UCAS points

#1
Right, currently finishing my last year of University, and I've noticed that they've upped the UCAS requirements for officers from 180 to 240. I've got 200, don't suppose my degree will help me out at all? I'm assuming that without the extra 40 I haven't got a chance now regardless...

Probably time to find out how to get 40 extra. 8-O
 

sup rec

LE
Book Reviewer
#2
Your degree will be worth UCAS points so add that to the total you currently have. Reemeber the other criteria though, 35 ALIS points from your top 7 GCSE's (must include Maths, English and Science or a foreign language) and at least 2 x A levels.
 
#3
Ah thanks, should be fine on the GCSE's, got plenty of A's and B's there, and the UCAS points I do have come from 3 A levels.
Didn't realise the degree was worth any UCAS points though, any idea how many? I can't seem to see it on the UCAS tariff list.
 
#5
Ask the uni but don't count on them knowing. It would be good to fire off an email to UCAS and get a reply back from them, print it out and keep it. It may also be worth following the email with a letter to also get a letter response back from them.

This subject interests me as I have a kiddy who will be looking for uni soon and has also expressed an interest in a military career.

The only bit of online info I have found indicating the potential value of a higher education qualification shows that a HND they deliver is worth 240 pts. Thats here:

Why a BTEC HND is a great alternative to university

Specifically this bit:

What will I learn?

At Oxford College we offer 14 different subjects at BTEC HND level from Animal Psychology to Sports Science as well as Health & Social Care, Business Studies, Law and Psychology.

These 2 year courses are broken down into 16 units of work each requiring around 60 hours of study time. A coursework assignment is completed at the end of each unit and sent to your tutor for marking. The coursework marks will go toward forming your final grade.

The courses also carry 240 UCAS points for anyone wishing to top up to a full honours degree with a third year at university.
Good luck.
 
#6
A Bachelor's degree is 360 UCAS Points, well at UCL it is.
 
#7
Why does a degree give you UCAS points? Its is points to get you into university to get a degree, hence the name University College Administration Service.

Anywho, I was always under the impression that a degree over rided the need for UCAS points for officer application?
 
#8
Am genuinely intrigued to what degree you gained entry with 200 UCAS points?

But agree with previous poster - surely that applies only to those few brave souls these days who apply straight from school without going to university?
 
#9
Am genuinely intrigued to what degree you gained entry with 200 UCAS points?

But agree with previous poster - surely that applies only to those few brave souls these days who apply straight from school without going to university?
History at Aberystwyth. I had an unconditional offer based off an entrance exam, so I'd have gotten in whatever grades I got...probably killed my motivation a bit, hence the grades being a lot lower than I would have got had I put in more effort.

I heard from a couple of people in the Navy that they turn down guys who have a degree but not enough UCAS points, though they could be wrong. To be honest, I've had mixed messages on the matter, as the above replies will probably tell you, probably just best to ask when I go to the recruiting office in a month or so.
 
#11
Okay, I'm looking at a 2:1 unless my dissertation goes horribly wrong.
If I ended up getting a 2:2, would it be worth spending a year doing an extra A-level or AS at my local college?
 

cpunk

LE
Moderator
#13
News to me. I seemingly fit the same bill, got horrible A-levels somehow got accepted to uni ended with a 2:1. However officer is closed to me as I don't have 240.
The way I read it is 240 in a minimun requirement. There is NO requirement for a degree unless you you're going PQO
You read it wrong. If you have 2:1 from a recognised university in an acceptable subject (and there are very few which aren't) then you're qualified to be an officer.
 
#16
#17
I know this is an old post but is there any update on this, the problem seems to be a current one as I am having the same issue,:

- GCSEs are level 2 (secondary education) and these are where you get the 35 ALIS points. (crucially these include the specific subjects, Math, Science and English - minimum grade C) this is the only time the subject matter is specific.

- BTEC Diplomas or A levels are at Level 3 (further education) this is where 180 UCAS points are derived (crucially " UCAS do not endorse or advise any employer use UCAS points towards a job application, as it is a system used as a guideline for University entry only")... (and herein lies the problem) interestingly these 180 UCAS points can be for ANY subject; childcare, needlepoint etc. the UCAS points show that the candidate is educated to a reasonable standard at level 3 and able to go on to level 4.

