Two drivers?

im just watching a program that includes a piece on the Churchill, with a crew of 5 it required two drivers.

Why did tanks of that era require two drivers? We're there any that didn't? Why not?
 
More understandable in the Centurion/Chieftain/Challenger era of BAOR when the driver was more likely to be shitfaced and a spare would have come in quite handy.
 
So from my fair question you still managed to fit up a member of the RAC with DD.

You must have excelled as a monkey.
 
im just watching a program that includes a piece on the Churchill, with a crew of 5 it required two drivers.

Why did tanks of that era require two drivers? We're there any that didn't? Why not?

Does that simply mean two trained drivers in the crew?

If I remember rightly, fro ma book, the WW1 tanks had separate operators for the steering. Hard to believe a WW2 tank needed two drivers to operate it.
 
OK, the piece mentioned two drivers, so it probably got it wrong. But I've heard two drivers mention for tanks before. Is it a common mistake?
 
Some M47s and the LVTP-5 Amtracs had the manual control lever in the central position so both drivers could use it. Also known as the Wobble Stick, it was a bit like a joystick handling steering and gear shifting.
m47pattonstick.jpg

m47pattondriver.jpg
 
I don't think many (any?) WW2 tanks needed a second driver to operate the tank, but the 2nd man was probably a hull gunner or back up to the primary driver. The recent film Fury had a co-driver up front in the Sherman who operated a machine gun but didn't do anything to actually drive the tank.
 

NSP

LE
The Irish-accented chap who does the videos for World of Tanks often refers to the "co-driver" when explaining WW2 tanks but then goes on to explain the details of the type of MG he'd be operating. Looking at some of the control layouts and operation, as he explains them, it looks like sometimes the driver having three hands would be useful so perhaps the "co-driver" is primarily the bow machine-gunner but can also reach over and throw switches/pull levers when the actual driver has a bit of an elevated workload going on, such as when trying to out-manoeuvre the enemy in combat...?
 
It was normal practice for crew members to have 2 trades for flexibility in crew mountings back in the day.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Some M47s and the LVTP-5 Amtracs had the manual control lever in the central position so both drivers could use it. Also known as the Wobble Stick, it was a bit like a joystick handling steering and gear shifting.
m47pattonstick.jpg

m47pattondriver.jpg

Although steering may be centrally mounted it would appear brakes and accelerator are purely on the driver's side.
 

NSP

LE
How's the hand-throttle/accelerator pedal arrangement work? As a layman who drives a modern car, engine rpm and acceleration are both controlled with the one pedal (in simple terms). How come tanks have two controls that, to those of us unfamiliar with the things, appear to serve the same purpose?
 
The Irish-accented chap who does the videos for World of Tanks often refers to the "co-driver" when explaining WW2 tanks but then goes on to explain the details of the type of MG he'd be operating. Looking at some of the control layouts and operation, as he explains them, it looks like sometimes the driver having three hands would be useful so perhaps the "co-driver" is primarily the bow machine-gunner but can also reach over and throw switches/pull levers when the actual driver has a bit of an elevated workload going on, such as when trying to out-manoeuvre the enemy in combat...?
Nick Moran, used to post here as California_Tanker.
 
How's the hand-throttle/accelerator pedal arrangement work? As a layman who drives a modern car, engine rpm and acceleration are both controlled with the one pedal (in simple terms). How come tanks have two controls that, to those of us unfamiliar with the things, appear to serve the same purpose?
Usually just to charge batteries, can be quite dangerous as a few CVRT dudes are probably aware.
 
How's the hand-throttle/accelerator pedal arrangement work? As a layman who drives a modern car, engine rpm and acceleration are both controlled with the one pedal (in simple terms). How come tanks have two controls that, to those of us unfamiliar with the things, appear to serve the same purpose?

Anything with a PTO will need revs that are independent of an accelerator. Also, I don't see a clutch or gearstick, so happen the 'accelerator' is more of a gears/clutch type arrangement to control speed while the throttle allows slow movement at full power to facilitate turret mobility.

That's my guess anyway.

If you think about it, helicopters work in a similar fashion, with power not being directly responsible for lift or movement.
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
Two guys up front was common in tanks of the era. Not two drivers; the guy not in the driver's seat had a full-time job as the radio op and an 'exciting times' role on the hull MG.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
I don't think many (any?) WW2 tanks needed a second driver to operate the tank, but the 2nd man was probably a hull gunner or back up to the primary driver. The recent film Fury had a co-driver up front in the Sherman who operated a machine gun but didn't do anything to actually drive the tank.
Whereas in the Firefly, the co-driver was mag-to-gridded to make room for the substantially larger 17pdr rounds, and still its load was meagre compared with the 75 tanks.

I suspect a similar argument to why they wont fit a one-piece-ammunition gun to CR2: it's simply the wrong shape for that size of ammo.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Not a tank but the AB41 armoured car had two drivers & steering wheels at each end.

But then it was Italian...
 

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