Training plan help for paras

Hi everyone, i was making a few changes to my training plan and i was wondering if its worth it to get some dumbells or kettlebells to add to my training plan for joining paras below or if this is fine and if i should, how should i implement them for my plan wuthout changing too much, cheers for any advice.

Monday:
AM: Superset Workout.
PM: easy 3miles.

Tuesday:
AM: british army 2km run test (jog 0.6mile to warm up, rest 2min then 1.5miles best effort.)
PM: stretching.

Wednesday:
AM: 6 miles slow and steady run.

Thursday:.
AM: Superset workout
PM: 2 mile run (optional)

Friday:
AM: easy 3 miles
PM: Rest and Recover, maybe do 15 minutes stretching

Saturday:
AM: interval runs, ¼ mile×8, 1min rest in between.

Sunday:
REST. Absolute rest day.

Supersets

Push ups for 30 seconds then crunches for 30 seconds ×4
Then
Pull ups for 30 seconds then squats for 30 seconds ×4
Then
Burpees for 30 seconds then decline push ups for 30 seconds ×4
Then
Australian pull ups for 30 seconds then knee to elbow for 30 seconds ×4
Then
Plank push up for 30 seconds then tricep dips for 30 seconds ×4
Repeat all of this twice then 1min bear crawl

Add weighted vest once you can do 50+ push ups and 8-10 pull ups.
 
Just an observation; my lad does similar to that, lots of what I call static exercise and not much movement, ie running, or moving at speed (not running) carrying a load. My lad is after a good set of abs and reasonable muscle bulk all around - not big body builder type muscle, but respectable for the wimmin.

I was never a para, but when I used to see them in Aldershot they were always running, or moving at pace with a rucksack/bergan on their back. That takes a level of endurance and what we term battle fitness that you will not develop doing static exercise.

If it was me I would throw in another weekly 6 miler at least, and every two to three weeks a 10 - 12 miler.

Use your bodyweight, you don't need expensive gear. Navy SEALs reckon they do around 500 to 1000 push ups a day during their training, add to that pull ups, burpees and other bodyweight exercise and you are golden.

My own regime when I was training for something was:

Sparrowfart: Unit runs/PT twice weekly.

Lunchtime: Walking up and down the 6 floors of back stairs of the building with a 15kg bergan for half an hour, alternating days with multi-gym. Up and down the stairs because Viersen was as flat as a billiard table.

After work: 6 to 8 miles a day. Pre-run I would bang out 400 to 500 sit ups and a hundred push ups. I got the sit ups bug from a mate I used to do martial arts with who had the Guinness world record for inclined sit ups.....build the core and everything else falls into place.

Fridays: We finished at lunchtime so I would run from Viersen to JHQ which was around 10 miles, used to take me around 1 hr 10 mins.

On top of that: Using a bicycle and not a car for short hops, being the badgemans appointed pace maker for unit BFT's, along with regular organised training for patrolling and military skills competitions.
 
Just an observation; my lad does similar to that, lots of what I call static exercise and not much movement, ie running, or moving at speed (not running) carrying a load. My lad is after a good set of abs and reasonable muscle bulk all around - not big body builder type muscle, but respectable for the wimmin.

I was never a para, but when I used to see them in Aldershot they were always running, or moving at pace with a rucksack/bergan on their back. That takes a level of endurance and what we term battle fitness that you will not develop doing static exercise.

If it was me I would throw in another weekly 6 miler at least, and every two to three weeks a 10 - 12 miler.

Use your bodyweight, you don't need expensive gear. Navy SEALs reckon they do around 500 to 1000 push ups a day during their training, add to that pull ups, burpees and other bodyweight exercise and you are golden.

My own regime when I was training for something was:

Sparrowfart: Unit runs/PT twice weekly.

Lunchtime: Walking up and down the 6 floors of back stairs of the building with a 15kg bergan for half an hour, alternating days with multi-gym. Up and down the stairs because Viersen was as flat as a billiard table.

