Typhoons down.

After what the original Typhoons did to the Wehrmacht post D-Day all the way to Berlin.

6 Sqn RAF were not known as the Flying Can openers for nothing.
Nobody I knew ever called them that. It was, is and will always be something else. ;-)
 
I remember many years ago reading a statistic that about 1% of rockets hit their targets, and estimating that a squadron of 12 Typhoons carrying eight rockets each might get one rocket on target.
Sufficiently accurate for train busting and also carried by Beaufighters for ship busting.
1561398149241.png

Caption: A gun camera picture of a rocket salvo, launched by a Hawker Typhoon towards railway wagons in a siding at Nordhorn, Germany (1945)

1561398252290.png


I would prefer not to be on the receiving end of the above. It looks accurate enough to scare the crap out of me!
 
No there was a ME 108 Taifun (Typhoon) and so you can't call the Taifun Taifun. They did the same with the Puma, first they would call it Panther, then they got cold feet and called it Igel (Hedgehog). After much trouble they called it Puma. I hope nobody told them that the SdKfZ 234/2 sometimes was called Puma or they will rename it to Pink fluffy Unicorns.
Well done Trigger!
 
The crash as said F-104 made a new crater in the German countryside made everyone duck....
 
slightly o/t - and condolences to the missing mens families - but weren't the rockets fired from Typhoons over normandy hideously inaccurate?
Shock & Awe - PSYOPs
 
Israelis [/B]and Italians, as well as the Luftwaffe from this unit again.


It should be an interesting pre flight briefing. " Listen in Flt Lt Cohen, on no account are you to engage Capt Goring in any air to air combat, not even in jest, Gentlemen, if you must insist on fighting old wars, behind the hangers, after the exercise."
 
I hope all are well.

Odd that the Beeb describe them as being from the 'German Armed Forces', that will be the Luftwaffe then- or does that leave them feeling uneasy?

Maybe they're still cross? From Wiki:


The BBC European Service moved into the South-East Wing of Bush House after bombs damaged Broadcasting House on 8 December 1940. The move was completed in 1941[7] and the BBC Overseas Service followed in 1958.[10] The BBC World Service occupied four wings of the building.[10]
In 1944 Bush House suffered external damage from a V-1 flying bomb.
[11]


Apparently the V1 blast sucked the mangled remains of some admin staff out of the windows and draped them in the trees outside.


Can't remember where I read that but it comes back to me every time I wander down past St. Clement's Danes to buy tea.
 

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