Type 2 Diabetes

I look at labels on food these days especially the Carb and sugar rating per 100g anything over 50 grams gets put back on the shelf, nearly all food has carbs just the amount varies

Archie

wife follows that guideline too.

Surprising how bad some things are though. she used to take those probiotic yogurt things, 33g in a tiny swig sized bottle!
 
Been Type 2 for about 3 years. Actually about 6 years but the doctors forgot to tell me for a couple of years.
Problem for me is I'm not fat enough apparently, my symptoms mean I should be heavily overweight and I'm not. I used to be but not for years.
Diabetes for me led to pretty massive weight loss.

Diabetic nurse specifically warned me off trying to treat it with low carb diet books and claims made by such. She reckoned that doing so would make me very ill.

Three years of screwing around with the medication hasn't helped a great deal, radical lifestyle changes haven't changed anything much either.
Over three years I've managed to redce my blood sugar from treble what it should be down to merely double.

I'm on three monthly reviews with the next in a couple of weeks
Weight loss will be partly down to diabetes, and if you're on stuff like Metformin that helps with weight loss
 

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
Think I'll go cold turkey with sweetners and give it a go.
Nowt to lose.
You'll find that you can then actually taste the tea or coffee and not the sugar, a lovely acquired taste. I gave up sugar in Flax street Mill where the cooks used to place whole bags of it into the tea urns. so much that the tea was actually sticky.
 
I can’t stand plain water if I can avoid it. Sparkling water with a squeeze of lime or there are some no carb, low calorie fizzy flavoured waters available.

Energy wise I’m ok, but then I’ve only been doing it since Monday. Plenty of reserves to work off.
Have you tried different brands of bottled water or getting a filter fitted to your mains? I hate the taste of Evian but can drink Volvic all day. Recently we had a softener fitted so the tap water tastes sh1t but the special filtered drinking tap is very nice and I'll happily quaff a pint while watching telly.
 
Weight loss will be partly down to diabetes, and if you're on stuff like Metformin that helps with weight loss

Weight loss was before Metformin.
Then they added another medication which put a little weight back on, they've changed that now and I'm losing again....
 
Been Type 2 for about 3 years. Actually about 6 years but the doctors forgot to tell me for a couple of years.
Problem for me is I'm not fat enough apparently, my symptoms mean I should be heavily overweight and I'm not. I used to be but not for years.
Diabetes for me led to pretty massive weight loss.

Diabetic nurse specifically warned me off trying to treat it with low carb diet books and claims made by such. She reckoned that doing so would make me very ill.

Three years of screwing around with the medication hasn't helped a great deal, radical lifestyle changes haven't changed anything much either.
Over three years I've managed to redce my blood sugar from treble what it should be down to merely double.

I'm on three monthly reviews with the next in a couple of weeks
Interesting that the nurse said low carb books would make you very ill. Whilst agreeing that the cranks out there should be avoided I'd suggest looking at the following link from Diabetes Community, Support, Education, Recipes & Resources which I've just searched for:

Dr Mosley highlighted Dr David Unwin’s research as a prime illustration of low carb’s benefits. Dr Unwin, a winner of the NHS Innovator of the Year award, has saved more than £38,000 a year on diabetes medications by helping patients who wish to follow low carb at his GP practice in Southport.

Dr Michael Mosley explains low carb benefits in new article - Diabetes

There's very good science behind it all, I'd not give something to my sister nor post on here had I not read further in the past. Of course you should consult with your GP/dietician but, the same as with Dr Mosely, caveat emptor. My current GP is excellent, I've had some of his professional opposites in the past.

Remember that medicine is conservative, for good reasons but this means it's very slow to change official guidelines and the the accepted treatments.

When I was on very strong antibiotics for months to treat osteomyelitis I used Google, lot less adverts and junk then, to find out about the shite things that were happening - which led me to buying probiotics. A funny thing in those days. The GP I saw (not my own, one from the practice) snorted and said "If it makes you feel better"

Had a long conversation with the consultant doing a colonoscopy on me last year, his dissertation and following papers all about probiotics, the large trust he works for prescribe them post surgery as they cut reinfection rates and improve recovery rates apparently. Saving money.
 
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Interesting that the nurse said low carb books would make you very ill. Whilst agreeing that the cranks out there should be avoided I'd suggest looking at the following link from Diabetes Community, Support, Education, Recipes & Resources which I've just searched for:

Dr Mosley highlighted Dr David Unwin’s research as a prime illustration of low carb’s benefits. Dr Unwin, a winner of the NHS Innovator of the Year award, has saved more than £38,000 a year on diabetes medications by helping patients who wish to follow low carb at his GP practice in Southport.

Dr Michael Mosley explains low carb benefits in new article - Diabetes

There's very good science behind it all, I'd not give something to my sister nor post on here had I not read further in the past. Of course you should consult with your GP/dietician but, the same as with Dr Mosely, caveat emptor. My current GP is excellent, I've had some of his professional opposites in the past.

Remember that medicine is conservative, for good reasons but this means it's very slow to change official guidelines and the the accepted treatments.

When I was on very antibiotics for months to treat osteomyelitis I used Google, lot less adverts and junk then, to find out about the shite things that were happening - which led me to buying probiotics. A funny thing in those days. The GP I saw (not my own, one from the practice) snorted and said "If it makes you feel better"

Had a long conversation with the consultant doing a colonoscopy on me last year, his dissertation and following papers all about probiotics, the large trust he works for prescribe them post surgery as they cut reinfection rates and improve recovery rates apparently. Saving money.

