Truck Porn

Right.... If we're going to get silly...

Please tell me your having a laugh...... They rot quicker than a Fiat 132 in a Salt mine........
^_^ ^_^^_^^_^^_^
They may. They may not, I do not know.

But I do know they were a handsome, and fitting culmination of a hundred years of Leyland engineering successes . . . . and, disasters.

I attended in Edinburgh, a Leyland presentation - organised by the/my Institute of the Motor Industry - at the time of the launch of the Roadtrain.

I appreciate a vehicle engineering/sales & marketing slide presentation, may have little affect on the vehicles once they are in service - but, the background information was fascinating! They had asked Ogle (HST train, and various cars), and also the designer of the "Classic" Scania (above), to submit designs for the cab.

Fortunately they had the confidence to go with their own "modular" cab design, which we now know.

That Leyland "modular" cab design for the Roadtrain, is - of course - the basis of the Scammell 8 wheel 8x6 DROPS fleet, and various road-chassis used by the RAF as tankers.
 
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HND in Business Studies (Advertising & Marketing). I quickly used that HND to obtain the (now Chartered) Institute of Marketing’s Diploma in Marketing; and, started studying for my Open University BA degree.
Watch it, he'll be claiming to be a transport manager next......

"But its only an inch on the map, should only take an hour......" :mrgreen:
 
Watch it, he'll ( . . . you'll ?! . . . ), be claiming to be a transport manager next......

"But its only an inch on the map, should only take an hour......" :mrgreen:
Well . . . . .

As a young Troop Commander . . . and, subsequently older Sqn OC . . . I suppose that would qualify me :) .

It certainly did qualify me for membership of the Chartered Institute of Transport & Logistics.

(Did I mention that I like joining Institutes - Chartered or otherwise ;) !! ).

But as a civilian . . No!!

Respect to @jagman2 !! There are more regulations, and legal liability/responsibilities, than I would want to deal with.
 
Passed my Class 1 in one of those at Leconfield, pulling a 30 foot trailer. The ickle Bedford normally used was VOR..... Huge fun..
Which one of the four that I mentioned, did Leconfield have/use?!

I passed my HGV, in Bootle with 238 Sqn RCT(V), using the little Bedford artic. Circa 1971?!

The next/only time I actually used the HGV/LCV licence was post-BLMF, when back home, I did some agency driving.

"How long have you had an HGV/LCV licence?"

"Oh, about twenty seven years . . . "

"Well we should have no difficulty finding you some driving work"
 
Going back to the pro/cons of d/drive.
If I had to make the choice, knowing what I know now, 36 years driving with 12 years heavy Haulage.
Rear Tag axle along with a sliding turntable is my choice, both Volvo and Scania started using them in the late 70s early 80s.
Over the years, I've used that configuration on probably, four long term trucks I've been given to drive. Only once have I ever been stuck and because when you lift the axle, the weight is thrown onto the drive. You also have the added bonus of shortening the wheel base. Dead useful when backing into tight places.
 
Which one of the four that I mentioned, did Leconfield have/use?!

I passed my HGV, in Bootle with 238 Sqn RCT(V), using the little Bedford artic. Circa 1971?!

The next/only time I actually used the HGV/LCV licence was post-BLMF, when back home, I did some agency driving.

"How long have you had an HGV/LCV licence?"

"Oh, about twenty seven years . . . "

"Well we should have no difficulty finding you some driving work"
Took my class 3 in an RL (another brilliant truck, never got stuck), then took a Tops course for my class one.
Loved the last bit RCT(V), about 27 years.....
Ment to add, at least you know what a map is....... Oh hang on he's a Rupert! :slow:
 

LARD

War Hero
The Crusader
Which one of the four that I mentioned, did Leconfield have/use?!

I passed my HGV, in Bootle with 238 Sqn RCT(V), using the little Bedford artic. Circa 1971?!

The next/only time I actually used the HGV/LCV licence was post-BLMF, when back home, I did some agency driving.

"How long have you had an HGV/LCV licence?"

"Oh, about twenty seven years . . . "

"Well we should have no difficulty finding you some driving work"

The Crusader.
 

