Trying to identify a particular soldiers unit from ID tags

wireless_barf

War Hero
Hi All,

I have been researching a now demolished local camp site, and have discovered two ID tags. I can find no documents relating to this site anywhere, so am hoping to be able to narrow down the search using these tags, and the one other item of evidence I have from the site so far - an RAOC button! These were all found during metal detector searches of the site.

The Forces War Records website gives me 9 possibilities for one name, and none for the other. It seems that unless your a paid up member it doesnt search service numbers properly! The cost of membership is beyond my available means at present.

The two tags I have are 22977655 Busby and 22889789 Clair. No initials on either, the only other info is religion. From what I can gather both these were issued sometime between July 1951 and June 1955.

If I could narrow one or both down to a single person, and hence hopefully their outfit, I would have some starting point with regimental archives etc to gain more info on the users of the site.

Can anyone help me narrow these two down, and perhaps even obtain a record?

Cheers
Martin
 

smeg-head

ADC
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
I had quite a fright reading your post as I thought the first person you was describing was a certain socialist oirishman of our acquaintance. Then I realised, if he was 8 when he joined in the sixties, this must be his father's dog tags before he was topped by the British Army.
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
Where was the site?

That would seem a better starting point.
 

wireless_barf

War Hero
The site is an old camp near Selby, North Yorkshire, now mostly covered with a golf course and a bypass. I cant find any documentation that even mentions a camp here, only annecdotal evidence of the old 'army camp', and where it appears as camp (dis) on old OS maps. No official name I can find, and any and all combinations of local area and village names fail to throw up any official documents.

Without a proper name for the camp ive nothing to go on with forces archives other than "camp near selby", if I can narrow down the tags to a particular unit I can go to their archives and search for anything related to the area.
 

_Chimurenga_

LE
Gallery Guru
According to the volume British Army Uniforms & Insignia of World War Two, a soldier was assigned a 7 or 8 digit number according to which corps or regiment he was initially assigned. He would keep this number regardless of any subsequent transfer or posting.

They ranged from 1 to 294,000 for the RASC and topped out at 16,000,001 to 16,100,000 for the REME.

Oddly enough, the author of this book, Brian L. Davis served in the Life Guards from 1953-57 and his service number was 22556450, which leads me to conclude that the 8 digit service number was introduced after the Second World War and the numbers commenced from 16,100,001 onwards.
 
The site is an old camp near Selby, North Yorkshire, now mostly covered with a golf course and a bypass. I cant find any documentation that even mentions a camp here, only annecdotal evidence of the old 'army camp', and where it appears as camp (dis) on old OS maps. No official name I can find, and any and all combinations of local area and village names fail to throw up any official documents.

Without a proper name for the camp ive nothing to go on with forces archives other than "camp near selby", if I can narrow down the tags to a particular unit I can go to their archives and search for anything related to the area.
Not sure this is any use but: There is an old WW2 RAF airfield (RAF Burn at Selby) which is now used by a gliding club. During WW2 it was a bomber airfield but just after 1946 it became a RASC Armoured vehicle storage depot (No14 AFV Depot), up until the late 50's. Although this is a few miles from the golf course.

Not sure if you are referring to the Golf course by the A63 of off Gateforth New Road (joy of Google mapping) I cannot find anything about that area.
 
No.14 Armoured Fighting Vehicle Depot (A.F.V.D.), Burn, Selby Yorkshire Former RAF Burn airfield. Precise location not identified.

Thomas Street Camp, Selby Yorkshire Precise location not identified.

Also mention of a camp at Barlow
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
Last edited:

wireless_barf

War Hero
No.14 Armoured Fighting Vehicle Depot (A.F.V.D.), Burn, Selby Yorkshire Former RAF Burn airfield. Precise location not identified.

Thomas Street Camp, Selby Yorkshire Precise location not identified.

Also mention of a camp at Barlow
The Burn depot was right in the middle of the runways. Ive had discussions about it with the Glider club, they occasionally grub up the odd mortar...

