U.S chevrons

Discussion in 'Military History and Militaria' started by Corps_Asset, Aug 29, 2009.

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  1. noticed whist watching an old film that the U.S Army used to wear their chevrons pointed down, like us. But why and when did they change it to pointing up like they have now a days?
     
  2. If anyone can answer another question at the same time, a serious question i've never found an answer for - why do the Americans have quite so many Sgt ranks? At really odd levels and places, ie each 'squad' will have a Sergent in command, and then there'll be a slightly higher ranking sgt acting as troop sgt...


    Can someone elucidate please where exactly they came cross this system?
     
  3. I was reading their equivilent of 'Soldier' this morning while in the San Fransisco USO and there was an article about this and the sergeant ranks. Annoyingly it didn't really explain either.

    Anyone know what the stripes on the lower arms of their dress uniforms are for too?

    [​IMG]
     
  4. They are for time served.
    LINKY
     
  5. They are service stripes. The Army awards service stripes for every 3 years of active duty.

    IIRC on the Dress Blues you only have service stripes, on the Class A (Dress Greens) one sleeve (left if memory serves me) was service and was a hash, while the right were combat bars for each tour.

    I believe the sleeve placement to be correct because the right sleeve was where you displayed the "combat patch", unit insignia of the unit under which you served during combat.
     
  6. Combat Service stripes/Overseas Service bars (also known as "Hershey bars" after Gen Hershey the 1940 head of Selective Service) are straight bars 1 for every 6 months in Combat theaters worn on the right sleeve.


    http://www.apd.army.mil/pdffiles/r670_1.pdf



    d. By whom worn. Soldiers are authorized wear of the overseas service bar as indicated below.
    (1) One overseas service bar is authorized for each 6–month period of active Federal service as a member of a U.S. Service outside CONUS, from 7 December 1941 until 2 September 1946, both dates inclusive. In computing overseas
    service, Alaska is considered outside CONUS. An overseas service bar is not authorized for a fraction of a 6–month period.


    (2) One overseas service bar is authorized for each 6–month period of active Federal service as a member of a U.S. Service in Korea, from 27 June 1950 until 27 July 1954, both dates inclusive. Credit toward an overseas service bar is authorized for each month of active Federal service as a member of the U.S. Army serving in the designated hostile fire area in Korea from 1 April 1968 until 31 August 1973. The months of arrival to, and departure from the hostile fire pay area are counted as whole months. When credit is given for a month for hostile fire pay, credit for a corresponding month is given toward an overseas service bar.

    (3) One overseas service bar is authorized for each 6–month period active Federal service as a member of a U.S.
    Service in Vietnam, from 1 July 1958 to 28 March 1973. The months of arrival to, and departure from Vietnam are counted as whole months for credit toward the overseas service bar. Periods of TDY service in Vietnam where credit is given for hostile fire pay for 1 month, also may be given credit for a corresponding month towards award of an overseas service bar.

    (4) One overseas service bar is authorized for each 6–month period of Federal service as a member of a U.S.
    Service in the Dominican Republic, from 29 April 1965 to 21 September 1966, both dates inclusive.

    (5) One overseas service bar is authorized for each 6–month period of Federal service as a member of a U.S.
    Service in Laos, from 1 January 1966 to 28 March 1973.

    (6) One overseas service bar is authorized for each 6–month period of Federal service as a member of a U.S.
    Service in Cambodia from 1 January 1971 until 28 March 1973. Personnel must qualify for hostile fire pay to receive credit for an overseas service bar. The months of arrival to, and departure from the hostile fire pay area are counted as whole months.

    (7) One overseas service bar is authorized for each 6–month period of Federal service as a member of a U.S.
    Service in Lebanon, from 6 August 1983 to 24 April 1984, for the two units listed in paragraph 28–17b(6). The months of arrival to, and departure from the hostile fire pay area are counted as whole months.

    (8) One overseas service bar is authorized for each 6–month period of Federal service as a member of a U.S.
    Service in the Persian Gulf from 27 July 1987 to 1 August 1990, for Operation Earnest Will. The months of arrival to, and departure from Operation Earnest Will are counted as whole months.

    (9) One overseas service bar is authorized for each 6–month period of Federal service as a member of a U.S.
    Service in the Persian Gulf from 17 January 1991 to 31 August 1993, for Operation Desert Storm. The months of
    arrival to, and departure from Operation Desert Storm are counted as whole months.

    (10) One overseas service bar is authorized for each 6–month period of Federal service as a member of a U.S.
    Service who participated in El Salvador, from 1 January 1981 to 1 February 1992. The months of arrival to, and
    departure from El Salvador are counted as whole months.

