Troops arrested in Basra

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#3
Follows yesterday's arrest of a prominent "Al-Mahdi Army" figure. Coalition press release about the arrest:

Multi-National Division - South East names captured terror suspects

In the early hours of Sept. 18, an operation was conducted by Multi National Division - South East in the districts of Al Jameat and Tuninah in Basra. This operation was the result of an ongoing Multi-National Force investigation that identified individuals believed to be responsible for organizing terrorist attacks against Coalition forces, resulting in the deaths of nine members of Coalition forces in the past two months in Basra. The operation resulted in three individuals being detained.

Among those arrested are Sheik Ahmed Majid Farttusi and Sayyid Sajjad, known leaders of the Mahdi Militia in Basra.

"I am well aware that the people that we have arrested are prominent individuals in Basra," commented Brigadier John Lorrimer, British Army commander of the 12th Mechanized Brigade in Basra. "But let me make it absolutely clear: we have acted against them as individuals, not as members of any particular organization. As the people of Basra you are entitled to your own religious beliefs and political opinions. Those are not matters for MNF. We will not, however, tolerate terrorism and will act against it whenever we can."
Source : CPIC via several agencies
 
#4
As a random thought - it occurred to me that the 2 guys are still alive - unlike the 2 Sigs Cpls grabbed in Belfast. A new Iraqi civilisation may yet have a chance.

Hope they come through it in good nick, local filth may not take kindly to being fired on.
 
#5
Hope they didnt have relatives in Camp Breadbasket!
 
#7
The image of those blokes trying to escape from the burning warrior, whilst the mob tries to snatch them sums it up. Thanks to all those armchair lawyers and tree hugging cnuts that want to see our blokes in the dock for war crimes, soldiers are now afraid of making a decison regarding opening fire. Lethal decisons often need to be made in a split second in order to protect the life of a comrade. I watched that footage in horror and fully expected to hear 5.56mm going down, did it? did it fcuk and I'll bet that was down to a moment of indecision by an individual soldier. The guys appear to have escaped, so many tut and argue against my point, however, what if the mob had got hold of them -what do you reckon of the consequences...........................
 
#8
muzzleflash said:
The image of those blokes trying to escape from the burning warrior, whilst the mob tries to snatch them sums it up. Thanks to all those armchair lawyers and tree hugging cnuts that want to see our blokes in the dock for war crimes, soldiers are now afraid of making a decison regarding opening fire. Lethal decisons often need to be made in a split second in order to protect the life of a comrade. I watched that footage in horror and fully expected to hear 5.56mm going down, did it? did it fcuk and I'll bet that was down to a moment of indecision by an individual soldier. The guys appear to have escaped, so many tut and argue against my point, however, what if the mob had got hold of them -what do you reckon of the consequences...........................
Spot on mate. Better to be tried by twelve than carried by six.

I dare say petrol bombs being thrown, together with rocks bottles and poles, then attempts to grab the men is a threat to life.

the next tosser who went to throw a petrol bomb should get a 5.56mm re-education or a gentle flurry from the chain gun may assist.
 
#9
muzzleflash said:
The image of those blokes trying to escape from the burning warrior, whilst the mob tries to snatch them sums it up. Thanks to all those armchair lawyers and tree hugging cnuts that want to see our blokes in the dock for war crimes, soldiers are now afraid of making a decison regarding opening fire. Lethal decisons often need to be made in a split second in order to protect the life of a comrade. I watched that footage in horror and fully expected to hear 5.56mm going down, did it? did it fcuk and I'll bet that was down to a moment of indecision by an individual soldier. The guys appear to have escaped, so many tut and argue against my point, however, what if the mob had got hold of them -what do you reckon of the consequences...........................
I felt sick watching it too. Are we sure they got away...it wasn't clear. I agree there should have been some support. More people will die as a result of these soldiers being restricted in decisions they can make. Poor guys
 
#10
From what I saw, which I assume is the same as everyone else, the commander seemed to get a rock to the head before he got off the back decks. The responce by the rag head as he jumped off did not look pretty to me! I don't think the odds look great but I'm sure we will find out soon enough!

The place is out of control. Leave them to it, let them find an Arab solution!
 
#11
Tony Bliar has no shame - just a coward pushing his pawns around on a chess board. How dare he look a British soldier in the eye again. Cnut.
 
#12
I'll be glued to the news this evening with a horrible feeling in my stomach. I pity any of their family and friends who may be watching it too and don't know the outcome. Mob violence is scary
 
#13
Having looked at the footage again, I'm going to go out on a limb here. Towards the end of the footage, you can just about see what looks like a base line of troops with shields and a couple of snatch wagons. Not sure if it is all in sequence or what the time line is between the comd jumping out and the end of the film but one hopes its damn close. Fingers crossed.

Time to leave them to it I think. Well done Bliar. Cnut.
 
#14
Right.

