Truck Porn

Truxx

LE
I'm sure I've seen the same Chassis makeup with a searchlight on
Would make sense as barrage balloons and search lights seem to have been a thing.

I had never really thought about the organisation, command and coordination of anti aircraft defences.I wonder how it was all tied in with AA batteries, the AFS etc etc?

Something to have a hour research on at some point.
 

syrup

LE
Would make sense as barrage balloons and search lights seem to have been a thing.

I had never really thought about the organisation, command and coordination of anti aircraft defences.I wonder how it was all tied in with AA batteries, the AFS etc etc?

Something to have a hour research on at some point.


It seems to have been part of the "Dowding System"


1_141.jpg
 
As a man dedicated to all tracked vehicles I venture into this thread with some trepidation, but I have a question about trucks.
Over in the modelling thread I am constructing a British CMP C60L GS truck as part of a WW2 western desert 1941/42 diorama. Can any one furnish me with some information as to the likely colour of the internal parts of the vehicle such as cab, some talk on the internet of them being painted in “cockpit green” and load carrying area, left plain wood or were they painted in the same colours as the outside?

I have discovered some pictures of the engines (Canadian) painted in a very pale grey with a hint of blue would this be the same for British trucks? Any guidance as to the colour of the engine bay would also be helpful as would anything on the chassis and suspension, though the latter two I suspect will just be coated in a thick layer of sand and dust.

Any help/guidance as to where to find out such information would be greatly appreciate as just about all I can find shows external details only, it may well be I’m just not looking in the right place.
 

Truxx

LE
As a man dedicated to all tracked vehicles I venture into this thread with some trepidation, but I have a question about trucks.
Over in the modelling thread I am constructing a British CMP C60L GS truck as part of a WW2 western desert 1941/42 diorama. Can any one furnish me with some information as to the likely colour of the internal parts of the vehicle such as cab, some talk on the internet of them being painted in “cockpit green” and load carrying area, left plain wood or were they painted in the same colours as the outside?

I have discovered some pictures of the engines (Canadian) painted in a very pale grey with a hint of blue would this be the same for British trucks? Any guidance as to the colour of the engine bay would also be helpful as would anything on the chassis and suspension, though the latter two I suspect will just be coated in a thick layer of sand and dust.

Any help/guidance as to where to find out such information would be greatly appreciate as just about all I can find shows external details only, it may well be I’m just not looking in the right place.
Virtually everything arriving from across the pond from about 1942 on arrived in green (US olive drab) and would subsequently have been over painted. Or not. We have recently worked on a vehicle that we know spent most of the war years in N Africa but there is not a trace of any colour other than green on it. So whilst all the visible surfaces might be desert sand, lots of the underneath and internal bits would have stayed the same colour they were when it came off the boat.

There is a guide out there to colours and markings, but not sure it covers engines etc. Factory colours for engines varied, but a civvy chevy of that era would have been "blue gray" but i think the military engines were in fact slate grey not as much blue, and quite a light colour. Lighter, for instance than the grey used on the engines of Ford built jeeps (grey fergie color). Equally I have seen them olive drab and black. They would only have been different in British service if the engine had been rebuilt, in which case it could have been olive drab or even duck egg blue (eu de nil or sky blue - I can never remember which was the wartime one)

Wood was invariably painted, even things like pick and shovel handles.

Its lovely these days, there are lots of enthusiastic "experts" out there who's only joy seems to be counting rivets. My experience is that for every "they were all like this" I can think of examples where that was or is not the case.

So the choice for the diorama is yours - if it looks right, then chances are, it is!
 
Last edited:

Smeggers

ADC
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
As a man dedicated to all tracked vehicles I venture into this thread with some trepidation, but I have a question about trucks.
Over in the modelling thread I am constructing a British CMP C60L GS truck as part of a WW2 western desert 1941/42 diorama. Can any one furnish me with some information as to the likely colour of the internal parts of the vehicle such as cab, some talk on the internet of them being painted in “cockpit green” and load carrying area, left plain wood or were they painted in the same colours as the outside?

I have discovered some pictures of the engines (Canadian) painted in a very pale grey with a hint of blue would this be the same for British trucks? Any guidance as to the colour of the engine bay would also be helpful as would anything on the chassis and suspension, though the latter two I suspect will just be coated in a thick layer of sand and dust.

Any help/guidance as to where to find out such information would be greatly appreciate as just about all I can find shows external details only, it may well be I’m just not looking in the right place.
Interiors were usually whatever light colour was available although White or Sky Grey were predominantly used. I have seen various shades of Light Green to Deck Tan and Ivory. Towards the later end of WW2, most interiors were left in their original primer coat of Matt Grey.
Engine bays would be either bare metal with the bulkhead in Matt Black or primer Grey and Black bulkhead.
Load carrying areas would be well-worn main exterior coat with occasional bare patches.
 