LARD

War Hero
Going back to the pro/cons of d/drive.
If I had to make the choice, knowing what I know now, 36 years driving with 12 years heavy Haulage.
Rear Tag axle along with a sliding turntable is my choice, both Volvo and Scania started using them in the late 70s early 80s.
Over the years, I've used that configuration on probably, four long term trucks I've been given to drive. Only once have I ever been stuck and because when you lift the axle, the weight is thrown onto the drive. You also have the added bonus of shortening the wheel base. Dead useful when backing into tight places.
I think Volvo initially offered both tag and mid-lift. Got to agree the tag benefits. The MAN’s we have now are a different kettle of fish. Sort of combination of both but with the reduced length of a mid-lift. Auto box and all the gizmos. Of the we have, only one spends one night a week away from home! Try getting a day cab..... utter crap residuals
 
Respect to @jagman2 !! There are more regulations, and legal liability/responsibilities, than I would want to deal with.
It has its moments....
Mostly I enjoy it, sometimes you spend hours second guessing yourself whether you've missed something or if one of your muppets has managed to get one over on you.

Last weeks little pleasure was checking the vehicle downloads and catching a driver who had driven 194km without a tacho card in......
 
The only MAN I've driven is a Heavy Haulage 150 tonner. But I'm afraid I've got no time for mid lifts coupled to a Autobox, lost count of the number of times I've seen them stuck in snow, ice and off road.
 
Going back to the pro/cons of d/drive.
If I had to make the choice, knowing what I know now, 36 years driving with 12 years heavy Haulage.
Rear Tag axle along with a sliding turntable is my choice, both Volvo and Scania started using them in the late 70s early 80s.
Over the years, I've used that configuration on probably, four long term trucks I've been given to drive. Only once have I ever been stuck and because when you lift the axle, the weight is thrown onto the drive. You also have the added bonus of shortening the wheel base. Dead useful when backing into tight places.

Thanks RR3, I'll keep that in mind. Most of the work for us will be simple, from factory to a smallish RDC that we are in the process of opening.
The new RDC has a half acre yard so no tight manouvres required there, our 26's have rear tag's and they do make life easier
Weight wise we don't really need three axle tractors and if we can get high enough horsepower on two then I will do so. Most used two axles don't have a lot of power (alright, I'll admit to a horsepower fetish and I'm trying really hard not to buy FH16's). I doubt we'll ever put much more than 10 tonnes in our trailers.
 
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The only MAN I've driven is a Heavy Haulage 150 tonner. But I'm afraid I've got no time for mid lifts coupled to a Autobox, lost count of the number of times I've seen them stuck in snow, ice and off road.
MAN are alright for everyday stuff, but they are the VW Golf of the truck world and very dull. They also make DAF steering seem precise.
 
Most used two axles don't have a lot of power (alright, I'll admit to a horsepower fetish and I'm trying really hard not to buy FH16's). I doubt we'll ever put much more than 10 tonnes in our trailers.
Have a look for a F16, no adblu, 500 ponies, manual box, good Volvo back up.
One thing I would do, any truck over 10 years old, would be to replace every relay and if financially possible every censor.
MAN are alright for everyday stuff, but they are the VW Golf of the truck world and very dull. They also make DAF steering seem precise.
Agree there, even with 100 ton of ballast on a trailer that weighs 20 tons, the steering did feel a bit vague.
 
MAN are alright for everyday stuff, but they are the VW Golf of the truck world and very dull. They also make DAF steering seem precise.
You do know that the VW Group have owned MAN for a while, and over the last few years (9-10 ?!), added Scania to their "port folio" ?! ;) .
 

Truxx

LE
I have just agreed a budget with the grown ups at work for the next 6 months.
It includes two tractor units, another 26 tonner and 3 7.5 tonners plus assorted vans.

Its not in my nature to buy new lorries and I'm a bit tight with the boss's money

So, 20 grand apiece for 2nd hand tractor units, two to buy and a free reign on the choice, what would the collective Arsseratti go for?

I'm leaning toward an Actos for everyday dull stuff and either a Foden double drive or possibley an ERF EC14 to play with......
My two deputies have gone a bit pale at the ERF/Foden idea, bt they'll just have to pukka up and do as they are told
I saw a couple of the JCB ERF fleet on the A50 the other day. Just fab. My cummins engine EC10 is good for 12 mpg and on its last test beat the Euro 5 emissions standards. Downside is the twin splitter which would fox the modern day steering wheel attendant.
 