Speculation on the fate of the crew needs to stop now. MoD will issue a statement in due course no doubt, and I also have no doubt , and hope fervently that if it looks far worse than it is , then someone on the ground will relay that information back to this forum, as has been the case in the past.

Please stop speculating on what has happened , I have no doubt that family and others of the Regiment involved, will be screaming all over the net trying to get information. Please do not say anything to increase that anxiety.

PTP
 
#16
I thought something about this situation didn't "feel right" . A spontaneous demonstration, in support of the Police Force? Something else is going on here. Something smells very bad indeed. We need our people in custody out right now.

MOD-DATE: 09/19/05 16:24:06

BREAKING11-SEP19-IRAQ-REPORTER STILL

BREAKING11: STORY 138
REPORTER STILL
BASRA, IRAQ
SEPTEMBER19, 2005
NATURAL
DURATION:00:20
SOURCE:REUTERS
FEED HISTORY:BN11(1545GMT)
INTRO: Iraqi reporter for New York Times found dead in Basra.

TV AND WEB RESTRICTIONS~**NONE**~

SHOWS: (BN11) BASRA, IRAQ (SEPTEMBER19, 2005) (REUTERS - ACCESS ALL)
1. STILL OF SLAIN BODY OF FAKHER HAIDER, AN IRAQI REPORTER WHO WORKED FOR
THE NEW YORK TIMES

STORY: An Iraqi working as a reporter for the New York Times was found dead in the southern city of Basra on Monday (September 19) after being kidnapped by masked men, family members and a doctor said.

Fakher Haider, who had worked for the Times for 2-1/2 years, was found with his hands bound and a single bullet wound to the head, a doctor in the forensic department of Basra's hospital told Reuters, speaking on condition of
anonymity.

Employees of the New York Times in Baghdad said they couldn't confirm Haider's death but said they were enquiring into reports that he had been kidnapped and killed.

Haider's brother told Reuters in Basra that four masked men in a dark Toyota vehicle had arrived at the family home in an apartment complex in central Basra after midnight on Sunday.

They said they were from the intelligence services and that they needed to speak to Haider in connection with an investigation, the brother said. They bundled him into their vehicle and told his wife and family not to interfere.

The reporter's body was found several hours later in a deserted area on the outskirts of the city.

Haider is the second journalist to be kidnapped and killed in Basra in the past two months.

Steven Vincent, an American freelance reporter who was writing a book about the city and who had written an opinion piece for the New York Times criticising the Basra security forces, was kidnapped and found shot dead in August.

His female translator was abducted with him and also shot several times but survived and is recovering in hospital.

Iraqi reporters in Basra, a predominantly Shi'ite city, say local security forces are increasingly under the control of militias loyal to two
competing Shi'ite political groups.

The dominant force is the Supreme Council for the Islamic Revolution in Iraq, a pro-Iranian political party that is influential in the government and has a large militia known as the Badr Organisation or Badr Brigade.

It competes with the Mehdi Army, a nationalist militia loyal to young Shi'ite cleric Moqtada al-Sadr, whose followers also have a strong presence in the police force in Basra, Iraq's second largest, and have clashed recently
with Badr followers.
 
#17
Disconcerting silence from the authorities.

I pray that these guys are well.
 
#18
It is a tragedy that we simply cannot trust our politicians to do the right thing. Bliar should be on the phone now, in person to Talabani, stating that if these troops are not released immediately into British custody, then there will be an immediate stand-down of all soldiers in theatre prior to withdrawal.

The chances of this happening - tit all. Easier to let two blokes suffer.
 
#19
The areas named are very dodgy parts of Bas and this is not the first time that British troops have been attacked using such tactics in the area. I thank God that the present GOC has a set of b*lls and will hopefully surround the local f*lth until they give us the lads back.

We all know the tangled set of allegiances that tie these disparate groups together. The Warrior footage looked further north than the districts named, but I may be wrong and things spread like wildfire out there.

I'm happy to hear the boys in the Warriors got away relatively unscathed (I'm commenting on the latest BBC footage) and hope that the two boys will soon be released.

I'm amazed about the hand wringing concerning the shooting by British soldiers of a police force we know is corrupt to the core. But I also recall that we supplied these hoods with most of their weaponary, "O! We are very sorry, but our armoury was once more raided by Ali Baba!!!" YEAH RIGHT.

Agree with evryone posted so far, it is time to go, leave them to it, the place is not worth one British life.
 
#20
MrPVRd said:
It is a tragedy that we simply cannot trust our politicians to do the right thing. Bliar should be on the phone now, in person to Talabani, stating that if these troops are not released immediately into British custody, then there will be an immediate stand-down of all soldiers in theatre prior to withdrawal.

The chances of this happening - tit all. Easier to let two blokes suffer.
Fook that!!! Tell the buggaz we'll send a load of squaddie wives out - that'll get things moving!

Seriously though, good luck to the guys out there, fair play to them for the restraint shown, I'm sure a few of us on here would have messed up a few track pads!

CC_TA
 

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