    (11) One overseas service bar is authorized for each 6-month period of Federal service as a member of a U.S. Service in Somalia, from 5 December 1992 to 31 March 1995. The months of arrival to, and departure from Somalia are counted as whole months.

    (12) One overseas service bar is authorized for each 6-month period of Federal service as a member of a U.S.
    Service participating in Operation Enduring Freedom, the CENTCOM area of operations, or under the control of the Combatant Commander, CENTCOM, from 19 September 2001 to a date to be determined. The months of arrival to, and departure from the CENTCOM area of operations are counted as whole months.

    (13) One overseas service bar is authorized for each 6–month period of Federal service as a member of a U.S.
    Service participating in Operation Iraqi Freedom, the CENTCOM area of operations, or under the control of the
    Combatant Commander, CENTCOM, from 19 March 2003 to a date to be determined. The months of arrival to, and departure from the CENTCOM area of operations are counted as whole months.

    (14) Service as a member of a U.S. Armed Service for periods of less than 6 months duration, which otherwise
    meets the requirements for the award of overseas service bars, may be combined by adding the number of months to determine creditable service toward the total number of overseas service bars authorized for the following: World War II, Korea, Vietnam, The Dominican Republic, Laos, Cambodia, Lebanon, Operation Earnest Will, Grenada, Operation Just Cause, Operation Desert Storm, El Salvador, Somalia, Operation Enduring Freedom, and Operation Iraqi Freedom.


    e. Computation of World War II service.
    (1) Service is computed between the dates of departure from, and arrival to a port in the United States or the
    boundary of CONUS. The day of departure and the day of return are included. The expression “each 6-month period of Federal service” is interpreted to authorize the wear of an overseas service bar for overseas service of various lengths, performed either continuously or at intervals, when the total service equaled or exceeded 6 months. Thus, an individual who served 4 months and 10 days outside CONUS and returned there, and subsequently departed from the United States to the same or another theater or country, and served an additional 1 month and 20 days, is entitled to one bar.

    All active duty or service outside CONUS (permanent, temporary, detached, and so forth) is included in computing
    length of service, provided that the official duty of the individual required his or her presence outside CONUS
     
  7. The septics have so many sgt. ranks because they operate on the McDonald's Management theory. Instead of giving raises/ responsibilty, they award titles . Any yank in the army for more than 2 years becomes some sort of sgt. Much like " Assistant Associate Fryers Manager- Night Shift". Because they prefer their soldiers to be narrowly trained automatons as opposed to the Brit/ Can. "thinking soldier" crosstrained model, this gives the illusion of advancement without the requisite ( and in their view, damgerous) increase in responsibilty.
     
  8. Flagrantviolator - you are so full of shite it is funny. The US Army has essentially 5 SGT NCO ranks.

    SGT E/5 is a Team Sgt UK equiv is Lance CPL
    Staff Sergeant E-6 is a Sqd leader UK equiv is a CPL
    Sergreant First Class E7 is a Plt SGT
    Master Sergeant E8 is a rank, First Sergeant E8 is an appointment. UK equiv is a WO2

    Sergeant Major E9 is a rank and Command Sergeant Major is an appointment. UK equiv is a WO1.

    The US Army WO ranks are notcomparable to any UK Army ranks, except the name.

    In nearly every case promtion times to the ranks, USA and UK are about the same. The difference being, on average, US soldiers have higher education than there UK counter-part. It is not unusual to find aUS Army NCO with a uni degree. Have you ever met an UK NCO who can claim that?

    Your comment equating US Army rank to Macdonalds workers is immature.
     
  9. Such horse-crap, tell them the truth. Those stripes are for every male soldier she's emasculated.
     
  10. One of My Sgt E-5 team leaders in 1997-2001 had a Masters degree and was well on his way to a Ph D. when he Left the service. He had been offered a Comission several times but he liked the idea of being a fire team leader, and was very good at small unit tactics. In the US Army at least , Points towards promotions are given for higher Civilian Education. At one time after the First Gulf War, Civvie degrees counted more than Actual Gallantry/Achievment decorations.

    http://armyawards.com/promo.shtml


    I may be wrong, but Flagrant Violator isnt British but a Canadian who has a chip on his shoulder about being a Snow Mexican......
     
  11. The Israelis are the ones who go really overboard on NCO ranks. In the IDF every soldier who succesfully completes 3 years of national service ends up as a sergeant or staff sergeant. However they have even more NCO ranks than than the US Army.

    http://orbat.com/site/ranks/israel_ranks.pdf

    You'll see they have sgt, staff sgt, sgt first class, 1st sgt, sgt maj, then WO and CWO, who are not US-style ones but more senior NCOs in the British fashion.