After work: 6 to 8 miles a day. Pre-run I would bang out 400 to 500 sit ups and a hundred push ups. I got the sit ups bug from a mate I used to do martial arts with who had the Guinness world record for inclined sit ups.....build the core and everything else falls into place.

Fridays: We finished at lunchtime so I would run from Viersen to JHQ which was around 10 miles, used to take me around 1 hr 10 mins.

On top of that: Using a bicycle and not a car for short hops, being the badgemans appointed pace maker for unit BFT's, along with regular organised training for patrolling and military skills competitions.
Appreciate the feedback and yeah im going to progressively increase the running lengths but the running plan ive got on here was recommended by someone on the paras version of this and then i got the bodyweight workout from a former paras' book but i modified it abit, right now though i could probably run 6 or 7 miles max without needing to rest for a few days so that is something i need to work on.

also with the changed army fitness tests would it not be worth it to buy some kettle bells or dumbells to cater more towards that and about the tabbing i was going to do that once ive got alot better at running because i didnt want to rush myself too much, ive give myself until 2022 to get in shape so ive got a while.
 

ACAB

LE
Just an observation; my lad does similar to that, lots of what I call static exercise and not much movement, ie running, or moving at speed (not running) carrying a load. My lad is after a good set of abs and reasonable muscle bulk all around - not big body builder type muscle, but respectable for the wimmin.

I was never a para, but when I used to see them in Aldershot they were always running, or moving at pace with a rucksack/bergan on their back. That takes a level of endurance and what we term battle fitness that you will not develop doing static exercise.

If it was me I would throw in another weekly 6 miler at least, and every two to three weeks a 10 - 12 miler.

Use your bodyweight, you don't need expensive gear. Navy SEALs reckon they do around 500 to 1000 push ups a day during their training, add to that pull ups, burpees and other bodyweight exercise and you are golden.

My own regime when I was training for something was:

Sparrowfart: Unit runs/PT twice weekly.

Lunchtime: Walking up and down the 6 floors of back stairs of the building with a 15kg bergan for half an hour, alternating days with multi-gym. Up and down the stairs because Viersen was as flat as a billiard table.

After work: 6 to 8 miles a day. Pre-run I would bang out 400 to 500 sit ups and a hundred push ups. I got the sit ups bug from a mate I used to do martial arts with who had the Guinness world record for inclined sit ups.....build the core and everything else falls into place.

Fridays: We finished at lunchtime so I would run from Viersen to JHQ which was around 10 miles, used to take me around 1 hr 10 mins.

On top of that: Using a bicycle and not a car for short hops, being the badgemans appointed pace maker for unit BFT's, along with regular organised training for patrolling and military skills competitions.
Wot he said.
 
Appreciate the feedback and yeah im going to progressively increase the running lengths but the running plan ive got on here was recommended by someone on the paras version of this and then i got the bodyweight workout from a former paras' book but i modified it abit, right now though i could probably run 6 or 7 miles max without needing to rest for a few days so that is something i need to work on.

also with the changed army fitness tests would it not be worth it to buy some kettle bells or dumbells to cater more towards that and about the tabbing i was going to do that once ive got alot better at running because i didnt want to rush myself too much, ive give myself until 2022 to get in shape so ive got a while.

I have no clue what the new fitness tests are.

Running sensibly for distance will build endurance and stamina. Interval training/fartlek works wonders for that too - I used to incorporate it mid-point of part of a longer run.

Tabbing is not running so don't think that way before you start. It is sort of shuffling running, when you start that have nothing more than a rolled up blanket, or anorak in your rucksack/bergen and gradually add some weight, small amounts of around half a kilo at a time. If you screw up your back it is screwed up for life.

If it makes you feel good get yourself some weights, seriously though there is not much you cannot do with bodyweight.

2022; plenty of time to build yourself up without killing, or injuring yourself.

Good luck, and take care.
 
my plan
add distance to each run every week e.g 1 km

monday :
6 mile run
leg workout with core

tuesday :
5 miler
upper body and core

wednesday
no run
gym workouts of your choice , work on weakness

thursday :
6 miler
legs

friday :
speed session or 2 x 2 km run
upper body with core

saturday :
rest

sunday
long run :
 
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