Truxx

LE
Interiors were usually whatever light colour was available although White or Sky Grey were predominantly used. I have seen various shades of Light Green to Deck Tan and Ivory. Towards the later end of WW2, most interiors were left in their original primer coat of Matt Grey.
Engine bays would be either bare metal with the bulkhead in Matt Black or primer Grey and Black bulkhead.
Load carrying areas would be well-worn main exterior coat with occasional bare patches.
Sounds a bit like armour to me.

I am not sure I have ever seen a wartime soft skin military vehicle with a light interior. And I have seen hundreds of the buggers.
 
Sounds a bit like armour to me.

I am not sure I have ever seen a wartime soft skin military vehicle with a light interior. And I have seen hundreds of the buggers.

I used to have a Matador, much abused as a timber tractor for most of it life.
End of war production but original colour inside cab was a very pale grey, almost white. Fairly certain it has never been painted inside.

However it was 1945 production and had gone straight in to London on housing work (I think building prefab housing)
 

Truxx

LE
I used to have a Matador, much abused as a timber tractor for most of it life.
End of war production but original colour inside cab was a very pale grey, almost white. Fairly certain it has never been painted inside.

However it was 1945 production and had gone straight in to London on housing work (I think building prefab housing)
I would say that most "Municipal" vehicles after the war, such as fire engines, dustcarts and the like, plus those that had been provided by a thing called the Ministry of Supply (almost certainly your matador in this case) were indeed painted lighter shades in cabs (exact colour varied, but was often a light creamy brown known as "County Cream") . A good example of the approach would be the "Green Goddess" fire appliance.

Wartime stuff though? Whatever green they had at the time, inside, outside, top and bottom, Britain was pretty short of green paint for instance, so virtually everything sourced stateside stayed the colour (color?) that it arrived off the boat in.

Oh and you need a Matador back in your life.
 

Smeggers

ADC
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
I fear you could be right but I have found these two examples, one is an AEC Matador 1942 and the other an AEC Militant of the same era...
42-AEC-2.jpg

Mayfair

Raf64123cdfdacdd9691faac6a154d0d6.jpeg

Militant
 
I fear you could be right but I have found . . . . an AEC Militant of the same era . . .

View attachment 554938
Militant
Before I was Commissioned, all of the Militants that I drove; and after as an RCT(V) officer, all the ones that I was responsible for; were painted the same "deep bronze" as the exterior.

I would suggest - and, I don't know how, but - that the Militant has never seen military service. There is no evidence of green paint, even under the yellow/mustard paint.
 
I would say that most "Municipal" vehicles after the war, such as fire engines, dustcarts and the like, plus those that had been provided by a thing called the Ministry of Supply (almost certainly your matador in this case) were indeed painted lighter shades in cabs (exact colour varied, but was often a light creamy brown known as "County Cream") . A good example of the approach would be the "Green Goddess" fire appliance.

Wartime stuff though? Whatever green they had at the time, inside, outside, top and bottom, Britain was pretty short of green paint for instance, so virtually everything sourced stateside stayed the colour (color?) that it arrived off the boat in.

Oh and you need a Matador back in your life.

I have distinct memories of standing up to turn the steering wheel.....
And thats before you try to drag 150 feet of 3/4 steel cable through the mud to pull a timberjack out of a hole.

I fancy something silly but doubt it would be a Matador. I've scratched that itch!

And yes you are right, mine was a Ministry of Supply one, still green on the outside though
Was a timber tractor when I bought it with an A frame crane and home brew spades.
 
Before I was Commissioned, all of the Militants that I drove; and after as an RCT(V) officer, all the ones that I was responsible for; were painted the same "deep bronze" as the exterior.

I would suggest - and, I don't know how, but - that the Militant has never seen military service. There is no evidence of green paint, even under the yellow/mustard paint.


You get the occasional oddball. The last Bedford I drove was ex CAA and had twin wheel rear axle and 4x4
It belonged to a mate, think it had about 30,000 on it and drove very nicely.

One of the most outrageous ones was an ex M6 Atkinson gritter.
Rolls Royce engine, six wheel drive and a genuine 70mph. Lovely old thing and went like something possessed
Apparently they built a batch of them when they put the M6 over Shap and buolt he M62. I'm told that they had a theory that they would need to run the snow ploughs at 70mph to keep pace with traffic.

1615045433461.png


It had lost the gritter body and plough by the time I had a go in one
 
Last edited:

Truxx

LE
You get the occasional oddball. The last Bedford I drove was ex CAA and had twin wheel rear axle and 4x4
It belonged to a mate, think it had about 30,000 on it and drove very nicely.

One of the most outrageous ones was an ex M6 Atkinson gritter.
Rolls Royce engine, six wheel drive and a genuine 70mph. Lovely old thing and went like something possessed
Apparently they built a batch of them when they put the M6 over Shap and buolt he M62. I'm told that they had a theory that they would need to run the snow ploughs at 70mph to keep pace with traffic.

View attachment 554964

It had lost the gritter body and plough by the time I had a go in one
There is one of those for sale at the mo, no ploughing or gritting gear but wrecking kit on the back instead. About 4 grand I think but in N Scotland..
 

Smeggers

ADC
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer

Latest Threads

Top