Turkey - a real turkey?

#81
You are correct, the Turks are simply a lead country in their state of technology and weapon production in the Islamic military alliance.
Turkey is not a member of the GCC, so I ask again, what 'Islamic military alliance'?
 
#82
Given that the level of debt in most countries now exceeds that before the Lehman crash, I suspect we're one financial shock away from a recession. Turkey might supply that shock.

That might trigger a few Spanish banks going under, which in turn would put pressure on the eurozone. If Italian interest rates start to rise as investors take fright at the level of Italian debt and the forthcoming spending splurge, the ECB has a real problem on its hands.

Wordsmith
I'm not sure that we would be looking at the same situation as 2008. The associated financial bubble is not as widely spread in the stronger economies as it was last time. It would be a hit to the global economy, but perhaps not as severe this time around.

Quite possibly what we may see this time is the weaker economies being forced out of the euro as liquidity and revenue dries up. This would let them devalue, which is what their economies need most at this time.

However, that may trigger a chain reaction of exits from the next most weakest countries as speculators put pressure on them in turn.
 
#85
Lifting the sanctions which caused the current run, halted by what Bolton has just said, won’t stop the current run? Okay....

What is it you say about ‘doing some more reading’? Try hosting AWACS in Konya for anti IS Ops, or their troop numbers in Afghanistan, or them meeting the 2% or even hosting the NATO centre for CT for starters.

I read plenty thanks. If you can’t support your argument, you only need to say so.
If you had taken the trouble you would have seen that the comment was withdrawn for it’s flippancy.
 
#86
If you had taken the trouble you would have seen that the comment was withdrawn for it’s flippancy.
I don’t get notified of your edits, but I note the amendment without saying it’s been amended.
 

Wordsmith

LE
Book Reviewer
#88
Quite possibly what we may see this time is the weaker economies being forced out of the euro as liquidity and revenue dries up. This would let them devalue, which is what their economies need most at this time.

However, that may trigger a chain reaction of exits from the next most weakest countries as speculators put pressure on them in turn.
I'd agree with you on that one. However, there is no legal way to exit the euro. Giving rise to the interesting spectacle of eurozone countries that had defaulted on their debts to other eurozone countries remaining locked into a currency union that legally does not anticipate its member states defaulting.

There's enough ramifications there to keep entire regiments of lawyers in expensive and gainful employment for decades to come.

Wordsmith
 
#89
Spoon feeding...big lad now.
Indeed. There’s a ‘preview’ button that shows what you will post. A lot of the adults use it.
 
#90
Interesting article.

Turkey’s Losing Economic War

This is very reminiscent of Greece, Italy, Ireland, etc before the Lehman crisis. A mountain of unsold property that turned out to be worthless when the Lehman crash arrived and royally trashed the balance sheets of banks who'd financed the building spree.


There is a huge financial bubble in Turkey. When it bursts, Turkey will be deep in a financial crisis.

Specific banks in France, Spain and Italy are heavily exposed to Turkish debt, so I can see banking failures in the EU as well.

Wordsmith
The sky still falling on the EU? Are you there yet?
 
#92
#94
I'm not sure that we would be looking at the same situation as 2008. The associated financial bubble is not as widely spread in the stronger economies as it was last time. It would be a hit to the global economy, but perhaps not as severe this time around.

Quite possibly what we may see this time is the weaker economies being forced out of the euro as liquidity and revenue dries up. This would let them devalue, which is what their economies need most at this time.

However, that may trigger a chain reaction of exits from the next most weakest countries as speculators put pressure on them in turn.
Contagion's a funny old thing and yer man is oblivious to the ripple effect and indirect contagion in particular. He wishes disaster on others so he can say "I told you so" without being aware of how integrated it all is.
 
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#96
The wild hair in your twisted knickers is giving you serious grief?
Clearly you can’t guess. However, keep flailing, you’ll get there.
 
#97
Your Erdogan complex to keep going no matter what?

Go on be a sport, give us some more clues just what it is that impels you to persist. :)
 
#98
Your Erdogan complex to keep going no matter what?
Pot DE Kettle. You’ll also have to show me where I’ve ever said a positive thing about Erdogan.
Go on be a sport, give us some more clues
Your ‘complex’ started with an ‘assumed knowledge’ that ‘I need to read more’. You realised what you’d posted was wrong, that Turkey isn’t ‘the leader of it’s military alliance’. and edited your comment about reading. You then try to pull me up for not realising you’d edited your comment. You then posted some childish phrases.

As for your additional edit:
just what it is that impels you to persist. :)
Just pointing out the obvious thanks.
 
@Resai
@scalieback

Please don't ruin this thread. There are so many good threads derailed already. You both have great insight in to what is a potentially huge problem on a few fronts. I enjoy reading both your input so please keep it up.
 

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