UK Accents

What's your usual spoken accent?

  • Southern generic

    Votes: 44 28.0%
  • Southern London

    Votes: 19 12.1%
  • Welsh

    Votes: 7 4.5%
  • Midlands

    Votes: 19 12.1%
  • Northern (red rose)

    Votes: 12 7.6%
  • Northern (white rose)

    Votes: 16 10.2%
  • North-Eastern

    Votes: 15 9.6%
  • Scottish (Lowland)

    Votes: 13 8.3%
  • Scottish (Highland)

    Votes: 5 3.2%
  • Norn Iron

    Votes: 7 4.5%

  • Total voters
    157
#82
Any reason why only sarf London gets an option?
East lundun mush, no wot I mean guv, the cockney twang, vocabulary, and dialect is peculiar to east of the square mile, saff lundun has a slightly different accent, as does west london, 2 citys, Westminster, and london, three accents, and speech patterns, be lucky.
 
#85
Non of the selection although it used to be an 'Hey, up lad' I had to change the accent so I could order a beer, 'pinta bitter mayt' wasn't quite cutting the mustard and pointing at a pump was just plain rude.









(with thanks to @rampant for pointing out I had replied to a 4 yr old thread by mistake).
 
#86
Nidrie does not talk like Morning side
But Morning Side and Kelvinside can sound the same if you don't know the markers (there is no word for biscuit in Morning Side for example).
 
#88
Likewise Glasgow...............Possil sounds nothing like Giffnock
I moved to Springburn when I was six, still sound Anniesland/Knightswood/Westend, though I did stay at Hillhead Primary until I went to Albert Secondary.
 
#89
My accent is out and out Cockney, think of Bob Hoskins in The Long Good Friday and that’s my accent (even though he wasn’t born in the East End), many are surprised when they hear me talk and then find out what I do for a living, everyone seems to think all Cockneys should be/are Barrow boys
 
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#90
Spot on about the social class/accents in Edinburgh. Even in SE London the accent changes dynamically due to age and location. Not many propped Londoners left any more...they all moved to Edinburgh for the cheap houses.

My father 92, born graces alley, off cable street, Stepney, ( Army No 14943493) he told me years ago , that before the war, you could tell not only the area of east london that a bloke came from, but the street, Hitler solved that problem, as the bombing dispersed the old established families into the new towns and suburbs. There are not many old original families left in that small part of east london, (E1) its all trendies and bloody hipsters.

Edit to add:- He witnessed his elder brothers fighting the black shirts, at the infamous battle of cable street in 1936.
 
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#92
My accent is also a bastardised mix; of Brummie (not Black Country - bloody Yammers) and Mancunian, again depending on the occasion.
SWMBO says I have a Brummie accent normally but my Manc comes to the forefront when I'm annoyed or when I come back from visiting family back in Gods city. She even reckons its gets stronger just talking to my mum and dad on the phone.
Bastard mix here. Grew up in Staffordshire, after the army lived in north Wales and have now lived in Hampshire for 18 years. If I speak to my parents on the phone, the missus tells me immediately how my accent reverts to my youth. Mind you, she is also a Staffordshire ex-pat, and her family are from Stoke, poor cow.
All my midlands relatives now think I am a yokel/soft southern shandy-drinking poof.
 
#93
3 different accents in the East Midlands at least. Enjoy the video, and perhaps sack the possible vote selections, as it wouldn't all fit on the same page.


 
#97
My accent is out and Cockney, many are surprised when they hear me talk and then find out what I do for a living, everyone seems to think all Cockneys should be/are Barrow boys
Mine is still raw east end cockney, living up here 125 miles north of Clapton pond, for the last 31 years, I haven't lost it, in fact it helps break the ice. My children, all london kids, have still a smattering of the dialect, and my old lady retains her mile end speech patterns. It took a few months to adapt to the regional dialect of the Black country, and 15 miles away is Birmingham, a different dialect entirely. 20 minutes away, is Staffordshire, again another dialect, and Shropshire is but 30 minutes away, another dialect to master. All the regional accents, dialect, have their own words for the same article, bread rolls, are cobs, a hill is a bonk. ( Bank- incline) the list is endless, Your comment about barrow boys, is about right, only I get called Arfur Daly, Del boy, and that cockney git, and the usual boring song and dance routine....." Kness up muvver brahn" which the yam-yams* think is hilarious. (* Black country folk, used as a derogatory term by brummies''', sworn enemies)

You can go 10 miles in any direction up here, and the dialect and accent will change dramatically. The Gornal area of The black country has the most pronounced and strongest dialect and speech patterns of all the areas in middle England, to an outsider, its almost unintelligible, but it is one that hasn't changed in 500 years, Shakespeare would understand it. It is truly old English, peppered with the modern idioms.

My working life took me to the 4 corners of these islands, and I can truly say that this relatively small part of Britian, has the most diverse and different dialects and accents you will find anywhere on mainland UK. END.
 
#98
English Rural

 
#99
Northwest which has been wrestled down but not fully submitted by southern. With a smattering of mashed up wez cuntry

Strange fact: If I am required to be intimidating or threatening I lapse into the opposing accent so when chinning off jocks I turn into some sort of cockney geezer ****. When it’s southern softies they get a Cumbria/Lancashire cocktail
 
My father 92, born graces alley, off cable street, Stepney, ( Army No 14943493) he told me years ago , that before the war, you could tell not only the area of east london that a bloke came from, but the street, Hitler solved that problem, as the bombing dispersed the old established families into the new towns and suburbs. There are not many old original families left in that small part of east london, (E1) its all trendies and bloody hipsters.
I was at a party once in Shoreditch, everyone saying how great being a "Londoner" was. Out of the 20 odd "Londoners" there only 2 where actually born in London. Everyone else moved there after uni. All very surreal.

My Dad was 4th generation (Crystal Palace area) but moved about a lot and settled in Scotland for a long time, started a family with my mum (who is from the Borders). He was fascinated with local history and how accents changed over time. My Dad always sounded like Danny Baker to me.
His mate Harvey grew up in Southwark, his family ran a fish & chip shop by Borough Market. As the area got gentrified all that history and family links got lost.

I am only middle-aged , but the London I grew up in no longer exists.
 

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