UK Accents

What's your usual spoken accent?

  • Southern generic

    Votes: 44 28.0%
  • Southern London

    Votes: 19 12.1%
  • Welsh

    Votes: 7 4.5%
  • Midlands

    Votes: 19 12.1%
  • Northern (red rose)

    Votes: 12 7.6%
  • Northern (white rose)

    Votes: 16 10.2%
  • North-Eastern

    Votes: 15 9.6%
  • Scottish (Lowland)

    Votes: 13 8.3%
  • Scottish (Highland)

    Votes: 5 3.2%
  • Norn Iron

    Votes: 7 4.5%

  • Total voters
    157
rural swampy wetlands, grimland dont count as its full of freaks (even bigger freaks than the rest of Lincolnshire)
for some idea what my ******* awful accent sounds like go on the youtubes and search for farmer wink, thats what i sound like
Nothing worng with that, he sounds like my great uncle who lived in Laceby all his life except for 3 years in Northern France.
 
Mine is still raw east end cockney, living up here 125 miles north of Clapton pond, for the last 31 years, I haven't lost it, in fact it helps break the ice. My children, all london kids, have still a smattering of the dialect, and my old lady retains her mile end speech patterns. It took a few months to adapt to the regional dialect of the Black country, and 15 miles away is Birmingham, a different dialect entirely. 20 minutes away, is Staffordshire, again another dialect, and Shropshire is but 30 minutes away, another dialect to master. All the regional accents, dialect, have their own words for the same article, bread rolls, are cobs, a hill is a bonk. ( Bank- incline) the list is endless, Your comment about barrow boys, is about right, only I get called Arfur Daly, Del boy, and that cockney git, and the usual boring song and dance routine....." Kness up muvver brahn" which the yam-yams* think is hilarious. (* Black country folk, used as a derogatory term by brummies''', sworn enemies)

You can go 10 miles in any direction up here, and the dialect and accent will change dramatically. The Gornal area of The black country has the most pronounced and strongest dialect and speech patterns of all the areas in middle England, to an outsider, its almost unintelligible, but it is one that hasn't changed in 500 years, Shakespeare would understand it. It is truly old English, peppered with the modern idioms.

My working life took me to the 4 corners of these islands, and I can truly say that this relatively small part of Britian, has the most diverse and different dialects and accents you will find anywhere on mainland UK. END.
Bout right. Linguists have determined the Gornal accent as being about as close to the language of Shakespeare as still exists, and a real bridge to old English. If you like this sort of thing, Cerys Matthews on BBC 6 on Sunday had a (female) Black Country poet on. Bloody marvellous.
 
Pad brat.
Born, Sale, Cheshire, relocated to Yorkshire a week later. Two years on, moved to Sussex, two years after that moved to Lincolnshire. Lincolnshire to Yorkshire, then Yorkshire to Lancashire, Lancashire to Berkshire, Berkshire to Shropshire, Shropshire to Lundin.
I still pronounce Glass as G.L.A.S.S, not Glarse; Grass as G.R.A.S.S, not Grarse, and Laugh as L.A.F.F , not Larf.
 

49er

On ROPS
On ROPs
As a born and bred lad from Cumberland, I fear you are selling us short!
I am definitely not Red Rose or White Rose nor North Eastern!
How about adding North Western - which most definitely doesn’t include those southern softies from Lancashire! :smile:
Snap. I`ve been away from that neck of the woods since 72. Not sure how much of the original accent is left, all I know is that it must have been very strong when I arrived in London. London still had proper Londoners back then, and whereas they understood Jocks and Paddies and other more exotic types most struggled with yours truly`s brand of English.
 
Mine is still raw east end cockney, living up here 125 miles north of Clapton pond, for the last 31 years, I haven't lost it, in fact it helps break the ice. My children, all london kids, have still a smattering of the dialect, and my old lady retains her mile end speech patterns. It took a few months to adapt to the regional dialect of the Black country, and 15 miles away is Birmingham, a different dialect entirely. 20 minutes away, is Staffordshire, again another dialect, and Shropshire is but 30 minutes away, another dialect to master. All the regional accents, dialect, have their own words for the same article, bread rolls, are cobs, a hill is a bonk. ( Bank- incline) the list is endless, Your comment about barrow boys, is about right, only I get called Arfur Daly, Del boy, and that cockney git, and the usual boring song and dance routine....." Kness up muvver brahn" which the yam-yams* think is hilarious. (* Black country folk, used as a derogatory term by brummies''', sworn enemies)

You can go 10 miles in any direction up here, and the dialect and accent will change dramatically. The Gornal area of The black country has the most pronounced and strongest dialect and speech patterns of all the areas in middle England, to an outsider, its almost unintelligible, but it is one that hasn't changed in 500 years, Shakespeare would understand it. It is truly old English, peppered with the modern idioms.

My working life took me to the 4 corners of these islands, and I can truly say that this relatively small part of Britian, has the most diverse and different dialects and accents you will find anywhere on mainland UK. END.
The Del Boy references always make me laugh, the character was born and bred in Peckham, the other side of the water, a wide boy? Yes, a Londoner? Most certainly, a cockney? Never in a million years
 
Snap. I`ve been away from that neck of the woods since 72. Not sure how much of the original accent is left, all I know is that it must have been very strong when I arrived in London. London still had proper Londoners back then, and whereas they understood Jocks and Paddies and other more exotic types most struggled with yours truly`s brand of English.
I left in 1971 - same detail! I shared a room at Harrogate with 5 scousers and a lad from Huddersfield. None of them could work out my “thees and thous”!
I still sound very ‘northern’ and working class, but my sisters reckon I turned posh years ago!
 
Sprog! '55 - '58. I can't remember the class, although I think they would've been numbered differently back then. I heard the Albert became an academy a wee while back.