Never heard of the Thomas Street camp, thats one to take a look into. Ive heard of Barlow, apparently that was quite big, and the railway sidings were in use for it. Possibly a transit camp.
 

wireless_barf

War Hero
B/Lad your spot on, almost! The mushroom farm it seems was the site of another camp, No. 53 PoW working camp, known as Sandbeds, from '45 -'48. This is what I originally thought my site was, but further research suggests it was the 'shroom farm, which is marked as a County Agricultural Executive Committee hostel on old maps, presumably what it became once it was no longer deemed correct to call the now naturalised ex-PoWs PoWs! Its seems many of them decided not to be repatriated, in fact at least one married a local farm lass.

MY site is in fact the top right of the golf course, where the bypass cuts across. Much of what would have been the camp is now the driving range
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
B/Lad your spot on, almost! The mushroom farm it seems was the site of another camp, No. 53 PoW working camp, known as Sandbeds, from '45 -'48. This is what I originally thought my site was, but further research suggests it was the 'shroom farm, which is marked as a County Agricultural Executive Committee hostel on old maps, presumably what it became once it was no longer deemed correct to call the now naturalised ex-PoWs PoWs! Its seems many of them decided not to be repatriated, in fact at least one married a local farm lass.

MY site is in fact the top right of the golf course, where the bypass cuts across. Much of what would have been the camp is now the driving range
I presume you know one of those two hills is called Brayton Barff?

Our village had a Romanian POW who married a local and stayed. Nice bloke, very big and strong.
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
B/Lad your spot on, almost! The mushroom farm it seems was the site of another camp, No. 53 PoW working camp, known as Sandbeds, from '45 -'48. This is what I originally thought my site was, but further research suggests it was the 'shroom farm, which is marked as a County Agricultural Executive Committee hostel on old maps, presumably what it became once it was no longer deemed correct to call the now naturalised ex-PoWs PoWs! Its seems many of them decided not to be repatriated, in fact at least one married a local farm lass.

MY site is in fact the top right of the golf course, where the bypass cuts across. Much of what would have been the camp is now the driving range
To add.

Excellent. It is half a century ago, so my recollections are not perfect.
 

wireless_barf

War Hero
I do indeed! My full surname is Barfield. Theres a Barfield road in Burn, and a Bar Field House in my village!

None of which is in anyway connected with my family - we come from Donny!
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
I do indeed! My full surname is Barfield. Theres a Barfield road in Burn, and a Bar Field House in my village!

None of which is in anyway connected with my family - we come from Donny!
I've a nephew in Burn.

Not been to Donny for a while but had a meal in The Royal in Norton 3 weeks ago.
 

wireless_barf

War Hero
So, can anyone help with the tags at all?

Surely there must be a way to get at least some useful info - we have two service numbers, how can I find the soldier and his/her unit(s)?
 

1&12

LE
According to the volume British Army Uniforms & Insignia of World War Two, a soldier was assigned a 7 or 8 digit number according to which corps or regiment he was initially assigned. He would keep this number regardless of any subsequent transfer or posting.

They ranged from 1 to 294,000 for the RASC and topped out at 16,000,001 to 16,100,000 for the REME.

Oddly enough, the author of this book, Brian L. Davis served in the Life Guards from 1953-57 and his service number was 22556450, which leads me to conclude that the 8 digit service number was introduced after the Second World War and the numbers commenced from 16,100,001 onwards.
The 8 digit service numbering system kicked off in 1950, starting with 22000000.
They weren't allocated to any particular unit as such but issued as next batch of unused numbers to whichever needed them.
It is possible to roughly date such numbers but its not always straight forward, eg 24304### were being issued to the 3 regiments of the Depot The Queens Div in 1972 whilst only a few weeks before 2428xxxx or 2429xxxx numbers were issued to a RA TA regiment in London.
Presumably RA TA regiments weren't churning out recruits at the rate 9 regular battalions and TA bns of Queens Div were.
 
Thread starter Similar threads Forum Replies Date
Stonker The Book Club 11
foxs_marine Medals 5
M Medals 10

New Posts

Latest Threads

Top