UK and Japan begin talks on deeper Defence relationship

The UK and Japan have agreed to commence formal negotiations on a Reciprocal Access Agreement (RAA) to deepen the defence relationship between the two countries.

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Well you guys did start their Naval Aviation (IIRC the first 3 or 4 IJN fighters were sopwith designs), built some of their capitol ships and even gave them a spy or two

William Francis Forbes-Sempill, 19th Lord Sempill, AFC, AFRAeS

 
This follows yesterday's similar meeting/agreement between USA, Australia, Japan, and India . . . which follows last week's similar agreement between USA, UK and Australia.

At the moment I don't see any of them being incompatible, and it developing into one BIG agreement ?!
 

Goatman

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Well you guys did start their Naval Aviation (IIRC the first 3 or 4 IJN fighters were sopwith designs), built some of their capitol ships and even gave them a spy or two

William Francis Forbes-Sempill, 19th Lord Sempill, AFC, AFRAeS


They also sent a squadron of Imperial Japanese Navy ships to the Mediterranean in WW1 - working with the Royal Navy, with whom they had a long and cordial relationship up until December 1941....


' Thus, the Japanese navy helped the Allies to maintain sea control in the Mediterranean, for which especially the British were grateful.
G. C. Dickens (1879-1962), flag commander to the commander-in-chief of the British Mediterranean Fleet, reported back to the admiralty that, whereas
' Italians are inefficient, French are unreliable, Greeks are out of the calculation, and Americans are too far away, the Japanese are excellent, but small in number.[1]

He also praised the Japanese navy’s ratio of time at sea to time in port, which was the highest of any Allied navies during the war.

In recognition of the Japanese naval effort, in 1918 a memorial was built at the Commonwealth War Graves in Malta, commemorating the seventy-eight Japanese sailors who fell in the Mediterranean. Seventy-three of them are buried there. The memorial was destroyed by a German air raid during the Second World War at the Battle of Malta and then left unattended until it was reconstructed in 1973.
 
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Well you guys did start their Naval Aviation (IIRC the first 3 or 4 IJN fighters were sopwith designs), built some of their capitol ships and even gave them a spy or two

William Francis Forbes-Sempill, 19th Lord Sempill, AFC, AFRAeS

They got the idea for the attack on Pearl Harbour from the Fleet Air Arm attack on the Italien fleet at Taronto launched by 20 Swordfish biplanes from HMS Illustrious, Two Battleships sank and one badly damaged.
 
and even gave them a spy or two

William Francis Forbes-Sempill, 19th Lord Sempill, AFC, AFRAeS
Patrick Heenan

Two actually.

Here is one of yours.

John Semer Farnsworth


515hYLIC5bL._SX329_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg
 
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They got the idea for the attack on Pearl Harbour from the Fleet Air Arm attack on the Italien fleet at Taronto launched by 20 Swordfish biplanes from HMS Illustrious, Two Battleships sank and one badly damaged.
Admiral Harry Yarnell Fleet Problem 13

Feb 1932 used 2 Carriers to launch 152 aircraft against Pearl Harbor on a Sunday morning from the exact spot the IJN would use in 1941.

Since foreign attachés were usually present, its likely a IJN attaché made notes
 
When Elphick's book was first published, I believed in it.

However, from what I have learned since was, although there was a real Patrick Heenan , I'm convinced that particular Singapore Traitor never existed.
Prior to hostilities there was a soldier (a Gunner) convicted by CM of selling details of gun positions to a Japanese agent in SIngapore but my opinion is that Elphick's story mostly comes from his own imagination.
 
They also sent a squadron of Imperial Japanese Navy ships to the Mediterranean in WW1 - working with the Royal Navy, with whom they had a long and cordial relationship up until December 1941....


' Thus, the Japanese navy helped the Allies to maintain sea control in the Mediterranean, for which especially the British were grateful.
G. C. Dickens (1879-1962), flag commander to the commander-in-chief of the British Mediterranean Fleet, reported back to the admiralty that, whereas
' Italians are inefficient, French are unreliable, Greeks are out of the calculation, and Americans are too far away, the Japanese are excellent, but small in number.[1]

He also praised the Japanese navy’s ratio of time at sea to time in port, which was the highest of any Allied navies during the war.

In recognition of the Japanese naval effort, in 1918 a memorial was built at the Commonwealth War Graves in Malta, commemorating the seventy-eight Japanese sailors who fell in the Mediterranean. Seventy-three of them are buried there. The memorial was destroyed by a German air raid during the Second World War at the Battle of Malta and then left unattended until it was reconstructed in 1973.
And also provided escorts against German surface raiders for the AIF and NZEF convoys sailing across the Indian Ocean to Egypt in preparation for the Gallipoli landings.
 
When Elphick's book was first published, I believed in it.

However, from what I have learned since was, although there was a real Patrick Heenan , I'm convinced that particular Singapore Traitor never existed.
Prior to hostilities there was a soldier (a Gunner) convicted by CM of selling details of gun positions to a Japanese agent in SIngapore but my opinion is that Elphick's story mostly comes from his own imagination.
Its hard to say. I did think most the allegations were based on circumstansial evidence. Heenan being a bit of an odd fish was a conveinent scapegoat.
 
pour encourager les autres
 

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