Turkey makes full apology to Russia for downing Russian jet, seeks new relationship

#1
Vladimir Putin has received a letter in which Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan apologized for the death of the Russian pilot who was killed when a Russian jet was downed over the Syrian-Turkish border last November, the Kremlin said. Erdogan expressed readiness to restore relations with Moscow, Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said on Monday.

“We never had a desire or a deliberate intention to down an aircraft belonging to Russia,”
the letter read, according to a statement published on the Kremlin website. According to the statement, Erdogan’s letter stressed that “the Turkish side undertook all the risks and made a great effort to recover the body of the Russian pilot from the Syrian opposition, bringing it to Turkey. The organization of the pre-burial procedures was conducted in accordance with all religious and military procedures.”

Erdogan said that Turkey "shares the pain of downed Su-24 pilot's death with his family" and "sees it as Turkey's pain",

The address by the Turkish leader also informed that a criminal investigation has been launched against the person suspected of killing the Russian pilot, Alparslan Celik, the Kremlin said. In addition, Erdogan expressed readiness to tackle security challenges in the region and fight terrorism together with Moscow

Erdogan Apologizes To Putin Over Death Of Russian Pilot, Calls Russia "Friend", Restores Ties With Israel | Zero Hedge

Well well well, looks like the Neo Ottomans are back peddling like fury...

@KGB_resident
 
Last edited:
#2
Turkey makes friends with Israel again after Gaza, Turkey now trying to make friends with Russia again.

I sense Erdogan has a plan.
 
#3
@Maple
I recall crossing swords over this, thought it may be of interest to you.
 
#4
It may be more to do with the fact that (according to an article I read last week), Turkish holiday resorts are seeing about 10% of their normal bookings for this time of year. Partly to do with reduction in western tourists through jihadimaniacophobia, but much more severely through absence of Russians courtesy of Putins travel ban. He clearly wants his tourist trade (any tourist trade!) back.

Of course, given ongoing energy prices and the EU/US sanctions on Russia triggered by Crimea, whether the Russ will have any bunce to spend is another question......
 
#6
It may be more to do with the fact that (according to an article I read last week), Turkish holiday resorts are seeing about 10% of their normal bookings for this time of year. Partly to do with reduction in western tourists through jihadimaniacophobia, but much more severely through absence of Russians courtesy of Putins travel ban. He clearly wants his tourist trade (any tourist trade!) back.

Of course, given ongoing energy prices and the EU/US sanctions on Russia triggered by Crimea, whether the Russ will have any bunce to spend is another question......
I suspect you are right.
 
#8
It may be more to do with the fact that (according to an article I read last week), Turkish holiday resorts are seeing about 10% of their normal bookings for this time of year. Partly to do with reduction in western tourists through jihadimaniacophobia, but much more severely through absence of Russians courtesy of Putins travel ban. He clearly wants his tourist trade (any tourist trade!) back.

Of course, given ongoing energy prices and the EU/US sanctions on Russia triggered by Crimea, whether the Russ will have any bunce to spend is another question......
Actually, from what I've heard, holiday bookings for Turkey went down 40% from Germany due to the political situation. The airline I work for used to fly mainly to Turkey, Egypt and the UAE, but is now concentrating on Western Europe (Spain, Italy, Croatian coast etc.).
 
#9
A friend has had a holiday flat in in Turkey (south coast some place, no idea where) for some time. Her kids have grown up going there and they spent most school holiday there. The Kids have now reached the age when they can travel and spend time there on their own. The local bar owner and family keep an eye out and on the occasions when some of the not so local youth were pestering her daughter (county swimmer, blond and very pretty, and don't bother asking) warned them off.

Over the last year or so they have seen an increase in problems with the police and council over tourists drinking and being seen by locals. The bar owner has had to put up screens so that the tourists will not offend some of the locals. It has gone from a very nice holiday destination to one they no longer feel happy with.

Turkey needs to decide what it wants. Tone down the anti west or have empty holiday hotels.
 
#10
A friend has had a holiday flat in in Turkey (south coast some place, no idea where) for some time. Her kids have grown up going there and they spent most school holiday there. The Kids have now reached the age when they can travel and spend time there on their own. The local bar owner and family keep an eye out and on the occasions when some of the not so local youth were pestering her daughter (county swimmer, blond and very pretty, and don't bother asking) warned them off.

Over the last year or so they have seen an increase in problems with the police and council over tourists drinking and being seen by locals. The bar owner has had to put up screens so that the tourists will not offend some of the locals. It has gone from a very nice holiday destination to one they no longer feel happy with.

Turkey needs to decide what it wants. Tone down the anti west or have empty holiday hotels.
There are many Turks who are not happy with Erdogan, either because they don't support his authoritarian and Islamist streak, or because they belong to one ethnic or religious minority, of which there are some quite big ones. IMO, if he is not careful, he might have a civil war in his country.

