UK Accents

What's your usual spoken accent?

  • Southern generic

    Votes: 44 28.0%
  • Southern London

    Votes: 19 12.1%
  • Welsh

    Votes: 7 4.5%
  • Midlands

    Votes: 19 12.1%
  • Northern (red rose)

    Votes: 12 7.6%
  • Northern (white rose)

    Votes: 16 10.2%
  • North-Eastern

    Votes: 15 9.6%
  • Scottish (Lowland)

    Votes: 13 8.3%
  • Scottish (Highland)

    Votes: 5 3.2%
  • Norn Iron

    Votes: 7 4.5%

  • Total voters
    157
when I reported for basic in 1965 it was an all arms camp and as such boys from all over the UK came together.
now this was prior to instant comms as we have today and the Tv was shyte so the regional accents were still very strong,I think it was three days before we got a conversation going, (try listening to a vally accent talking to someone from the highlands
even on the train to the camp I met a lad from watchett **** it was difficult but he turned out a likeable lad (dave Hurrell if you're still about I'm on face book.)
eta all the boys from yorkshire sounded as if they were reading the Bible..with their (thee thine thysen and such)
 
when I reported for basic in 1965 it was an all arms camp and as such boys from all over the UK came together.
now this was prior to instant comms as we have today and the Tv was shyte so the regional accents were still very strong,I think it was three days before we got a conversation going, (try listening to a vally accent talking to someone from the highlands
even on the train to the camp I met a lad from watchett **** it was difficult but he turned out a likeable lad (dave Hurrell if you're still about I'm on face book.)
eta all the boys from yorkshire sounded as if they were reading the Bible..with their (thee thine thysen and such)

In my village in Yorkshire half a century ago the ultimate verbal challenge was 'don't thee thou me'. Thee being the polite form (Sie in German, vous in French) and thou being the much more familiar and in the circumstances insulting 'du' and 'tu'. This could well be the warning that a punch-up was in the offing.
 
Years ago the Overseas Service of the BBC radio with its RP was the English standard that Johnny foreigner would listen to and aspire to. Around the late 1980's when the Left leaning shysters gradually took control of the national broadcaster, the champagne socialists decided that regional accents were the way to go. It's been going downhill ever since.
I think the rot set in when they stopped playing Lillibulero before the news

 
I was brought up in Breconshire, joined a Welsh Bn and never lost my accent. I now live in Somerset, but often go back to Wales to gain back some culture. When in Somerset I am often asked, " Where do you come from in Wales?"
But in Wales they sometimes ask: "Where the feck did you get that 'Hooray Henry' accent?" That really winds Oi roight up!
I am exactly opposite. Born and raised in Zummerzet and now live in the valleys!!

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I think the rot set in when they stopped playing Lillibulero before the news

And reading the aforementioned news in evening dress!

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overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
I am exactly opposite. Born and raised in Zummerzet and now live in the valleys!!

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I'll swop you for the singing, however this coming Saturday we have the Bridgend Male Choir, Eisteddfod winners singing in St Cuthburts Church Wells, Always a good event, we mostly have a full house of Anglo Saxons!
 
I am exactly opposite. Born and raised in Zummerzet and now live in the valleys!!

Sent from my SM-G973F using Tapatalk
quite a lot of the coal valleys families can trace their forebearers back to Somerset ,
the Ebbw valley for sure,as a lot of the mines were opened by somerset men in the 1880/90s,
my own grandfather who was from Nailsea Somerset got killed by a roof collapse down Waunlwyd colliery.
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Last edited:
In my village in Yorkshire half a century ago the ultimate verbal challenge was 'don't thee thou me'. Thee being the polite form (Sie in German, vous in French) and thou being the much more familiar and in the circumstances insulting 'du' and 'tu'. This could well be the warning that a punch-up was in the offing.
...and there's only the North Riding that does it proper. Which is odd considering most people know the words of the 23rd Psalm.

Incidentally, thou/Du is singular, thee/Sie is (or may be) plural. So thee/Sie (/Ihnen if dative) isn't an insult in North Yorkshire or Germany.
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
...and there's only the North Riding that does it proper. Which is odd considering most people know the words of the 23rd Psalm.

Incidentally, thou/Du is singular, thee/Sie is (or may be) plural. So thee/Sie (/Ihnen if dative) isn't an insult in North Yorkshire or Germany.
Nope

Thou = 2nd Person Singular Nominative (Subjective)
Thee = 2nd Person Singular Accusative ((Object)
Thy = 2nd Person Singular Possessive (before words beginning with a consonant)
Thine = 2nd Person Singular Possessive (before words beginning with a vowel)

You/Your are 2nd person Plural as is ye (which is used for the 2nd person plural nominative)
You is interchangable Nominative & Accusative

I should have just posted this pic

Thee Thou Thine.jpg


From James Buchanan's 1767 "A Regular English Syntax, Wherein is Exhibited the Whole Variety of English Construction, Properly Exemplified; To Which is Added the Elegant Manner of Arranging Words, and Members of Sentences; the Whole Reduced to Practice, for the Use of Private Young Gentlemen and Ladies, as well as of our Most Eminent Schools."
 
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Born and raised in the Valleys, moved to the Gower, where most of my classmates families had moved to South Wales for work, friends dads from Glasgow,London and Leeds.
Joined up, best mate from Bailieston, absorbed accent of him.
Uni in London with mates from all over
Graduated and joined a firm 12 miles up the road in Welsh speaking Ammanford, and was known as ' the English one' by the locals, some would even spin on their heels, when they found out the boss wasn't in, and they had to deal with me!
SWMBO from Keynsham, so got Somerset in there too.

And today, surveyed a house in Barry, and the chap said " you must be annoyed by last weekend then, you know, with the rugby"
I said- "I'm from Swansea FFS"- I didn't actually say FFS, but you know what I mean.
Americans think I'm an Aussie.
 
From James Buchanan's 1767 "A Regular English Syntax...
Sorry, that's English and he's Scottish. My post referred to Tyke and German.

Theres no "you" in Tyke. Thee, thissel or thissen. Also thissels and thissens.
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Sorry, that's English and he's Scottish. My post referred to Tyke and German.

Theres no "you" in Tyke. Thee, thissel or thissen. Also thissels and thissens.
What's the essential difference between thissel & thissen, is it gendered, case, tense or regional variation or are they simply interchangeable?
 
There's no option for me to choose from.

I don't sound very Welsh at all, I've been in the sarf of England for too long, and few people pick up on it.
It's more to do with my syntax than accent that gives it away. Some people have known me for years and had no idea.
 
What's the essential difference between thissel & thissen, is it gendered, case, tense or regional variation or are they simply interchangeable?
Thissel is NR, thissen is WR. Haven't a clue which they use in ER.

It gets more complicated with words like ginnel and gennel (which may also be pronounced as jinnel and jennel), especially when its alley where I come from.

Then there's chip oil, not to be confused with dripping... ...and one man's pattie is another man's fishcake. Or a fishcake might be a rissole. But a pattie isn't a rissole. It might be a scallop, though.
 

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