TV License - A Way Around it?

NSP

LE
Not only did I read it, I quoted it. Try reading your own post, muppet.

The one in which you say: ”Therefore the law compels you to tell TVL something, the outcome for not so-doing risks criminal prosecution.” in response to my comment (effectively saying @ScaleyAlbereto does not need to tell TVL that he doesn’t need a licence) that there is no law compelling anybody to tell TVL anything.“

here’s an aide memoir should you need it...

Forget the requirement to have a TV licence for certain activities, that is not contentious - just focus on your comment above and your assertion that the law compels people to tell TVL something or risk ‘criminal prosecution’
Let's look at the whole paragraph instead of taking a sentence out of context:-

"The law requires that you have a licence if you watch/record live TV or use iPlayer on wired or mains-powered devices. Therefore the law compels you to tell TVL something, the outcome for not so-doing risks criminal prosecution. "

I've bolded the bit you left out.

So, once more for the thick twat at the back of the class: in the stated circumstance the law compels you to tell TVL [by applying for a licence]. Ergo the law does in fact compel you to "talk to TV Licensing." If in the stated circumstance you do not apply for a licence you do in fact risk prosecution.

Got it...?
 
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Let's look at the whole paragraph instead of taking a sentence out of context:-

"The law requires that you have a licence if you watch/record live TV or use iPlayer on wired or mains-powered devices. Therefore the law compels you to tell TVL something, the outcome for not so-doing risks criminal prosecution. "

I've bolded the bit you left out.

So, once more for the thick twat at the back of the class: in the stated circumstance the law compels you to tell TVL [by applying for a licence]. Ergo the law does in fact compel you to "talk to TV Licensing." If in the stated circumstance you do not apply for a licence you do in fact risk prosecution.

Got it...?
The only thing I get here is that you are incredibly stupid. The original point was not needing to tell TVL that you don’t need a licence. Read the post again.

Does the law require anybody to tell DVLA that they don’t need a licence? Does the law require you to actually speak to TVL about anything. (beyond actually buying a licence... yawn).

Here’s a bit more of your nonsense...

Once again, for the hard of thinking, you cannot legally be without a licence if you watch live TV or the iPlayer, or stream BBC content on another operator's service (so no watching Top Gear on Netflix).
Why can’t I watch BBC content on another operators on-demand service without a licence?
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
You only need to inform them if you are ceasing to pay the TVL and sign the declaration however they say they will check on you within 2 years!
Bring it on


Eta they ask you to do this to save them bothering you with letters and visits, it’s not necessary but makes for a quiet life
 

NSP

LE
The only thing I get here is that you are incredibly stupid. The original point was not needing to tell TVL that you don’t need a licence. Read the post again.
No, the original point was that no-one is obliged to "talk to TVL," which is clearly not the case as I have repeatedly demonstrated.

Why can’t I watch BBC content on another operators on-demand service without a licence?
Keep up. That post was edited at 21:18. You posted this at 00:09 quoting the pre-edited version. You must be very slow or have a very empty life.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
No, the original point was that no-one is obliged to "talk to TVL," which is clearly not the case as I have repeatedly demonstrated.
In a way you are right, however you can ignore them as the burden of proof sits with the prosecution. The formal way is to notify them which gets you a two year break from letters etc.
The means of informing them is to follow guidance on the rear of the reminder forms and electronically declare online that you no longer require a license.
 

windswept398

Old-Salt
When I rented my flat before I got a house, not once did I pay for a licence.

Seriously, those TV detector van guys must be a threat to you in Englandistan but up here, on the right side of Hadrian's wall, they dont bother us.

Probably cause we like to eat our own kids.
 

NSP

LE
In a way you are right, however you can ignore them as the burden of proof sits with the prosecution. The formal way is to notify them which gets you a two year break from letters etc.
The means of informing them is to follow guidance on the rear of the reminder forms and electronically declare online that you no longer require a license.
I know - I did it when my last one ran out last year, as I know longer watch anything other than Netflix, Prime and BluRay/DVD now "proper" Top Gear is on Prime instead of BBC2.

