Transfer chase up

Discussion in 'Armed Forces Redundancy Scheme 2010' started by Sheridan6786, Nov 15, 2012.

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  1. Hi all,

    Around 6/7 months ago i placed an application in with my RCMO to transfer to the Royal Signals from the Royal Armoured Corps (2 RTR). After a month or 2 I was e-mailing my CMO fortnighly asking for any news & all I got back was 'no news yet' or 'not heard anything'. I am still receiving these replies from him. I have heard that I can get in touch with APC Glasgow but have no luck as of yet trying to find a contact number for anyone.

    Also I have now been told that I am up for PAP 10. I feel that maybe if my transfer had gone through (or even put through the process) that this might not be happening. If I hear from APC Glasgow that my transfer paperwork had never been submitted do I have any grounds to take legal action?

    Thanks for reading
     
  2. If your P7 perm your were always going to be PAP10 because you are below the minimum retention standard, wether you transferred or not, I also would think you have no grounds for legal action if you have been P7 for a number of years.
     
  3. Read PAP 10, it will give you all the info you need. From Chap 10:

    1001. The purpose of this chapter is to outline the mechanisms for the management of personnel below the minimum required for their Arm and Service as defined in Tables 5 and 6. When an Officer or Soldier is assessed by a Medical Board to be permanently below the minimum medical grading required by their Arm or Service or where the CO is unable to continue to employ an individual fully due to medical restrictions, then the Restricted Employability in Current Unit (RECU) Process described below is to be followed. This does not affect an individual’s entitlement to resign or terminate their Commission / Engagement. This process allows for consideration of transfer to a different Arm or Service or, where this is not possible, discharge on medical grounds. Under certain circumstances, the individual’s case may be referred to the Army Employment Board (AEB) to determine an individual’s future; the processes for the AEB are described in Chapter 12. The RECU Process should not be initiated until the individual is medically assessed as being permanently downgraded and stable or having a disability that is of slow progression; temporary inability to perform duties due to a medical condition does not automatically fall into this category. The key objective is to ensure that the skills that personnel have acquired through long and expensive training should not be wasted if continued employment can be found, within their medical capacity, which will not exacerbate their medical condition or place at risk the health and safety of others. Legal advice has been sought and incorporated throughout the development of this complex policy.