UK Accents

What's your usual spoken accent?

  • Southern generic

    Votes: 44 28.0%
  • Southern London

    Votes: 19 12.1%
  • Welsh

    Votes: 7 4.5%
  • Midlands

    Votes: 19 12.1%
  • Northern (red rose)

    Votes: 12 7.6%
  • Northern (white rose)

    Votes: 16 10.2%
  • North-Eastern

    Votes: 15 9.6%
  • Scottish (Lowland)

    Votes: 13 8.3%
  • Scottish (Highland)

    Votes: 5 3.2%
  • Norn Iron

    Votes: 7 4.5%

  • Total voters
    157
Pulled into MRS Grobbendonk in darkness on a BAOR reinforcment exercise. I could not understand the refuelling soldiers and after a couple of exchanges asked if I could speak to an officer perhaps? Indignant voice from the darkness informs me that he was an officer Jimmie !!!
I believe that I have pulled into a few Mrs Grobben-Donks in the dark in my time - though not when married.
 
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overopensights

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In my village in Yorkshire half a century ago the ultimate verbal challenge was 'don't thee thou me'. Thee being the polite form (Sie in German, vous in French) and thou being the much more familiar and in the circumstances insulting 'du' and 'tu'. This could well be the warning that a punch-up was in the offing.
Never thought I'd give Brotherton a funny, I think it's the 3rd in a few weeks. Brotherton greetings! the nearer we get to Brexit the happier you seem to become?
 
In my village in Yorkshire half a century ago the ultimate verbal challenge was 'don't thee thou me'. Thee being the polite form (Sie in German, vous in French) and thou being the much more familiar and in the circumstances insulting 'du' and 'tu'. This could well be the warning that a punch-up was in the offing.
@Brotherton Lad,

My sister studied linguistics at university in the late 80s, which was great as I got to shag several of her friends what with being a squaddie.

I found the subject very interesting, to the extent that I have read, and even grasped some of, Chomsky.


The falling out of use of "thee/thou" has been looked at academically as part of a complex consideration of class in the UK; the gist being that a lack of easily defined status in conversation is a two edged sword, enabling cross-status discourse on the one hand but leading to Machiavellian distortions in negotiations in, say, politics and industrial relations.

I may dig some of this up; it was nigh on 30 years ago.
 

overopensights

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Book Reviewer
quite a lot of the coal valleys families can trace their forebearers back to Somerset ,
the Ebbw valley for sure,as a lot of the mines were opened by somerset men in the 1880/90s,
my own grandfather who was from Nailsea Somerset got killed by a roof collapse down Waunlwyd colliery.
Greetings Ordinaryforces! There is an A4 book on the market in and about Newport, it is called 'Valleys of Tears' it lists all the miners killed over the whole period of coal mining, and gives the details of the tragedies. . It is on sale at the Scenic Route Visitor Centre Cwmcarn. Masses of photos and detailed info.

One interesting fact is how miner's pay was cut immediately from the hour of death and the family 'thrown onto the Parish.
 

overopensights

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Book Reviewer
The other fact is colloquialisms and the use of them in different areas in the UK, for example, a Welsh Inf Company attached to the Grenadier Gds caused lots of unnecessary AF 252s to be raised. One particular instance that I witnessed was a Welsh soldier watching a Gren L/Sgt digging a hole in the ground. Welsh soldier " What are you at there butty?" He was descended on by the irate Grenadier. I intervened to explain to the irate one that the Welshman was merely implying that he was prepared to assist. Which in fact he was.
 

Goatman

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Book Reviewer

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