturalisation, but not a Passport, unless this is a very recent change.
 
#13
Don't have a problem myself. If you don't like it, don't go to the USA. I saw the procedure on TV last night and it looks fairly painless - electrical fingerprint scanning (no ink) and a camera that looks like a web cam (steady the RLC).

It's a shame we aren't so stringent about visitors to our own country!!
 
#15
WhiteHorse said:
Of course, we are talking about a Govt that can mistake songwriter for a terrorist, an embassy for a barracks and a Tornado for a Scud!

Will we be fingerprinted when we go across the pond for an exercise?

Given the data protection act over here, are UK based organisations allowed to pass this data to overseas organisations that don't comply with the act?
Absolutely, if they want to do anything across there. For instance, the airliners have to provide a complete cargo and passenger manifest before they even take off. If the manifest isn't produced the plane won't be let into US airspace. If the Spams don't like a person on the list, they get turned back.
 
#16
Percy said:
Don't have a problem myself. If you don't like it, don't go to the USA. I saw the procedure on TV last night and it looks fairly painless - electrical fingerprint scanning (no ink) and a camera that looks like a web cam (steady the RLC).

It's a shame we aren't so stringent about visitors to our own country!!
maybe that's exactly why they are being , our immigration law is a f*cking joke , and you can buy a dodgy passport if you need one anywhere , so fair play to them , maybe it's time we did the same , might stop a few of the rackets going on..... but i doubt it. :evil:
 
#17
Would it not be more effective to stop rackets by making the country less appealing for scroungers? Eg: Requirement to actually get a job and have relevant skills in order to be accepted.

Rather than staying just as happy to dish out free housing and benefits and trying to close unclosable doors into the country.

Unless the doors can actually be closed of course, though that might involve writing off key rights for the individual. I do not know.
 

Mr Happy

LE
Moderator
#18
Easiest way to get into the states has still got to be via Canada or Mexico with a decent pair or walking boots.
The procedure on telly was a bit simple, a few seconds and that’s it – no worries. Take a chill pill lads, if Chancellor Cnut wasn’t busy giving all our money to INSERT YOU PET HATE WASTAGE HERE then we’d have enough to do the same thing – and that would be most sensible I think.
I know a 66 year old Singaporian/Canadian who has a Canadian and American passport who was driving back from Canada to the US and got pulled, because she didn’t have her US Passport with her and her Canadian passport fell out of date whilst away (stupid yes, but she is a pensioner and there is a reason these people retire, and a woman obviously) they locked her up and her 70+ husband had to drive 14 hours with the in-date US passport from home to get her out. The stupidity is that the US officers had no facility (possibly willingness) to check up the line if there was a valid passport, possibly it was a Sunday or something but you would think there would be a 24/7 way of checking someone’s ID before you banged ‘em in clink.
 
#19
I'm glad we are keeping an eye on you w*nkers. Sooner let a plane load of drunk Frogs in the country than one of you bloody Brits. :D
 

Similar threads


Latest Threads

Top