It is possible that part of the reason for the advice relates to other medical issues in combination with Diabetes
My digestive system isn't in great condition and I also suffer from condition called Achalasia which basically means I don't have a swallow reflex in my esophagus

Part of the complication with that is it often takes as long as 24 hours for food to reach my stomach (at its worst food stayed in the esophagus for over 48 hours before reaching the stomach) after eating
It makes balancing blood sugar with food very complicated, I'm never sure how long after eating it will change my blood sugar.
 

endure

GCM
Interesting that the nurse said low carb books would make you very ill. Whilst agreeing that the cranks out there should be avoided I'd suggest looking at the following link from Diabetes Community, Support, Education, Recipes & Resources which I've just searched for:

Dr Mosley highlighted Dr David Unwin’s research as a prime illustration of low carb’s benefits. Dr Unwin, a winner of the NHS Innovator of the Year award, has saved more than £38,000 a year on diabetes medications by helping patients who wish to follow low carb at his GP practice in Southport.

Dr Michael Mosley explains low carb benefits in new article - Diabetes

There's very good science behind it all, I'd not give something to my sister nor post on here had I not read further in the past. Of course you should consult with your GP/dietician but, the same as with Dr Mosely, caveat emptor. My current GP is excellent, I've had some of his professional opposites in the past.

Remember that medicine is conservative, for good reasons but this means it's very slow to change official guidelines and the the accepted treatments.

When I was on very antibiotics for months to treat osteomyelitis I used Google, lot less adverts and junk then, to find out about the shite things that were happening - which led me to buying probiotics. A funny thing in those days. The GP I saw (not my own, one from the practice) snorted and said "If it makes you feel better"

Had a long conversation with the consultant doing a colonoscopy on me last year, his dissertation and following papers all about probiotics, the large trust he works for prescribe them post surgery as they cut reinfection rates and improve recovery rates apparently. Saving money.

When I was first diagnosed I did what I always do when faced with a problem. I went out and researched it. My doc was worse than useless.

I found bloodsugar101 seemed to make the most sense in that it said to buy a meter and actually gather the data for my own body.

I spent three months testing morning and post prandially.

The tests showed that avoiding spuds, bread, pasta and rice made a huge difference to the results so I cut them out.

On my next visit to the diabetic nurse I told her I was low carbing. She got quite shirty until I pointed out that my results put me almost in the normal range.

There is no better indicator of the state of your diabetic health than hard numbers from a meter or you HbA1C.
 
wife follows that guideline too.

Surprising how bad some things are though. she used to take those probiotic yogurt things, 33g in a tiny swig sized bottle!
I have Benecol no added sugar (67.5g). It’s 6g of carbs.

Sometimes it’s a trade off with other health benefits. I suffer from hypertension, beetroot is good for hypertension, but is middling in carbs.
 
It is possible that part of the reason for the advice relates to other medical issues in combination with Diabetes
My digestive system isn't in great condition and I also suffer from condition called Achalasia which basically means I don't have a swallow reflex in my esophagus

Part of the complication with that is it often takes as long as 24 hours for food to reach my stomach (at its worst food stayed in the esophagus for over 48 hours before reaching the stomach) after eating
It makes balancing blood sugar with food very complicated, I'm never sure how long after eating it will change my blood sugar.
Always down to yourself how you manage your condition(s) but I'd say trying to introduce lower carb intake slowly is worth a bash.

Have you had surgical treatment for the Achalasia - pneumatic dilation, Heller myotomy or POEM? If not, can you ask for it? Kings College do POEM which has apparently good outcomes, especially in respect of post treatment chest pain. This is just Google fu stuff BTW, questions are rhetorical and am not trying to teach you to suck eggs but I'm a great believer in self managing treatment selection and lifestyle arising from conditions.
 
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I’ve even allowed cabbage into the house.
 
I was diagnosed as diabetic 20+ years ago and like a number of others quickly became a Diabetic Monk, not allowed to do this and this but must do this.. But after a year or so I threw away the Monk's Cassock and started to enjoy life again :) Within reason I eat what I like, I don't drink or smoke and take reasonable exercise, we have a Jack Russell who wants walking five times a day!. The wife does most of the cooking and as a retired District Nurse, is careful what she dishes up for me.. If my great grandson want to go into McDonalds for lunch I have no problem taking him :)
I have had to make some small changes at home, got hold of a small cupboard for exclusive use for my medication and test kit and commandeered the top shelf in the fridge for my Insulin..
 
Always down to yourself how you manage your condition(s) but I'd say trying to introduce lower carb intake slowly is worth a bash.

Have you had surgical treatment for the Achalasia - pneumatic dilation, Heller myotomy or POEM? If not, can you ask for it? Kings College do POEM which has apparently good outcomes, especially in respect of post treatment chest pain. This is just Google fu stuff BTW, questions are rhetorical and am not trying to teach you to suck eggs but I'm a great believer in self managing treatment selection and lifestyle arising from conditions.

Yes, dilation worked to a degree on the 6th attempt.

Next stage is open chest surgery so I'll hold out on that as long as I can.
Its manageable
I quit smoking, dropped sugar and reduce carb intake.

As I said, my blood sugar is now merely double what it should be.
Doctor did say 3 years ago that I may well end up on insulin despite being Type 2 because I'm not a typical Type 2 and she wasn't convinced Metformin etc would work

I guess I'll find out in a couple of weeks how I'm doing this quarter!
 
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You should embrace the cabbage - esp kimchi and sauerkraut
As a child cabbage in our house was the white stuff boiled to death leaving no flavour and horrible texture.
 
I had a packet of pork scratching today, perfectly allowed.

I feel dirty now though.
 
Zero. Beer is naughty. Red wine is ok. Chocolate at least 70% cacao is ok.
 

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