However if you need a licence, and get one, they also leave you in peace. Can't think why...
 
When I rented my flat before I got a house, not once did I pay for a licence.

Seriously, those TV detector van guys must be a threat to you in Englandistan but up here, on the right side of Hadrian's wall, they dont bother us.

Probably cause we like to eat our own kids.
The TV detector van was just a story, they use to do it by a list of names that the shops had to give them when someone bought a TV and/or if the house had previously a licence.
 
The TV detector van was just a story, they use to do it by a list of names that the shops had to give them when someone bought a TV and/or if the house had previously a licence.
I reckon that the TV detector vans were used and probably could do more or less what they said they could - up until about the 1990s. After that, the increase in density of sets, and changes in receiver technology would almost certainly make them impractical.
And, yes, I think the primary method of enforcement has always been the LASSY database since it was introduced.
 
I reckon that the TV detector vans were used and probably could do more or less what they said they could - up until about the 1990s. After that, the increase in density of sets, and changes in receiver technology would almost certainly make them impractical.
And, yes, I think the primary method of enforcement has always been the LASSY database since it was introduced.
Except they couldn't*. Database then sneaking about, looking in windows, cold calling* an area, and watching for TV screens casting light on curtains was how they did it back then to.

Coupled with fake authority and low level intimidation.

Somebody once told me that 14sigs borrowed one once for some reason in the 80s and it couldn't find a TV in a cardboard crate in the middle of an empty car park.
 
Except they couldn't*. Database then sneaking about, looking in windows, cold calling* an area, and watching for TV screens casting light on curtains was how they did it back then to.

Coupled with fake authority and low level intimidation.

Somebody once told me that 14sigs borrowed one once for some reason in the 80s and it couldn't find a TV in a cardboard crate in the middle of an empty car park.
Interesting. I assume that 14 Sigs thought to turn it on? It's a bit surprising, because the LO from a 1980s TV set could normally be detected from dozens of meters with nothing more than a coathanger and an oscilloscope.
 
Interesting. I assume that 14 Sigs thought to turn it on? It's a bit surprising, because the LO from a 1980s TV set could normally be detected from dozens of meters with nothing more than a coathanger and an oscilloscope.
I assumed they found out the van was full of fake kit and an advertising exercise,
 

arfah

LE
”There are a number of websites that campaign against the TV licence.
The BBC monitors the internet for references to TV Licensing.”

BigBrotherConspiracy
 

Fake Sheikh

War Hero
Ditch the TV!
Or just have a TV with internal Blu Ray player & watch that way.

To be honest having to pay for TV is still like paying for a licence.
SKY a complete rip off, Invest in a PURE DAB+ Radio the best you can buy.

I look at tv at work & then go home and watch a blu ray or DAB radio.
 
A friend of mine, a former BBC technical employee once told me that "The TV Detector Van was the Corporation's greatest ever work of fiction."

Confirmed by a relative of mine, too, also ex-BBC Tech.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
A friend of mine, a former BBC technical employee once told me that "The TV Detector Van was the Corporation's greatest ever work of fiction."

Confirmed by a relative of mine, too, also ex-BBC Tech.
Oddly enough according to someone I have no reason to doubt it was run by the Post Office staff originally and he claimed it worked but they kept breaking it!
 
Except they couldn't*. Database then sneaking about, looking in windows, cold calling* an area, and watching for TV screens casting light on curtains was how they did it back then to.

Coupled with fake authority and low level intimidation.

Somebody once told me that 14sigs borrowed one once for some reason in the 80s and it couldn't find a TV in a cardboard crate in the middle of an empty car park.
I sneaked a peek in one parked in a petrol station near Bristol in 1992. It was a Sherpa with various antennae attached to the roof. Inside was......the standard bench seats and nothing else.
 
I sneaked a peek in one parked in a petrol station near Bristol in 1992. It was a Sherpa with various antennae attached to the roof. Inside was......the standard bench seats and nothing else.
I bet the one that 14sigs got was the same, and the Tempest team were told not to tell anyone.
 

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