Trials pre 1980's Para smock , Newey Swift new unissued

Men at Arnhem was one of the best books I have read from a personel view of a Company Commander and comand in battle during WW2. Athough he originaly wrote it as a novel it was obvious it was an auto-biography and was about 156 Para Bn originaly formed in India in 1941 as 151 Para Bn. In my mind it is more readable than 18 Platoon, although that book was good. I am suprised it wasn't on the reading list for junior officers or at Sandhurst. Maybe because it was from a Company Commanders view.
I must have read it for the first time shortly after publication, either when at school/in the Cadets or early in my Regular Army life.: that is to say, at a time when I was not much acquainted with the possibility of failure or defeat of British soldiery.

Reading it again, 40(+) years later (and having spent time walking the battlefield with the author, among others, 30 years ago) it resonates entirely differently.

It's a no holds barred first hand account of a badly planned (yet gallantly, heartbreakingly gallantly fought) mission going catastrophically South even before the author's boots had made first contact with Dutch soil.
 
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Just_plain_you

War Hero
Gets on my tits fishermen wearing camouflage everything, who are they hiding from ? Do carp have periscopes ? Are Trouts tactically aware ?
Got to stay hidden from the wife somehow.

Or are you referring to a different trout?
 
And another ruddy thing, why do fishermen need a massive great trolley full of gear just to catch a creature with a brain the size of a pea ?

One bloke I was chatting to had £2000 worth of kit including scaffolding to build a seat over the bank to get a foot closer to the canal.
 
. . . is ideal for wear in cold dry climates, where high wind can aggravate the risks of operating in ambient temperatures well below freezing.

In cold, wet conditions, however, it's a different story. Repeatedly get it wet and muddy, then wash and dry it, it very soon abrades away to look like you were wearing it when your clown car exploded.

Trust me on this (and maybe @Bubbles_Barker see #73 above)
Agreed - designed for the Arctic and fell apart if overused in temperate environs.
 
And another ruddy thing, why do fishermen need a massive great trolley full of gear just to catch a creature with a brain the size of a pea ?

One bloke I was chatting to had £2000 worth of kit including scaffolding to build a seat over the bank to get a foot closer to the canal.
Did you push him into the canal?
 
Lightweights, huh, to be really ally it had to be O.G.s
Got issued OGs for my final Sandhurst exercise in Cyprus - became Uber ally alongside 44 pattern kit added to 58 pattern etc...I wore OG shirts for ages afterwards until they fell apart but in my youth the combination of arctic smock and technicolour jungle trousers was the absolute zenith of early 80s cool.
Oh, and the NI issue green waterproofs were I think ‘Jackets, foul weather’, which were an RAF thing originally.
 

Slime

LE
My first was super light material. Later versions issued to me were heavier material.
The two wind proof smocks were the ‘SAS’ and artic smocks in lightweight gaberdine material. the SAS smock had the plain hood, the artic smock had the hood with a wire and snorkel flap.

There was also a parka with epaulettes, a rank tank and snorkel wired hood, that was in the normal thicker material.

As you later mentioned the olive green foul weather jackets. For ages I had an olive jacket of the RN type foul whether jackets with a chin/ mouth cover and separate inner waterproof hood. That was worn until it fell to pieces. )
 

par avion

War Hero
It was a great film, originally writen as the novel 'Willing Flesh' by Willi Heinrich based on his wartime experience in a Jager Division on the Russian front.

What was totaly unrealistic though was the scene when he was wounded and ended up back in the field hospital.

After spending his convelesance shagging Senta Berger who plays a DRK nurse, after a night of passion he goes out on the balconey for a post coital fag, sees the boys just about to get in the truck on the way back to the front. He looks back into the room, sees Senta's bare arse (and a very nice one it was if I can say so) as she is puting on her uniform, and then shouts "Wait for me lads".

If it was me it would be "Err, don't wait for me boys, I will get a lift back on a later truck ,(much much later) give my regards to the rest of the lads"

You are going to die pretty soon anyway. Might as well have some fun and be shot by firing squad as be shot by the Ivans.

And anyway weren't the nurses reserved for officers.
 
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par avion

War Hero
I must have read it for the first time shortly after publication, either when at school/in the Cadets or early in my Regular Army life.: that is to say, at a time when I was not much acquainted with the possibility of failure or defeat of British soldiery.

Reading it again, 40(+) years later (and having spent time walking the battlefield with the author, among others, 30 years ago) it resonates entirely differently.

It's a no holds barred first hand account of a badly planned (yet gallantly, heartbreakingly gallantly fought) mission going catastrophically South even before the author's boots had made first contact with Dutch soil.
It first came out in 1976 and there were several re-prints. I read several times over the years. Some books you can read when you are young, think they are brilliant books but you read them decades later and they are not so good. An example was 'The Forgotten Soldier' by Guy Sajer very popular over the years with the squaddy literary fraternity. I read it when I was 18 and thought it was great, but read it again many years later and realised it was likely to be a fake.

Every time I have read 'Men at Arnhem' though it has been very vivid. As if you are seeing it from his eyes. The first night attack after landing and the hetic retreat to Osterbeek pursued by gernman armour, loosing two thirds of the battalion including the CO, RSM, and most of the officers within 48 hours.
 
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