Two US Navy vessels collide in Strait of Hormuz

Discussion in 'Current Affairs, News and Analysis' started by KGB_resident, Mar 20, 2009.

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  1. New Orleans is practically brand new.
     
  2. Career firing...


    Career stops...
     
  3. Sounds about right. Septics, blue-on-blue. Why not involve the Navy as well? After all, they only seem to have had about 60 miles width to maneouvre in.

    MsG
     
  4. No they don't. The strait is about 35 miles (29 nautical miles) wide at it's most narrowest point. Take into consideration the fact that vessels have to transit through the TTW of Oman and Iran and the fact that they have to stick to within a traffic lane that isn't very wide (5 miles I seem to remember-give or take a slight percentage).

    Yes, they are mongs for colliding however, it occured at 0100am local time and without going into details that could breach OPSEC, it is perfectly feasible for a collision to take place whilst transiting the Strait at nighttime.
     
  5. HMS Southampton collided with a merchant ship in the Gulf some years back in broad daylight.
     
  6. Any motive behind these USN-related threads, Sergey?
     
  7. Sergey just likes trawling the internet looking for any stories that somehow put the US in a bad light and then posting links on here.
     
  8. Just speculation here but could the sub have been using the New Orleans as 'cover' to slip through the straights unnoticed?
     
  9. When you're using some of the most difficult to detect SSNs in the world (so hard to find they sometimes crash into each other), why would you want to have a great big warship follow it around; the SSN alone has a pretty good chance of staying undetected, whereas a warship is guaranteed to attract attention to that particular piece of sea, and possibly collide with your submarine (oops).

    Just a thought.
     
  10. What do you mean by this, Matelot? The question would seem to require an answer beginning with the standard British English: No, they didn't have ...
    In British English, either you use: "at its most narrow point", or; "at its narrowest point".

    Up to now, I've concentrated on very minor points of grammar, but the following represents serious questions:
    A traffic lane five miles wide is quite large, considering that your average very large vessel has a width of around 60 metres (about 200 foot) at best. So you're essentially saying that this neck of the (oceanic) woods, that's been sailed by folks for something like 9,000 years, was only detected to be a bit risky in the last ten years or so?

    That's rather a strange statement, since all the tonnage afloat in the world at the moment would comfortably fit across the narrowest part of the straits.

    Sounds about right for a typical blue-on-blue, if you ask me.

    MsG
     
  11. Andy, what 'a bad light' you speak about? It is almost insignificant incident especially in comparison with Kursk disaster and many other cases.

    Namely the British helped to save Russian small submarine. Yes, the British looked in a good light. As to the Russian then... accidents use to happen... alas.
     
  12. "When you're using some of the most difficult to detect SSNs in the world (so hard to find they sometimes crash into each other), why would you want to have a great big warship follow it around; the SSN alone has a pretty good chance of staying undetected, whereas a warship is guaranteed to attract attention to that particular piece of sea, and possibly collide with your submarine (oops)."

    IIRC the reason that they would use a ship to shadow is due to the magnetic signature of the submarine which is easier to hide when it travels beneath another (friendly) vessel. A narrow strait such as the one in Hormuz would make it pretty simple to detect a submarine (they aren't totally stealthy, as much money is spent on detection systems as on silencing them) entering or leaving the gulf.
     
  13. Fair enough. Are submarines still built with titanium, or are they mostly steel?
     
  14. The Hormuz TTS is 6 miles wide in total, but the individual lanes are only 2 miles wide. Given the number of ships transiting the strait at any particular time, however, the area for manouevring is even more limited that would suggest. Bear in mind that most vessels have a stopping distance and turning circle akin to a very large, heavy thing with a large stopping distance and turning circle.