Truxx

LE
I do like the suggestion by @robinrocket111 of the old(er) Swedish trucks:

the Volvo F88 or 89 . . .

View attachment 419369

or, the "Classic" Scania 141 . . .

View attachment 419370


If not yourself, then I do hope someone is preserving examples of them both, but particularly the stylish, big Scania.

If you are minded to indulge yourselves going that old, the last examples from the Leyland group contained some you might consider:

the magnificent Leyland Roadtrain . . .

View attachment 419375


and, the "rufty tufty" Scammell Crusader,

View attachment 419377

Probably the last use of the Motor Panels cab. With swing-out radiator to give access to the engine from the front. They used to appear on Witham's site, but I have not seen one for a while. A "clean" (undamaged) one, would - of course - have been serviced regularly, and possibly have (very) low milage?!
Yonks ago when the top limit for artics went from 32 to 38 tons the MOD set up a trial for the Seddon replacement. We got an Iveco, a Renault and a Volvo, all running at just under 300BHP. For comparison purposes the only "in service" machine we could use was the Crusader, running, I think, 260BHP and double drive, All the competitors were loaded up to 38 tons and off we went.

The newcomers simply had their doors blown off by the old Scammell. I have no idea why, it just seemed like the RR horses were just bigger, better and a whole lot stronger then all the others.
 
I saw a couple of the JCB ERF fleet on the A50 the other day. Just fab. My cummins engine EC10 is good for 12 mpg and on its last test beat the Euro 5 emissions standards. Downside is the twin splitter which would fox the modern day steering wheel attendant.
With Volvo, you have to spec a manual box now, otherwise you get their i_Shift standard now. I suspect a lot of the other manufacturers are no different.
 

Truxx

LE
With Volvo, you have to spec a manual box now, otherwise you get their i_Shift standard now. I suspect a lot of the other manufacturers are no different.
I actually cannot think of one - even the "manuals" are just a manually selected auto (which is what the twin splitter was/is after all)
 
I saw a couple of the JCB ERF fleet on the A50 the other day. Just fab. My cummins engine EC10 is good for 12 mpg and on its last test beat the Euro 5 emissions standards. Downside is the twin splitter which would fox the modern day steering wheel attendant.

Mos of JCB;s work is now contracted out (Bellis of Wrexham do a lot of it) but if I'm honest I find the JCB fleet a bit of an inspiration for where I'm going with this.
I take great pleasure from seeing their pristine ERF's working

Took be all of 6 minutes earlier this summer to convince the CEO spending four grand on a 12 year old Atego to have the fridge box refurbed was a good idea.

A month later it came back with its life extended by three years and back out on the road 2000 miles a week for the foreseable.
I intend to do the same with 2010 DAF CF in the new year.

Asides from low emisions zones where I have no choice I fully intend to run older lorries and life extend them as long as possible. By choice, not necessity, I want to do it.

Half of where I'm going with this whole idea of buying an older tractor unit is that I think it can be done, it can be fun and it can (almost) be practical
I'm fully aware that many transport managers out there will think I'm a bit left field with it. I really do think I can run an 80's or 90's lorry commercially and this is the first stage of that plan or at least an attempt at it.

Like I said earlier, my very level headed, financial guru of a CEO is also a closet petrol head and he is so far coming along for the ride. I reckon that if I chuck a fully liveried 1980's Foden or ERF tractor unit in to some of this country' most prestigious sporting events he'll be smiling at the idea.
If I'm entirely honest, I think he's indulging me a little bit of eccentricity in his view, I also think he'll continue to do so unless I fuk it up in a big way and leave thirty grands worth of time sensetive delivery on the side of the M6 in a thirty year old lorry

Far, far more interesting and entertaining than chucking a leased Actros onto the job.

Just think about it for a moment, 500 horsepower of Cummins running down the M6 in the middle of the night, no limiter, a pair of Eminox's bellowing away.......
All you need is a decent jukebox and CW McCAll giving it big decibels, how much better could life by than that? (only bettered if you get Ali MacGraw riding shotgun)
 

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