It sounds as if the bar owner's family has in a way adopted the kids and protects them as if they were their own. Very family oriented people.
 
#12
I am sure that President Putin is allowing Turkey to do this at almost no cost :lol: ;-)
 

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
#13
It may be more to do with the fact that (according to an article I read last week), Turkish holiday resorts are seeing about 10% of their normal bookings for this time of year. Partly to do with reduction in western tourists through jihadimaniacophobia, but much more severely through absence of Russians courtesy of Putins travel ban. He clearly wants his tourist trade (any tourist trade!) back.

Of course, given ongoing energy prices and the EU/US sanctions on Russia triggered by Crimea, whether the Russ will have any bunce to spend is another question......
Yup, also tear gas 'rubber bullets' on gay pride protestors after they banned it.
Unlucky, random bombs, can't keep tourists safe, lose cash.
 
#15
Getting Ivan Ivanovich to return to Turkey as a tourist even after Erdogan has given Putin's shoes a good shine on the steps of the Kremlin on National TV, is still going to be a stretch. Those that do go I am sure will only be of the very highest quality with their hearts filled with the forgiveness and benevolence towards recent, underhand foes, for which Russians are rightly famed.
 
#16
Erdogan’s brand of diplomacy. Shoot first, get the consequences, then grovel in humble mortification.

Putin probably wouldn’t p*ss on him if was on fire, but given suitable incentives may eventually consider the situation. His tit for tat sanctions with Europe and the West left his nose looking a tad snub.
 
#17
Erdogan despite appearing to want to now chin off the ungrateful two faced EU and especially his mate Dave, will no doubt still want some money for stopping, all and sundry use his beaches as a embarkation point towards Grey Line Funnels, or the package holiday for the passportless in the paradise of Lesbos.

Still he has so many faces already, so turning a new one back towards Putin is a no brainer, for an opportunist. Turkey is feeling the loss of Russia's Largess.
 
#18
Turkey has a plan B. If they don't get into the EU they will cosy up to Putin.

That will, of course eventually backfire when Russia takes over Turkey by force. It may just happen that all those handsome young men who are holidaying in Turkey just happen to be Russian soldiers ready to pull a coup d'etat
 
#19
One of Churchills follies.

The Dardanelles, a narrow 60-mile-long strip of water that divides Europe from Asia, has been of great strategic significance for centuries. Carefully secured by international treaty, it was the closing of the Dardanelles that eventually brought the Ottoman Empire into the war as a German ally at the end of October 1914.

By late 1914, movement on the Western Front had ground to a halt. Some Allied leaders suggested opening new fronts to break the deadlock, shorten the war and avoid heavier loss of life. Soon after the start of the new year, Great Britain and France attempted to force the Dardanelles and attack Constantinople (now Istanbul), the capital of the Ottoman Empire.

Many in Britain, notably the First Lord of the Admiralty, Winston Churchill, believed that knocking the Ottomans out of the war would undermine Germany. They theorised that as a result of this attack, Britain and France would be able to help their weakest partner, Russia; that the Suez Canal and Britain’s Middle Eastern oil interests would be secured; and that undecided Balkan states, including Bulgaria and Greece, would join the Allied side. It was an exciting and alluring proposition. But it was based on the mistaken belief that the Ottomans were weak and could easily be overcome.

On 19 February 1915, British and French ships began a naval assault on the Dardanelles. The fighting culminated in a heavy setback for the Allies on 18 March due to large losses from Turkish mines. Military landings on the Gallipoli peninsula followed on 25 April. Contained by the Ottoman defenders, a new assault began on 6 August. Each fresh attempt was defeated, and by mid-January 1916, all Allied troops had been evacuated and the attack on the Dardanelles abandoned.

For the Ottomans, it was a major achievement. The Allies succeeded only in attrition, killing thousands of Ottoman soldiers. Even this exacted a high price; total casualties for the campaign were more than half a million. The Dardanelles campaign remains one of the First World War’s most controversial episodes.

NATO will not want Turkey siding with Russia for sure.
 
#20
NATO will not want Turkey siding with Russia for sure.
Agreed but NATO has shot its bold ref the Turks, also the 'West' being the EU & USA (especially under Trump) have no appetite for a non Ataturk version of the place, and quite rightly so. So nothing to do other than get sensible and hope that after a lot of grovelling and concessions Russia sponsors membership of the far more appropriate (given Turkey's culture & Geographical position ) Shanghai Cooperation Organisation.

As Istanbul is one terminus of the new Silk Road, China would be delighted.

Aint current affairs at the moment great! I cannot be arrsed to watch or read fiction these days - far to simplistic to be believable...
 

Latest Threads

Top