- Universities start at level 4 (higher education) through to level 5 as a graduate and onwards to post graduate study. the rub is that there are no UCAS points awarded for University study because it is a higher level of study and therefor cannot be measured, as UCAS measure suitability to study at university, so assigning UCAS points to university study is exactly like shutting the stable door after the horse has bolted, you have achived the ONE function the UCAS (Universities and Colleges Admissions Service) system is set up to do - get you in to a university

I left school and went straight into work, my professional qualifications got me into university to study a BA (Hons) doing evening classes for 5 years.

So although a graduate at level 5 education far exceeds the minimum army requirement of level 3, I do not have any UCAS point... in short to get physical "UCAS points" I would have to go back to college to take exams that deem me educated enough to start the level 4 education that I have already completed successfully that would then deem me educated enough to start the level 5 education that I have also already completed successfully?!?...

Now surely that's just bonkers!?!

Has anyone had any success getting accepted without UCAS points but with a higher level of education? I haven't push the point as I don't want to come across "as your system is flawed" but it kind of is...

(rant over)
 
#18
I was in my local AFCO today and he was still quoting it as 180 points.

@Doris McHardcore It's not as black and white as that. Go into your local AFCO and ask,they'll probably say that it's okay,I asked the sergeant there today about my lack of a D in science but as I had my A-levels and am at Uni he told me he could waive that without any problem. He said there was a system in place for that sort of thing, in other words. Not black and white.

Edit:see 2x posts after this, they seem a little more certain.
 
Last edited:

sup rec

LE
Book Reviewer
#19
I was in my local AFCO today and he was still quoting it as 180 points.

@Doris McHardcore It's not as black and white as that. Go into your local AFCO and ask,they'll probably say that it's okay,I asked the sergeant there today about my lack of a D in science but as I had my A-levels and am at Uni he told me he could waive that without any problem. He said there was a system in place for that sort of thing, in other words. Not black and white.
No recruiter in an office can waive anything. The only people that can do that is the NRC after speaking to the SPSO and requesting it.
 

sup rec

LE
Book Reviewer
#20
I know this is an old post but is there any update on this, the problem seems to be a current one as I am having the same issue,:

- GCSEs are level 2 (secondary education) and these are where you get the 35 ALIS points. (crucially these include the specific subjects, Math, Science and English - minimum grade C) this is the only time the subject matter is specific.

- BTEC Diplomas or A levels are at Level 3 (further education) this is where 180 UCAS points are derived (crucially " UCAS do not endorse or advise any employer use UCAS points towards a job application, as it is a system used as a guideline for University entry only")... (and herein lies the problem) interestingly these 180 UCAS points can be for ANY subject; childcare, needlepoint etc. the UCAS points show that the candidate is educated to a reasonable standard at level 3 and able to go on to level 4.

- Universities start at level 4 (higher education) through to level 5 as a graduate and onwards to post graduate study. the rub is that there are no UCAS points awarded for University study because it is a higher level of study and therefor cannot be measured, as UCAS measure suitability to study at university, so assigning UCAS points to university study is exactly like shutting the stable door after the horse has bolted, you have achived the ONE function the UCAS (Universities and Colleges Admissions Service) system is set up to do - get you in to a university

I left school and went straight into work, my professional qualifications got me into university to study a BA (Hons) doing evening classes for 5 years.

So although a graduate at level 5 education far exceeds the minimum army requirement of level 3, I do not have any UCAS point... in short to get physical "UCAS points" I would have to go back to college to take exams that deem me educated enough to start the level 4 education that I have already completed successfully that would then deem me educated enough to start the level 5 education that I have also already completed successfully?!?...

Now surely that's just bonkers!?!

Has anyone had any success getting accepted without UCAS points but with a higher level of education? I haven't push the point as I don't want to come across "as your system is flawed" but it kind of is...

(rant over)
Candidates must have achieved a minimum of 180 UCAS Tariff pointsfrom a maximum of 3[1] subjects, with a minimum of 2 at National Level 3[2] or National or International equivalents. A first degree will no longer be accepted as an automatic waiver to UCAS attainment.

Taken from RGI's. That said it is no longer an 'automatic waiver'. It does not mean that it can't be waived.
 

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