Springburn born. I used to go to the old serials and cartoons at the ABC minors on a Saturday morning. "The Princes" in Gourlay Street I think it was called. The last time I was there Gourlay St, below Millarbank St, had been demolished. In the afternoon watch the "Peasie." Sometime in between I'd go swimming at the public baths/swimming pool in a cul de sac near Balgray Hill, but on the opposite side, off of Springburn Road. After the swim into the chippie for a 1d fritter. A small world.
 
I was at a party once in Shoreditch, everyone saying how great being a "Londoner" was. Out of the 20 odd "Londoners" there only 2 where actually born in London. Everyone else moved there after uni. All very surreal.

My Dad was 4th generation (Crystal Palace area) but moved about a lot and settled in Scotland for a long time, started a family with my mum (who is from the Borders). He was fascinated with local history and how accents changed over time. My Dad always sounded like Danny Baker to me.
His mate Harvey grew up in Southwark, his family ran a fish & chip shop by Borough Market. As the area got gentrified all that history and family links got lost.

I am only middle-aged , but the London I grew up in no longer exists.

.....And I am knocking on 70, my london has gone completely, all my school friends have moved out , the families I knew in my youth have all disappeared, the shops and open fronted stores, owned by local familys have now been taken over by outsiders, by that I mean outside Britian. My last visit down the smoke was very emotional, its now a different, dirtier, noisier, faster, dangerious, and insanely expensive. The 3 bed 1895 terraced house I bought in 1984 in the E11 area, for £19.5K, now sells for £500K , insane. last trip down, a tin of fizz, and a cheese roll, £5.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
Just googled it and apparently there are over 160 English language dialects worldwide. This obviously includes colonials and foreigners.

Apparently there are at least 43 in the U.K.

https://www.quora.com/How-many-accents-are-in-the-UK
Not counting those of us who dont have identifiable regional accents through dint of education, upbringing or as for many on here constant regional relocation!
 
Sprog! '55 - '58. I can't remember the class, although I think they would've been numbered differently back then. I heard the Albert became an academy a wee while back.

Springburn born. I used to go to the old serials and cartoons at the ABC minors on a Saturday morning. "The Princes" in Gourlay Street I think it was called. The last time I was there Gourlay St, below Millarbank St, had been demolished. In the afternoon watch the "Peasie." Sometime in between I'd go swimming at the public baths/swimming pool in a cul de sac near Balgray Hill, but on the opposite side, off of Springburn Road. After the swim into the chippie for a 1d fritter. A small world.
Probably numbered LV - LVIII that far back.
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Not counting those of us who dont have identifiable regional accents through dint of education, upbringing or as for many on here constant regional relocation!
Indeed. The generic forces / lower tier boarding school accent.
 
As a born and bred lad from Cumberland, I fear you are selling us short!
I am definitely not Red Rose or White Rose nor North Eastern!
How about adding North Western - which most definitely doesn’t include those southern softies from Lancashire! :smile:
That does make me smile. Having moved to the western extremity of Cumberland aged 12, with strong Lancastrian origins and a smattering of North Wales thrown in, I was labeled a ******* southerner!
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Growing up as a North Londoner I was vaguely aware of the slight differences between how I spoke and those south of the river, cockneys and Home Counties spoke.

But I could tell it was all related and had spawned from the same language.

It was only when I joined up that I realised what a mental country this is accent wise.

Take Manchester and Liverpool for example, two cities just a few miles apart and they speak completely differently. The two dialects are in no way similar.

Since moving to Cumbria I’ve noticed vast differences between what was Westmorland and what was Cumberland. The “marra” west Cumbrian accent is very distinctive and interestingly female marra is completely different to male marra. There is a lot of Irish influence (as with Scouse) from the imported workers.

Likewise Carlisle seems to have a distinctive blend of Cumberland and Westmorland with some Jock and even Geordie influences. Even just the variation in a single county is massive.

I recall some Westmorland farmers having “craic” in the pub a few years back and I genuinely couldn’t understand them. The conversation should’ve been recorded and put in a museum for future generations to hear.
 
Growing up as a North Londoner I was vaguely aware of the slight differences between how I spoke and those south of the river, cockneys and Home Counties spoke.

But I could tell it was all related and had spawned from the same language.

It was only when I joined up that I realised what a mental country this is accent wise.

Take Manchester and Liverpool for example, two cities just a few miles apart and they speak completely differently. The two dialects are in no way similar.

Since moving to Cumbria I’ve noticed vast differences between what was Westmorland and what was Cumberland. The “marra” west Cumbrian accent is very distinctive and interestingly female marra is completely different to male marra. There is a lot of Irish influence (as with Scouse) from the imported workers.

Likewise Carlisle seems to have a distinctive blend of Cumberland and Westmorland with some Jock and even Geordie influences. Even just the variation in a single county is massive.

I recall some Westmorland farmers having “craic” in the pub a few years back and I genuinely couldn’t understand them. The conversation should’ve been recorded and put in a museum for future generations to hear.
Don’t get West Cumbrians started on the ‘jam eater’ discussion. Despite their howls of protest, it is residents of Workington that hold that coveted title!
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Don’t get West Cumbrians started on the ‘jam eater’ discussion. Despite their howls of protest, it is residents of Workington that hold that coveted title!
Did you see the advert for the new KFC in Workington?
7D635A52-50E2-4397-8850-442025436AAA.jpeg
 
50 years ago, a local up here could probably identify at least a dozen different accents, including the Northumbrian R.

That's an interesting one, back in the Middle Ages, a knight called Harry Hotspur..... Sir Henry Percy,

A great local hero, rrrrolled his rrrrrs.

So even up to recent times, the locals, still rrrroll their rrrrs as a tribute, became part of their accent.
 

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