Trench Detectives / Reversing Bullets

Discussion in 'Military History and Militaria' started by delberto, May 23, 2010.

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  1. Anyone else watch Trench Detectives about tank F6 ?
    I'd never heard of taking the bullet head out and refitting it the wrong way round to aid armour penetration, you learn something every day..... :D
     
  2. ugly

    ugly LE Moderator

    What a load of bollox
     
  3. Alsacien

    Alsacien LE Moderator

    That is what I thought - but the tests seem to indicate some truth in this.
    I heard the same story in French museums about the heavily reinforced trenches in the Vosges (the last couple of years of WW1 were totally static there).
     
  4. ugly

    ugly LE Moderator

    Possible but not officially sanctioned in any army, there is a bigger chance of the bullet just ending up in backwards through tumbling through something. If you have been daft enough ever to have loaded even a pistol bullet backwards then you would know that the accuracy is pants.
     
  5. I can see how it would work, but surely the round would be highly unstable in flight, as the air pressure on the base of the round would make it oscilate loads?
     
  6. Alsacien

    Alsacien LE Moderator

    Hollow point bullets work.
    I guess range and velocity become the issues - but these are powerful rounds often used at relatively close range.
     
  7. ugly

    ugly LE Moderator

    How would an exposed lead core base or even flat base copper jacket have any greater penetration than an FMJ?
     
  8. ugly

    ugly LE Moderator

    Yes but a pointed base and flat front?
     
  9. Alsacien

    Alsacien LE Moderator

    HESH type effect?
     
  10. ugly

    ugly LE Moderator

    Hesh isnt really penetration is it, its more scabbing of inside of the armour!
     
  11. Having watched the program I don't think it was suggested that any real penetration was achieved. The idea being that German snipers would use plates of steel with slots allowing a rifle to aimed and fired through it. The apparent idea of firing a round of this nature into it was to send small metal fragments into the eyes of the German sniper.

    I doubt it's effective-ness, perhaps this could an early Army urban legend??
     
  12. Might the bigger surface area increase spalling inside the tank?
     
  13. Alsacien

    Alsacien LE Moderator

    I'm no expert, but that is the same understanding I have.
    I guess the scab could end up big enough to be a hole. When I look around the battlefields in my area, the plates, key holes and OP's are scarred by all sorts of holes. Some are obviously scrapnel, but some are circa 1-2cm diameter "bullet holes" - I don't recall seeing "bursting" metal on the insides from a direct penetration, but never really paid close attention to that I must admit, the space inside is tight though and I think I would have noticed such a hazard.
     
  14. This seems fairly pointless, wouldn't .303 ball spall into shards in just the same way hitting the steel plate pointy end first?