Tunisia Roman sites by Road

Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer
a friend took me there for a free holiday 30 odd years ago - he was doing a security review for something or other and booked me down as his assistant which was cool 600 quid and a free holiday at the hotel sahara beach complex.

the reason tunisia never had a terrorist attack until recently was because all the waiters and bar staff were PLO soldiers who kept everything at bay.

I though the place was ace although a bit odd with it's closed currency as I'd never come across that before outside of scotland.
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
@OneTenner of the vehicles shown above which was the most suited for desert driving…on n off road.
It's a trade-off, on the face of it the Jap (Mitsubishi?) one should do better because it has bigger tyres, which can be aired down to give a bigger footprint so less times getting stuck, it's also got a long wheelbase so better overall handling on & off road. in reality, underpowered, too heavy and auto box.
The 90 Should be better - it's lighter, better power to weight ratio but in sand the short wheelbase lets it down, if the front wheels lose grip, there's little chance of regaining it before the rear wheels end up in the same sand. Not great on road over distances. The 110 has better road & sand capability together with better carrying capacity but still has beam axles like all of the above so is still compromised, the traction control is best disabled for sand as it does a good job of stopping forward motion in difficult terrain.
Discovery 3 - on road - superb. off road, pretty good, power to weight similar to Defender, better assistance systems, air suspension & wishbone suspension help massively, the only downside is it's weight, which contributes to sinking into sand more than it should.
Couple of points on all the vehicles:-
Desert driving, it's not 'if' you get stuck, it's 'when'.
Expect at least two punctures and plan accordingly, deserts are not just sand. aired-down tyres will suffer on the sidewalls.
All the vehicles pictured above except the 90 have far too much on the roof, raising the centre of gravity quite a bit
Road tyres are better in sand than 'offroad' tyres, i used to run Pirelli ATR's all year round, apart from seriously muddy jobs where I'd run Goodyear MT/R's.

Gratuitous Morocco pictures
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OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
a friend took me there for a free holiday 30 odd years ago - he was doing a security review for something or other and booked me down as his assistant which was cool 600 quid and a free holiday at the hotel sahara beach complex.

the reason tunisia never had a terrorist attack until recently was because all the waiters and bar staff were PLO soldiers who kept everything at bay.

I though the place was ace although a bit odd with it's closed currency as I'd never come across that before outside of scotland.
Tunisia is / was a place that felt to be well policed, I used to carry a list of passport number. names, VRN's and (rough) destinations to give out at the VCP's - these were mainly so they could check on you moving through rather thanmseeing what you were up to. In Tunis, we used to stop at a hotel opposite the minisdtry of funny walks or something, as they had armed guards there was no problem with kids messing with the cars. I was last there in 2010, there was no hint of what was coming, the Tunisians I came into contact with certainly didn't want change on the scale that resulted. I've still got about 600 Dinar, technically not supposed to be taken out of the country, I 'forgot' it was in the vehicle safe.... ;)
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
Couple more, this is the 'lost city' in Morocco

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This is what happens when enthusiasm exceeds ability

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OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
Overview of a ten-day Tunisia route
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I'd love to do that again!
 

Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer

Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer
Tunisia is / was a place that felt to be well policed, I used to carry a list of passport number. names, VRN's and (rough) destinations to give out at the VCP's - these were mainly so they could check on you moving through rather thanmseeing what you were up to. In Tunis, we used to stop at a hotel opposite the minisdtry of funny walks or something, as they had armed guards there was no problem with kids messing with the cars. I was last there in 2010, there was no hint of what was coming, the Tunisians I came into contact with certainly didn't want change on the scale that resulted. I've still got about 600 Dinar, technically not supposed to be taken out of the country, I 'forgot' it was in the vehicle safe.... ;)
I went their on a family holiday in the early 80s when I was 11, my dad got well pissed when he was short changed.

the old brit 10p was the same size as a dinar coin.

mind you we got a honeydew melon the size of a medicine ball for a quid so I thought we did okay in the end,
 
When I left the Army in the late '90s I worked for a while in 3 countries in which the Soviet military had been fighting previously. The Soviet remnants of war were fascinating, and sometimes rather macabre.
Tales of which are probably worthy of their own thread?

It’s things like that the make arrse worthwhile...
 

Oyibo

LE
Tales of which are probably worthy of their own thread?

It’s things like that the make arrse worthwhile...
As a sort of bridge between this thread and Soviet stuff, perhaps a tale from Abkhazia in the late '90s:

I was managing a mine and UXO clearance project and went to meet the president Vladislav Ardzinba, to get approval to clear 'explosive remnants of war' in some contentious areas.

We met in his grand, yet austere, offices, each of us armed with our interpreters. He was very, very enthusiastic. As the conversation developed (with my interpreter pedantically correcting his) he explained how he was very keen on archaeology and how digging for mines from a war was very similar. I found out after that he was a notable historian of ancient civilisations.

The guy was barking mad, but ye Gods we had some sort of bond in that meeting - I'd have loved to go on the piss with him, but that wasn't really an option in Abkhazia in those days.

And he gave me some of his Presidential Guard to protect the compound I was building and told his head of security, "If he [me] dies, I will have all of you executed".

If you want a trip to a strange ex-Soviet Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic, Abkhazia's your place. Stalin's and Gorbachev's dachas can be visited, and the 'Party' resorts for the 'faithful' have apparently had the bullet strikes filled in. And it's the first place I saw a T90, and further south an operational Russian airborne brigade (and talked to the evil shit of a brigadier).
 

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